Water procurement

All posts tagged Water procurement

emergency-water-source

By Ken Jorgustin – Modern Survival Blog

Water. You all know that water is among the very highest of priorities for survival. The vast majority depend on flowing water from their local municipal water department while others depend on their wells.

Since many of you are also preparing for a worst-case collapse scenario whereby the infrastructure may also collapse or be interrupted, one of your highest concerns should be a plan (and the methods) to move emergency water from an external source back to your home…

Think of a hypothetical scenario – regardless of cause – your existing water source ‘dries up’. Gone. Add to that scenario the circumstance such that everyone else is in the same predicament. Lets say that the grocery stores have all sold out of their water bottles.

Uh-oh, what will you do?

Continue reading at Modern Survival Blog: Methods To Transport Emergency Water From Source To Home

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StockpileWater

By Pat Henry – The Prepper Journal

I wanted to start a new series on the Prepper Journal called “Back to Basics”. I know many of the readers of this blog are already well along their own journey of preparedness so some of the content might be remedial. It has certainly been covered on our site before, but there are new readers every day. Millions of people visited the pages of our site last year and one of the most frequent questions I continue to receive is along the lines of “How do I start prepping”?.

For me this Back to Basics series is a way to revisit the subjects that I believe are core to your personal survival. I plan to cover a lot of familiar territory, but I hope to also bring new ideas, perspective and hopefully motivation to preppers out there whether you are just starting or have your underground bunker fully stocked and you are just waiting for the balloon to go up.

Prepping in its most basic form to me is about proactively taking steps to ensure you and those around you are ready with skills, supplies and a plan to react to emergencies or disasters in a way that promotes your survival. The core of short-term survival I would argue is something that many of us take for granted and that is

Continue reading at The Prepper Journal: Back to Basics: Why and How to Stockpile Water for Emergencies

GunslingerWellPump

By Pat Henry – The Prepper Journal

As part of my preps, water is high on the list of items I strive to ensure I have options and redundancy for so when Tony from Gunslinger Well Pumps contacted me to review his Quick Draw hand well pump I was very interested. We have water stored in our home and rain barrels that can hold hundreds of gallons as well as a fairly large pond directly across the street from our house. But in addition to all of those potential sources there was one more that I hadn’t tapped into for years that I had been meaning to find a solution for.

We have a well on our property that hasn’t been used in at least 20 years. When we moved into our home it was already there, a small nub in the back yard surrounded by a little concrete pad and the remnants of electrical wiring. It had not been hooked up to a pump since before the people we purchased the home from had lived there. It was a potential source of water with no easy way of collection but we have always talked about using it to water the garden or supply additional water needs if our city water was shut off.

For years my wife and I had discussed the prospect of getting that well working for us from time to time but never did anything. Thinking of this resource from a strategic standpoint, I had always viewed this as a backup source if all hell broke loose and just hoped that I would find some creative way of making a bucket system with a pulley and of course finding clean water at the bottom of the hole if I ever needed it.

What are you one of those Preppers?

At one point I called a local well pump service man and asked him how much he would charge me to stick a manual hand pump in there like the kind you see on old movies or in Lehman’s catalog thinking that would be a great option. The first words out of the man’s mouth was, “What are you, one of those preppers?” and after I tried to convince him that I just wanted options for my well he started talking about how expensive they are (around 1K) and how everyone rushed to get those installed before Y2K and how everyone was crazy. He told me he could show me a simple tripod and bucket idea that would save a ton of money but never called back. I guess he didn’t want to fool with me.

So the well sat until recently and Gunslinger contacted me about performing a review of his manual well pump solution. The Gunslinger Quick-Draw Emergency Hand Well Pump seemed to be perfect for my plans of providing a water option using my long-neglected well. The pump is designed to be deployed when you need it and for a prepper, this seems like a good balance between preparedness and a dedicated, more costly well pump.

The Quick-Draw well pump comes almost ready to go right out of the box.

The Quick-Draw well pump comes almost ready to go right out of the box.

The Quick-Draw is just about ready to use right out of the box, all you need to do is insert the pump end section onto the bottom of the hose or that is the idea. The instructions provided are very clear and if you want more detail, Gunslinger provides plenty of set up and modification videos on their site.

Gunslinger2

Simply connect the bottom pump housing onto the hose.

The quick-draw well pump comes in preset lengths of 100′, 75′, 50′ and 25′ and I ordered the 75′ product because I thought my water well went down that far. I assembled the pump which is virtually all plastic pieces except for the brackets that hold the pump firmly to the well shaft housing and dropped it down into my well.

Gunslinger4

Feed the well pump hose into your well.

I wasn’t able to feed all of the pump hose. It went down fairly smoothly to a point and then some adjusting allowed me to feed it down another 20 feet or so, but I must have reached the bottom because the pump would go no further. Figuring I would just test the well pump without mounting it, I started pulling on the handle.

The handle moved smoothly one time but no more and I could feel the internal pex hose straining against the exterior plastic tubing. The instructions from Gunslinger clearly state that the hose has to be straight so I pulled the hose out completely and followed the simple instructions online for shortening well pump hose. I had to do this twice actually to get the length correct and I could have saved a little time by dropping some type of measuring device down my well. Even with having to shorten the hose, this only took a few minutes each time and was easily done with my trusty knife and a wrench.

Once I had shortened the hose sufficiently and connected the well pump to the well pipe for security again, the pump handle slid up and down very easily. It took me about 30-40 pumps to start pulling that water out of the ground. Pumping was simple and my daughter was with me monitoring the whole process so she could install the well pump if needed. Now that my pump hose is the correct length, really all that needs to be done is to connect the bottom piece, feed the hose down into the well, secure the pump with the clamp and start pumping. Simple.

Gunslinger6

Grid-down water pumping goodness!

The quick-draw doesn’t pull gallons of water out with each stroke of the pump, but it does a reasonable job and I can see this filling a gallon easily in close to a minute. For me, this is a perfect balance for prepping needs and I have capacity that I can store in my shed until I need it. Next, I need to have my water tested.

The Gunslinger Quick-Draw Emergency Hand Well Pump in 50′ length costs $280 and shipping is included in that price. Steel well pumps are 3 times that price and require some installation. Similar type of plastic well pumps I have looked at like Flojack and Earthstraw are easily double and sometimes triple the price of the Gunslinger and I would assume they have a similar set up and performance.

I think the Gunslinger well pump is an impressive piece of survival gear for the money and think this makes a compelling product worth considering if you have a well on your property and you are looking for a manual backup option for your water needs. Assuming my water is safe, this pump will give me the ability to provide water for my family regardless of the situation.

This information has been made available by The Prepper Journal: Gunslinger Quick-Draw Hand Well Pump – Grid down Backup

Finding_Water_in_Desert

By Pat Henry – The Prepper Journal

I frequently highlight the need for water when you are preparing for emergencies. This simple, yet vital element of life can’t be ignored for long, so I recommend a multi-faceted approach when it comes to making sure you always have enough to drink. As long as the tap is running and the source is not dangerous to your health, you should be fine. That works great normally, but we all know that stuff happens. Water mains break, sources become contaminated or the disaster can render the pumping stations inoperable due to personnel or equipment problems. Your job is to keep any of those situations from impacting your ability to provide good clean water to your family.

If you are in the safety of your home you can store water in large containers so potential disruptions don’t affect you as much. You can collect and filter rain water from your roof normally or in emergencies, public sources like ponds, streams or rivers will work for a large percentage of us assuming you have fairly consistent access to them. This is usually enough if rainfall and those water sources are prevalent.

But what if you live in a drier climate and you are forced out of your house due to some emergency? Or what if you are lost in the wilderness and your source of water is depleted?

A reader of the Prepper Journal, James sent me an email asking for more guidance on water for the millions of preppers who actually live in Phoenix or other desert environs. I do appreciate the question and although I don’t live in the desert (so this subject is a little out of my imagined wheelhouse) I figured that this topic was very worthy of research for my own information as well. Below are some of the ways I knew about in addition to new ways I learned to find water in the desert. I know that we do have some readers (and authors) who live in Arizona who will be happy to fill in with their own ideas in the comments below also. So, without further ado, let’s get started.

Where can you find water in the desert?

I have been to Phoenix, AZ before on a business trip to a nice resort type of location in the warm days of July. If I did not fully appreciate it before, that trip really reinforced my gratitude for Willis Carrier, the inventor of modern air conditioning. To be honest, the temperatures really weren’t that bad in the evenings and mornings. I was inside during the day so it isn’t like I was too inconvenienced by the heat but with temperatures over 105 degrees, I know that you really wouldn’t want to be more than arms reach away from a good water source for very long. For Preppers, this type of climate does impact the importance of water in your survival plans. The heat and low humidity (but it’s a dry heat!) seemingly evaporates your sweat instantly so I didn’t even see the traditional outward signs of moisture loss, but the ready access to water everywhere reminded you to keep hydrated.

This was reinforced doubly when my wife and I took a drive after that up to the South rim of the Grand Canyon. I had planned a short hike into the canyon and in my research; I was frequently admonished about my hiking plans and water supply. Because of its altitude, the rim where you begin your hike down into the depths of the Canyon can be as much 40 degrees cooler than your destination. You start out at the top of the Canon and it is a relatively pleasant 80 degrees, but by the time you reach the bottom near the Colorado River, the temperature can be as high as 120. To make things worse, the hike back can take you twice as long as the trip down so if you foolishly consume all of your water going down, you won’t have any for the much more strenuous hike back up. Our plans weren’t to even hike all of the way to the bottom, mainly because I didn’t want to have to carry 2 gallons on my back.

Had I been in another, flatter desert environment and found myself without water, there are some tips and tricks you can try.

Dry riverbeds can still contain plenty of water if you dig for it.

North facing shady areas at the base of cliffs – There is water in the dry climates like Arizona. Actually, the main source of water for Phoenix comes from three rivers and they bank surplus water underground, but if you were out in the wilderness it might be harder to find. One thing to remember is water goes to the lowest point which is almost always underground. Even when there is no water on the surface, you can often find it where it used to be. In lower areas, near the base of cliffs, you can dig down and find water occasionally. This water has run off the face of the rocks and settled below the surface. If you find a low spot that looks like the sand is moist, you can dig down and sometimes find plenty to drink. This water will need to be filtered for sediment if nothing else but could save your life.

Watch where birds and insects travel from/follow animal trails – Birds and insects like humans need water to live. You can watch the path that they fly from in the early mornings and evenings for a clue as to where a source of water may be. Animal tracks can be used to follow a path to a water source as well and you may find a watering hole used by the native wildlife. To get a clean source without any type of water filtration you can dig a hole 9 feet away (roughly) from the water source and allow cleaner water under the surface to re-hydrate you. This water, filtered through many feet of sand and silt should be free of any contaminants that the water on the surface of the watering hole would have. Again, I would always try to keep some form of water filtration device with me if I was going out into the wilderness. It’s just one less thing I have to worry about.

Water collects in Tinajas and you can use this to keep you alive.

Rock pockets and depressions – Rain is routinely collected in depressions in rock surfaces. Some of these can be large enough for you to swim in. If you are searching for water, it is a good idea to get up a little higher up to see if you can see a source like this. Just one good-sized hole could be enough to keep you in water for a very long time. There are some of these large depressions called Tinajas, that have petroglyph markings on them and it is thought that some of these may have been ancient directions to denote good places to get water. If not, at least they are really interesting to look at.

Where vegetation is living/broad-leafed trees – If you can find trees growing in the desert, it’s a good bet they have tapped into a source of water. Broad leafed trees like cottonwoods are an indicator that you can dig down to their roots and find water suitable for drinking. These trees could be growing in old riverbeds that still have water flowing way beneath the surface.

In dry river beds – Like the example above, just because there is no water on the top, you may find water by digging below the surface. The drier it has been, the less likely you are to find water but look for a lower place in the riverbed, one where the water would have likely stayed there the most time and dig down. This is another reason to have a handy bandanna with you to soak up water and squeeze it into your mouth.

What not to do if you are looking for water

Solar Still – Now I have heard about solar stills for a very long time. I think even in the Army we discussed these as a good source of water. In a desert however, you won’t get the same amount of return for your effort. Digging a solar still will expend a lot of calories and effort and you won’t get much moisture out of the ground. If you have plenty of green leaves to lie in there, you still have to wait a whole day. If you are thirsty it is better to stay in the shade than dig a still.

Forget the cactus – You have probably seen the cowboy chopping open the cactus and drinking from it. Trying this yourself can get you killed. There is only one type of cactus you can drink from and only one variety of that one cactus. The barrel cactus looks like its name and the Fishhook barrel cactus has water in there that isn’t toxic. It isn’t like a bottle of Evian though and you could still get sick. One alternative is to eat the fruit off the cactus. Prickly pear can be roasted to get rid of the little hairs and spines and can provide some moisture.

Don’t drink your own pee or anyone else’s for that matter – If your body is straining with lack of hydration, the last thing you want to do is force your kidneys to work overtime on a strange substance. Yes, your urine is supposed to be “sanitary” but this shouldn’t be a trick you use to re-hydrate yourself even in an emergency. What you can use it for is evaporative cooling. Soak that bandanna in your urine and wrap it around your neck to cool off somewhat. Then make a mental note to wash that bandanna.

So there are some ideas I have for how to find water in the desert. I think it goes without saying that as much as possible, you should plan for water well before you find yourself in a situation that would require you to use any of these methods above. If you are, hopefully this will help.

This information has been made available by The Prepper Journal: How to Find Water in the Desert

surviving a drought

By  – The Bug Out Bag Guide

Imagine, your mind a complete fog, your body unable to lift itself due to extreme dizziness, and nausea and cramping so bad you can barely move. This is what happens to your body after only three days without water – it’s called dehydration. While symptoms and severity can vary, the chances of survival after three days without water are slim.

In civilized society, droughts are thought of more as an inconvenience than a threat; however, in a disaster scenario, the threat of a drought – especially in times of extreme heat – becomes much more real when clean drinking water is a scarce resource.

No matter how thorough your prepping, there is a limit to the amount of water you are able to store. In a long-term survival situation, sooner or later, you’ll need to find a natural water source suitable for drinking. The good news is, even in the driest of times, there are always ways of harvesting water both above and below the ground.

In this article, we’re going to take you through the various methods you can use to harvest water in the wild, teach you to identify and find signs of water, and show you ways to purify harvested water so it’s suitable for drinking.

Continue reading at The Bug Out Bag Guide: Surviving a Drought: Learn How To Harvest Water From Natural Sources

rainwater-runoff-from-a-tarp

By Ken Jorgustin – Modern Survival Blog

UPDATED

When it rains, there is a stunning amount of water that falls from the sky, and it adds up very quickly for every square foot that you capture and collect from water runoff (as from a tarp).

For survival and preparedness, or for the purposes of simply collecting rainwater for various uses including drinking or irrigation, having a method of capturing the rain will provide you with a large quantity of free water.

Here’s how many gallons of rainwater you can collect based on some examples of various tarp sizes and the amount of rainfall:

Continue reading at Modern Survival Blog: Calculate Gallons Of Rainwater Collection From A Tarp

pine

By Tess Pennington – Ready Nutrition

Three weeks without food is survivable, but three days without water will kill you. With water being one of your main survival priorities, you want to know multiple ways of procuring this vital resource in an emergency situation. There are hidden water sources in your home, as well as in the wild. Knowing how to fine tune your skills in order to make the most of a precarious situation will save you time, energy, and potentially, your life.

Survival Tips for Locating Water

If you find yourself in the wild without water, there are ways to locate it. The following survival tips are common sense, but many forget them when lost in the wild.

  1. Locating contour lines in the earth and following them will more than likely direct you to water source you can use. Keep in mind that all rivers and streams will end up in one central location. For example, if you come across a dry creekbed and follow it far enough, you will find a water source.
  2. Another common sense survival tip to remember is when snow melts, it travels down mountain ridges and creates rivers, streams and lakes. The further you move down a mountain crevice, the more likely you will find water. Therefore, when locating water on foot and near mountains, follow the crevices the crevices of mountain ridges and you will likely find water sources near the bottom.

If you are unable to find water sources, check out these videos on ways to find water in the most unlikely places.

Transpiration

Heavy dew can provide one with an ample source of water. Dew will settle on foliage such as grasses and tree limbs at night. If you have a plastic bag (sandwich bag, trash bag, grocery bag, mylar blanket) in your pack, you can cover the limbs of trees and add a rock to provide weight. Secure the bag to collect moisture from the air. Over the course of the day the plant will transpire and produce moisture that will collect at the low point. Poke a hole in the bottom of the bag and collect the water. The video shows you the classic way of collecting moisture from the air, but it also shows you a quick and easy way of accessing it. Watch the video to see what I mean.

Tap a Tree

The guys over at Sigma 3 Survival School demonstrate a rather primitive way of tapping a tree to procure water. Bear in mind this technique only works in late winter/early spring and when the sap is running high in the tree. As well, this only works with certain trees such as birch and maple. Although I have never tried this method, the video states you can get enough water to fill a canteen and the water is already filtered.

Dew Collection

Here’s another great video from Sigma 3 Survival School and is a relatively easy way to collect a considerable amount of water. Absorbent bandanas, towels or shirts can collect water in a short amount of time. You can also tie absorbent material to your shins and walk through tall grasses to collect morning dew. Remember, you want smart survival tricks in order to conserve energy levels.

Dowsing/Divining

I’ve always been apprehensive on making the suggestion of using copper dowsing rods as a way to find water, but it has been used for centuries to locate underground water supplies. The two main items needed for dowsing is a metal “L” rod and a humble stick shaped like a fork. Click on the video below to see how easy it is to use these simple tools to locate water. Once water is found, all you need is a shovel to dig it up.

Knowing the hidden sources of water in your area and how to procure it will keep you alive. Remember, just because water looks clear and clean, does not mean it is safe to drink. You can chemically treat your water using purification tablets, iodine and chlorine, have a portable water filter such as the Katadyn Pro Hiker or LifeStraw, or distill or boil it. Ensure that you have a means to filter or purify your water in order to avoid water-borne illnesses.

 

The Prepper's Blueprint

Tess Pennington is the author of The Prepper’s Blueprint, a comprehensive guide that uses real-life scenarios to help you prepare for any disaster. Because a crisis rarely stops with a triggering event the aftermath can spiral, having the capacity to cripple our normal ways of life. The well-rounded, multi-layered approach outlined in the Blueprint helps you make sense of a wide array of preparedness concepts through easily digestible action items and supply lists.

Tess is also the author of the highly rated Prepper’s Cookbook, which helps you to create a plan for stocking, organizing and maintaining a proper emergency food supply and includes over 300 recipes for nutritious, delicious, life-saving meals. 

Visit her web site at ReadyNutrition.com for an extensive compilation of free information on preparedness, homesteading, and healthy living.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition

 

This article first appeared at Ready Nutrition: Smart Survival: This is How You Find Water When There Is None To Be Found