survival plan

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9 Overlooked Things That Can Go Wrong With Your Survival Plan

By Rich M – Off The Grid News

There’s a saying in the military that no plan survives contact with the enemy. This is a pretty good thing for us to keep in mind, as preppers. While we may not have a human enemy that has a vote in whether or not our plan will succeed, we can say that the disasters that we face and the need to survive are our enemy. As such, we should recognize that whatever survival plans we have won’t necessarily survive more than about five seconds after the disaster hits.

This was brought home to me by the hurricanes we had this year. While I was not caught in any of them, Hurricane Harvey looked like it was headed right for my home, before it veered north to attack Corpus Christi and Houston. But it was my after-action review of these hurricanes that made me realize that no matter how good any of our plans might be, we may not be able to use them, because nature and circumstances get a vote in their effectiveness.

Continue reading at Off The Grid news: 9 Overlooked Things That Can Go Wrong With Your Survival Plan

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Salt

By Pat Henry – The Prepper Journal

One of the most diverse prepper considerations from the standpoint of a long-term disaster is heath. By health I am not specifically referring to the risks to your health from the disaster itself. If you are living through a hurricane or earthquake, there are natural risks to your health that you need to mitigate in the moment. Prior planning helps you with identifying the risks in this type of scenario and developing a course of action to take. If there are violent mobs approaching your city, that is another risk and those subjects are just one piece of the health equation that preppers need to plan for. Prepping is all about staying alive and alive usually assumes healthy. If your health deteriorates too far, you won’t be alive for very long.

Physical safety from harm has one dimension. Then you have nutritional health and that brings in the considerations of adequate food, sanitation and hygiene and treatment of illness, and the subject of clean water. These things could have a far greater impact on your life after some disaster than the actual disaster itself, assuming you did have a plan and were able to take steps to get yourself out of harm’s way. Yes you could be affected by that natural disaster, but with minor preparations and some action, that is largely avoidable.

During the clean up in the days, months and possibly years after the event, your daily nutritional health will likely play a bigger factor into your survival. Assuming you have the food storage covered and you are stocked with water filtration methods and all the toilet paper you can handle, there are many other considerations our body needs to run as efficiently as possible. And like a lot of other prepping supplies, some are harder to find if the grocery stores aren’t open. After the beans, bullets and Band-Aids, do you have plenty of salt stored away?

Why is salt important to nutrition?

Your body needs salt in order to function. In fact, Salt is essential to life and you simply can’t live without it. Salt isn’t something the food companies made up either and its importance was very evident far back in history. The world Salary comes from the Latin root word for salt, “sal” because Romans were paid in salt. Salt is so important that we need to include that in our daily diet and even more so if we are depleting salt as in the case of heavy perspiration.

What is salt used for in the body? According to Mercola:

  • Salt is a major component of your blood plasma, lymphatic fluid, extracellular fluid and even amniotic fluid.
  • Salt helps your body properly carry nutrients into and out of your cells.
  • Salt helps you maintain and regulate blood pressure
  • Salt increases the glial cells in your brain, which are responsible for creative thinking and long-term planning. Something you are sure to need if the grid goes down for very long.
  • It helps your brain communicate with your muscles via sodium-potassium ion exchange.

When our bodies don’t have enough salt to provide for optimal health you can develop a condition known as hyponatremia. In hyponatremia, your body’s water levels rise, and your cells begin to swell. This swelling can cause many health problems, from mild to life-threatening.

Hyponatremia signs and symptoms may include:

  • Nausea and vomiting
  • Headache
  • Confusion
  • Loss of energy and fatigue
  • Restlessness and irritability
  • Muscle weakness, spasms or cramps
  • Seizures
  • Coma

Living near the oceans provides a limitless source of salt.

How much salt should you stock up on?

So it’s clear we need to plan for salt as part of our overall health if we want to maintain optimal levels, but how much should we stock up on and is any salt better than another? Most of our diet now provides the salt we need in abundance. Over 80 percent of the salt most of us consume comes from processed foods. The freeze-dried camping meals I love as a bug out bag option give you plenty of salt so you might think you already have everything you need.

When I first started prepping and began my food storage, I went to Sam’s and bought a whole case of Morton Iodized Salt. Each box is 4 pounds and they cost a little over $1 each. I figured I was set for quite a while, but I didn’t learn about the differences in “salt” until much later. Regular table salt has added ingredients (Calcium silicate, dextrose and of course Potassium Iodide) so strictly speaking this isn’t the best all-natural salt you can get. However, I believe that in a disaster or crisis, this will be perfectly fine and it is a cheap way to store a lot of salt. So now, I have at least 48 pounds of salt which I calculate lasting my family three years minimum.

A more pure source of daily salt is Himalayan Salt.

There are healthier sources of salt. Himalayan Salt for instance seems to be the most pure retail source now but it is more expensive as you would expect. Himalayan salt is only 85 percent sodium chloride; the remaining 15 percent contains 84 trace minerals from prehistoric seas. Table salt by example is not pure sodium chloride but is 97.5 percent sodium chloride and anti-caking and flow agents are added to compromise about 2.5 percent. These can be dangerous chemicals like ferrocyanide and aluminosilicate. You should research the health benefits of each and make your own decisions. For my family, we have the Morton salt stored in bulk for what-if and use Himalayan on the dinner table.

How to find sources of salt in the wild

Stocking up on dozens of pounds of salt from your closest big box store is simple enough. Maybe you have a convenient salt mine in your town like the residents of Jericho, but what if you don’t have a home and all of your supplies anymore? What can you do to provide the needed salt for optimal health? Is there a source of salt naturally near you?

Well, you can find active salt mines near you by going to the internet. This site has a simple listing of salt mines by location that you might use to scope out opportunities ahead of time.

Sea Water – Yes, this is a no-brainer I understand, but some people might not have considered that all the salt we could ever need is in the oceans. Just collect seawater and let it evaporate in a container. You might have to wait a while for that to occur, heating over a fire is another option but the evaporated water will leave behind sea salt.

Meats and Seafood – The blood from animals can be harvested for recipes and the meat naturally contains sodium. Salt water Fish are naturally going to have sodium but again, if you are living close to the oceans, you already have a source. Kelp and seaweed are also excellent sources.

Eggs and Dairy – Eggs, large eggs contain 62 milligrams of sodium and while this isn’t all you need, it is a source and provides another reason for raising your own chickens.

Vegetables and roots – Right out in your garden, One cup of cooked spinach contains 184 milligrams of sodium per serving. One cup of raw Swiss chard contains even more, with 313 milligrams of sodium. Other vegetables like artichokes, sweet potatoes, radishes, celery, carrots, broccoli and bell peppers have lower amounts but they are still a source. One cup of raw celery contains 96 milligrams of sodium.

Hickory Tree Roots – Apparently, the roots of a hickory tree can be chopped into small pieces, boiled in water for a long time, but not so long there is not any water left. Remove the hickory root pieces and then boil the rest of the water down and you will be left with a black substance that is supposed to be salt. This one is not one of the better known sources and I can’t find a lot of literature on the subject. That coupled with the higher chance of error seems to rule this out.

What about salt blocks? –This seems like a great idea. Just buy a few blocks of salt, intended for livestock or luring animals like deer into the stand and you are all set. Unfortunately, there are a lot of other chemicals added to those salt blocks to keep them in that nice pretty block so this approach isn’t recommended for salt you can consume later. The salt blocks would be good for their intended purpose though and that is providing a lure for animals. Bring them in close and you can harvest a big deer hopefully. Sure beats licking that block…

What other overlooked prepping supplies have you thought of?

This information has been made available by The Prepper Journal: The Salty Part of Your Survival Plan

 

Image source: Pixabay.com

Image source: Pixabay.com

By Rich M – Off The Grid News

Have you ever gone on a trip, only to find that you forgot something important? It seems like that happens on every trip I take. It doesn’t matter if I’m going away overnight or for an extended trip, something, or several somethings, get left behind. It’s not that I’m disorganized; it’s just that there are usually too many things to take care of at the last minute and I can’t get them all done.

If it’s that easy to forget things on a simple business trip or vacation, what’s going to happen if you or I are forced to get out of town – to “bug out” in the event of a natural or man-made disaster? Tensions will be high, we’ll be rushing around to get out and you can be sure that there will be many things that will be forgotten. The big difference, though, is that we won’t be able to just stop in a store and pick them up. Nor will we be able to call a family member and ask them to ship it to us overnight.

Continue reading at Off The Grid News: Here’s What You Forgot In Your Survival Plan

Image source: WNPR.org

Image source: WNPR.org

By Rich M – Off The Grid News

I’ve found a common problem with many people’s survival plans. This has snuck in simply because we all work from our imaginations in creating our survival plans, which means we imagine ourselves at the starting line when it hits, just like horses lined up for the race. But that’s not realistic. Chances are, when the crisis happens, we will be anything but lined up and ready to go. In fact, we are much more likely to find that our family is scattered all across town, involved in our everyday activities.

With that being the case, we actually need a “pre-plan.” That is, a plan for what we will do from the time that the crisis (natural disaster or man-made) hits until we get ourselves into that starting position. A plan which is designed to get us where we need to be, so that we can put our survival plan into effect.

For pretty much everyone, that means we need a plan for getting home. You see, in any crisis situation, the number one priority is actually getting home. There are several reasons for this, but chief among them is that our survival plan starts from that point. In addition, we need to get home to get to where our survival gear is, as well as to check on our family.

Continue reading at Off The Grid News: The Critical Missing Element From Most Survival Plans

teotwawki

By Ken Jorgustin – Modern Survival Blog

There are some who prepare for TEOTWAWKI (the end of the world as we know it) with the full expectation that it will happen – that one day they will be able to pull out all their preps and implement their survival plan. And when it doesn’t happen (hasn’t happened yet), some actually feel remorse, regret, invalidated, even ‘disappointed’?

While this is not my view (I actually do NOT wish it upon us), I will speculate that many or most preparedness minded folks also do not wish for TEOTWAWKI and instead they look upon their preps and preparedness plans as insurance. Additionally, I’ll bet that many of you actually incorporate your preps and preparedness into your day-to-day lives as much as practically possible rather than waiting for ‘that day’.

Is this you? Which side of the fence do you visualize yourself? Let’s hear some of your examples how you may be currently using your preps or have found circumstance to use them even though the proverbial collapse has not happened yet…

Continue reading at Modern Survival Blog: Examples Of Finding Use For Your Preps Even Though TEOTWAWKI Has Not Happened