San Andreas

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san andreas 2 -- cbsnews

By  Kevin Danielsen – Off The Grid News

I can’t remember the last time I was able to take in a natural crisis flick, and actually admire the survival knowledge it divulged.

Quite frankly, I was pretty darn impressed by the new film San Andreas, because I really feel like the moviemakers did a stellar job of illustrating what an historic earthquake would do to one of the most densely populated regions in the US.

Let’s just say that if you were in search of destruction, then you will most certainly find it in this movie. At the same time, while it did have a good bit of heartaches, touching moments, and the taxpayer-funded personal usage of a helicopter with a bottomless gas tank, it was LOADED with priceless survival tactics for those of sound mind and willingness to watch for them.

Well, I was one of those individuals. As I took notes in the theater, I came up with 20 epic survival lessons that I learned from the movie:

1. Teamwork is everything. Because chances are, you’re not going to be alone when unseen forces roundhouse kick the earth.

2. Know the risks of where you live. Residing in a city that sits in front of, say, the Hoover Dam could cause some serious issues in the event of an earthquake, a badly placed meteor impact, or a stick of dynamite. (Food for thought.)

3. Understand the science of your region’s most imminent crises. And listen to the experts on this one, because they likely didn’t get that job on sheer luck and a firm handshake.

Continue reading at Off The Grid News: 20 Epic Survival Lessons From ‘San Andreas’

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By Daisy Luther – The Organic Prepper

Nothing warms my prepper’s heart more than a good disaster movie that supports my hypotheses about a specific event, and the recent movie San Andreas was no exception.

Okay, sure, there was some pretty unrealistic stuff like when The Rock was driving a boat through post-tsunami San Francisco and just happened to find his daughter that he was looking for. The last time I went to San Francisco, my daughter and I had trouble finding each other on the first floor of Forever 21, for crying out loud.

But, when you only have two hours for a movie, you have to be willing to suspend your disbelief somewhat and put that kind of stuff aside.  So. putting that aside, I enthusiastically recommend the movie. We live about 4 hours from San Francisco and go there occasionally for educational outings to the excellent museums, so the setting was quite familiar to us, as was the premise of what would occur if an earthquake happened there. So familiar that my daughter was the frequent recipient of my elbow, as I whispered, “See!!!! I told you this was what would happen if the Big One hit that time we went to the Science Museum!”  Trooper that she is, she said, “Yes, Mom, I know, you were right about that too.” Since she’s a teenager, she probably also rolled her eyes each time, but it was dark and I can’t be absolutely certain of that.

As I’ve said before, you can’t overestimate the value of finding entertainment that enhances your preparedness mindset. A movie is like the prepper version of a sporting event, where we can cheer, jeer, and scheme our ways through some imagined event. It engages our love for critical thinking while allowing us to take a break from our everyday activities. (Here’s my list of 40 prepper movies you can find online.) I know that some folks don’t go to the movies or engage in any form of popular culture, which is certainly a matter of personal choice. It’s not an everyday thing for us to go to the movies, but I’m of the firm belief that a prepared lifestyle doesn’t have to be bereft of fun, especially if you want your children to get involved.  I try to enjoy outings like this with my kids every once in a while.  We really liked the movie, and the special effects were incredible in 3D.

Here are 12 things that interested me, as a prepper, about San Andreas. I’ll try really hard to be vague enough that I don’t spoil the movie.

  1. People panic and behave badly.  In every disaster movie, there’s always someone more concerned with his or her own skin than the skin of a loved one, and this is no exception. Life-threatening terror brings out the worst in many people.  As shown in the movie, some first responders will bail to take care of their own families. The bottom line is, you can’t rely on others to save you. Also, it helps to have some knowledge of engineering and basic physics, too.
  2. People panic and behave stupidly.  During the panic of the aftermath of The Big One, people do the dumbest things.  This is true of real life too, and part of the reason for this is cognitive dissonance. People are so complacent about the stability of their everyday lives that it is difficult for them to function when something horrible and out of the ordinary occurs.  Having a mindset that plays through potential disasters ahead of time makes it far easier to accept it when something terrible happens, which in turn, makes it easier to act in a manner that will aid in survival instead of running around like a chicken without a head. (Check out How to Survive Anything in 3 Easy Steps for more on this.)
  3. Drop, cover, and hold on. The seismologist guy repeated the same information over and over, but most of the time, people failed to listen. When huge chunks of cement are flying at you, running down the road is not always the best course of action.  The very best thing you can do is get down under something big and stable and hold on tightly.  According to the US Department of Labor, the quake itself doesn’t cause injuries, the aftermath of structural damage causes injuries: “Most earthquake-related injuries result from collapsing walls, flying glass, and falling objects as a result of the ground shaking, or people trying to move more than a few feet during the shaking.” Structural damage to buildings would be vast in a quake like the one depicted. (Here’s more information on potential structural damage.) PS:  Your car is not a big, stable place to go to for cover. (source) Knowing what to expect in the event of an earthquake is very important.  This is a great article about earthquake survival.
  4. The ability to communicate is vital.  In the aftermath of a major disaster, your cell phone is very unlikely to work. Partly because everyone else will be trying to use their phones at the same time, and partly because local towers may also have been affected by the disaster. If you live in (or are visiting) an earthquake prone area, a secondary communications device is essential.  This article about an earthquake preparedness kit has some excellent suggestions. Remember that landlines often work when the internet and cell phones do not.
  5. Also vital: basic first aid skills.  Remember above, where I quoted how must injuries come about from the destruction of buildings?  After the earthquake in Haiti, the CDC reported that the most common injuries were fractures/dislocations, wound infections, and head, face, and brain injuries. Doctors performed wound debridements, amputations, and treatment for orthopedic trauma from crushing injuries. You need to know how to remove debris that might cause further damage, immobilize an injured limb, stop bleeding, apply a tourniquet, and clean a wound at the very least. It also helps if you have some supplies on hand or know where to find them.
  6. You should always have a plan for the family to meet.  In the movie, the family has a meeting place planned. This is not something that should be left for the day of a horrible event. You should always have a plan for your family in the event that you can’t communicate.  It helps if you can fly (and steal) a helicopter like The Rock, but since most of us don’t have access to that resource, we have to make other plans. My family always sets up meeting places in case we get separated and my kids know to go there and wait. Actually, we did this from the time they were little and my oldest daughter got in the middle of a clothing rack to “surprise mommy” and I couldn’t find her.
  7. You always need a backup plan. In the event that Plan A isn’t going to work, you need to have a Plan B. (And C and D and so on.) It’s really helpful if your family knows what Plan B is so that you are able to meet up and not hope to just randomly find one another. Again, this goes to thinking things through BEFORE a disaster occurs.   You MUST be adaptable to survive.
  8. When one disaster happens, others soon follow.  This is a frequent truth of disasters.  When one thing goes wrong, some other horrible event is often triggered by that. This was true in the movie, with things like looters, instability of structures which collapsed later, rifts in the roads, and oh yeah, a tsunami.
  9. Don’t forget tsunamis. For the love of all things cute and fluffy, if you are anywhere near the coast and an earthquake happens, GO UP. Do not wait until you see the ocean draw outward or you see the gigantic wave approaching. You aren’t going to be able to outrun it, no matter how fit you are. Immediately seek the highest point around if an earthquake occurs when you are near the coast.  We take this a step further when we visit the coast and map out the high points beforehand.  I was gratified that my two San Francisco high points were the ones noted in the movie. There is also some good advice if you just happen to be out boating when a tsunami is approaching.
  10. Don’t take the closest evacuation route, take the safest evacuation route.  Because San Francisco is the point of a peninsula, it’s most directly connected to the rest of the state by long bridges. I’ve always thought it would be a terrible idea to attempt to evacuate over those bridges in the aftermath of a disaster, since a) everyone else will be doing the same thing, resulting in gridlock and b) the structure of the bridges is likely to be weakened or damaged by a huge quake and c) a tsunami coming into the bay would sweep vehicle right off the bridge even if it held up.  Oh – and d – there are sharks in the water below – lots of them, which is why Alcatraz is in the middle of the bay. I’m sure they’d just love an all-you-can-eat bridge collapse buffet. But I digress – my personal evacuation route out of the city is south, to where the peninsula joins the mainland. On foot, in a car, doesn’t matter – that is the safest route, although further. Anytime we go to San Francisco, I set up a rally point south of the city for a friend to come and pick us up should such an event occur.
  11. Bring sensible shoes.  Ladies, no matter how nice we look in heels, fleeing for your life in them doesn’t sound like much fun to me. In the movie, my daughter and I both cringed thinking about how awful it would be to have to climb out of debris in general and how doubly awful it would be to have to do it in non-sensible footwear. If you have to wear heels, at least have something sensible in your bag.
  12. Gather supplies whenever you see them. While everyone else is panicking, if you have your wits about you, you’ll be able to gather up supplies that will help you survive. Look for things like bottled water, communication devices, first aid supplies, tools, knives, lighters, and food.

Have you seen the movie yet? What did you think? Do you have any survival lessons to add?

This article first appeared at The Organic Prepper: San Andreas for Preppers: 12 Earthquake Survival Lessons from the Movie

About the author:

Daisy Luther lives in a small village in the Pacific Northwestern area of the United States.  She is the author of The Organic Canner,  The Pantry Primer: A Prepper’s Guide to Whole Food on a Half-Price Budget, and the soon-to-be-released The Prepper’s Water Survival Guide: Harvest, Treat, and Store Your Most Vital Resource. On her website, The Organic Prepper, Daisy uses her background in alternative journalism to provide a unique perspective on health and preparedness, and offers a path of rational anarchy against a system that will leave us broke, unhealthy, and enslaved if we comply.  Daisy’s articles are widely republished throughout alternative media. You can follow her on Facebook, Pinterest,  and Twitter,.

San Andreas Movie Poster

By Michael Snyder – End of The American Dream

Hollywood has a long history of inserting political messages, social commentaries, subliminal effects and even cryptic warnings about the future into big budget films.  So is someone attempting to use “San Andreas” to tell us something?  For many years, doomsayers have been warning that the “Big One” is going to come along and rip the coastline of California to shreds.  Up until this moment, it hasn’t happened, but without a doubt we have moved into a time of increased geological activity all over the globe.  As you read this article, 42 volcanoes around the planet are currently erupting.  That means that the number of volcanoes erupting right now is greater than the 20th century’s average for an entire year.  In addition, we have been witnessing a great deal of very unusual earthquake activity lately.  Just in the United States, we have seen unusual earthquakes hit Michigan, Texas, Mississippi, California, Idaho And Washington within the last month or so.  Could it be possible that our planet has entered a period of heightened seismic activity?  And could it also be possible that someone behind “San Andreas” is aware of this and is trying to warn us about what is coming in our future?

Of course just about everyone in the scientific community acknowledges that the “Big One” is eventually coming to California.  In fact, the U.S. Geological Survey recently came out and said that the probability of a megaquake along the west coast is greater than they had previously been projecting

A recent report by the U.S. Geological Survey shows the inevitability of just such a quake, which is predicted to hit within the next couple of decades.

“The new likelihoods are due to the inclusion of possible multi-fault ruptures, where earthquakes are no longer confined to separate, individual faults, but can occasionally rupture multiple faults simultaneously,” lead author of the study and USGS scientist, Ned Field says. “This is a significant advancement in terms of representing a broader range of earthquakes throughout California’s complex fault system.”

And it is undeniable that California has been hit by an unusual number of earthquakes recently.  Could this be a sign that our portion of the “Ring of Fire” is heating up?  Just over the past few days, there have been significant earthquakes at dormant volcanoes all over the state of California and in Nevada.  I don’t know about you, but to me all of this shaking is reason for concern.

If the state of California does get hit by a major earthquake in the near future, the damage that would be caused would be immense.  Among those trying to raise awareness about this is Los Angeles mayor Eric Garcetti

“I hope this movie can be a gut check and a visceral reminder to people of the danger from quakes,” Garcetti said before the screening. “But then that people will also do a head check about how they can really be prepared…to react by looking at some good research and using their heads about the dangers we really face.”

Garcetti has recently introduced a series of proposals called “Resilience by Design” to try to make sure the city’s buildings, telecommunications system and water supply are able to withstand a large earthquake. Emphasizing the challenges Los Angeles faces, the mayor noted how mobile phone service largely went down after the 1994 Northridge quake. And he said the water supply could also be challenged in the next big shaker, considering that the San Andreas Fault (depicted as causing the giant temblor in the Warner Bros.’ film) crosses the California Aqueduct in 20 places.

But not everyone appreciates this new film.  One of the features of “San Andreas” that has been heavily criticized as being “unrealistic” is the giant tsunami that engulfs San Francisco.  According to the Daily Mail, it is not possible for the San Andreas fault to even cause a tsunami…

And, unlike the film, the San Andreas can’t spawn tsunamis.

Most tsunamis are triggered by underwater quakes, but they can also be caused by landslides, volcanoes and even meteor impacts.

So why is a giant tsunami in the film?

Continue reading at End of The American Dream: Is ‘San Andreas’ A Cryptic Warning About What Is Going To Happen In America’s Future?

About the author:

Michael T. Snyder is a graduate of the University of Florida law school and he worked as an attorney in the heart of Washington D.C. for a number of years.

Today, Michael is best known for his work as the publisher of The Economic Collapse Blog and The American Dream

Read his new book The Beginning of the End

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By Chris CarringtonThe Daily Sheeple

No injuries have so far been reported after a 5.1 earthquake hit the Northern Californian coast 70 miles west of Ferndale. According to the United States Geological Survey website, the quake struck at 0416 this morning Pacific time.

The largest earthquake to hit California was a 7.9 in 1887. According to the USGS:

This earthquake occurred on the San Andreas fault, which ruptured from near Parkfield (in the Cholame Valley) almost to Wrightwood (a distance of about 300 kilometers); horizontal displacement of as much as 9 meters was observed on the Carrizo Plain. It caused one fatality. A comparison of this shock to the San Francisco earthquake, which occurred on the San Andreas fault on April 18, 1906, shows that the fault break in 1906 was longer but that the maximum and average displacements in 1857 were larger.

California sits in an area that is geologically very active. Plate margins grind against each other causing the tremors. The San Andreas Fault is a huge gash in the landscape that runs from Cape Mendocino down to the Mexican border. It’s a transform or slide fault. The leading edge of the North American Plate and the Pacific Plate slide past each other.

They move in small fits and starts but on occasion get stuck. The pressure builds and builds, until whatever prominence of rock holding them in position gives way, and the plates move causing an earthquake.

Those living on the West Coast know that at some point the ‘big one’ will hit. This could be a quake caused by the San Andreas or one of the other major fault lines such as the Puente Hills fault rupturing, but many scientists think the worst case scenario would be a subduction earthquake caused by the rupture of the Cascadia fault of the coast of California.

The Cascadia Fault is a subduction zone, an area where one of the tectonic plates is forced underneath the plate it collides into.

In the case of Cascadia, the Juan de Fuca Plate is moving under the North American Plate. These plates have been locked together since 1700, 313 years. A particular feature of the Cascadia Fault is that it doesn’t produce small quakes, it remains still and silent until the pressure gets too much and one of the plates slips, giving rise to a mega-thrust earthquake of massive force. These quakes can be compared to the Indonesian quake of 2004 and the Japanese quake of 2011.

The Cascadia fault is long, very long, just over 800 miles (1300km) in length. Based on the findings of the scientists, the tsunami caused by the 1700 event moved inland for more than 60 miles, wiping out everything in its path. Of course in 1700 Seattle wasn’t there, neither was Vancouver, San Francisco, Portland or any of the other cities and metropolitan areas currently occupied by millions of people.

The Cascadia, courtesy of its length, will give rise to a long quake if the whole fault ‘unzips’ at the same time, as it’s believed to have done in 1700. The first P waves will travel the length of the fracture in a minute or two. The S waves that follow, the ones that cause the real damage, are slower and will cause shaking and movement for about five minutes though their speed can vary depending on the rock they are traveling through. (source)

Although there was no tsunami alert issued with this latest quake that won’t be the case if the Cascadia ruptures. Totally silent for 315 years it’s not a case of if the Cascadia will slip but when.

There has been no detected slippage, no detected small quakes. This is a feature of the Cascadia, it is silent until there is a sudden and massive release of energy. There will be no warning whatever. No foreshocks, nothing.

On a dark winters night in January 1700 a tsunami struck Japan. It flooded fields, swept away villages for miles inland and cost many lives. Even as far back as 1700 the Japanese had made the connection between earthquakes and Tsunami, but this time there was no earthquake, no warning to allow the people time to evacuate to higher ground. The tsunami was called the ‘orphan tsunami’ because it had no ‘parent’ earthquake. For more than 300 years the origin of the orphan tsunami remained a mystery.

In 1987 Brian Atwater studied soil samples far inland across the length of the fault and discovered that the United States had also suffered a tsunami at the same time as the Japanese. He concluded that Kanamori and Heaton were correct, a massive earthquake had sent a tsunami out from the source of the quake inundating the coasts on both sides of the Pacific.

Recent studies by researchers at the University of Pennsylvania has concurred on the findings of previous studies. (source)

In any disaster it’s not only the original event that causes problems. The aftermath of a major calamity can cause as many injuries and deaths as the original event. Most of the population are not prepared, they are not able to look after their family in a crisis. Many will sit and wait for the government to ‘rescue’ them, others will be on the prowl looking to supplement their meagre resources by stealing from those who had the foresight to prepare.

At the start of a new year, there is no better time to assess where you are on your preparedness journey. Find the holes in your preps and your plans and plug them while you still have time to do so.

Resources:

The Prepper’s Blueprint: The Step-By-Step Guide To Help You Through Any Disaster

Mr. Heater F215100 MH4B Little Buddy 3800-BTU Indoor-Safe Propane Heater

Information to help you get started prepping

How to Build a 30 Day Food Supply…Fast

The Pantry Primer: How to Build a One Year Food Supply in Three Months

The Prepper’s Cookbook: 300 Recipes to Turn Your Emergency Food into Nutritious, Delicious, Life-Saving Meals

SAS Survival Handbook, Revised Edition: For Any Climate, in Any Situation

The Survival Medicine Handbook: A Guide for When Help is Not on the Way

Elite Large Fully Stocked GI Issue Medic First Aid Kit Bag

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Contributed by Chris Carrington of The Daily Sheeple.

Chris Carrington is a writer, researcher and lecturer with a background in science, technology and environmental studies. Chris is an editor for The Daily Sheeple. Wake the flock up!

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California is used to minor earthquakes. Sitting atop a myriad of fault lines, both minor and major, earthquakes are away of life. Most of them are un-noticed as they are too small to feel. But over the last ten days, California has had a series of quakes of magnitude 3.0 or above on the Richter scale.

The LA Times records three such incidents. Another has been reported by the USGS today.

California sits in an area that is geologically very active. Plate margins grind against each other causing the tremors. The San Andreas Fault is a huge gash in the landscape that runs from Cape Mendocino down to the Mexican border. It’s a transform, or slide fault. The leading edge of the North American Plate and the Pacific plate slide past each other. They move in small fits and starts but on occasion get stuck. The pressure builds and builds, until whatever prominence of rock holding them in position gives way, and the plates move causing an earthquake.

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A section of the San Andreas Fault

The San Andreas Fault last had a major rupture in 1680. The average lapse between major slips is 150 years, meaning that the pressure has now been building for 334 years.

Other faults branch off the San Andreas Fault and it’s some of these that geologists believe cause the constant minor quakes that Californians live with.

To the west of California, off shore in the Pacific Ocean lies the Cascadia fault. This is a subduction zone, an area where one plate is forced down and under the one it collides with. The Juan de Fuca plate is sliding under the North American plate. Any earthquake produced here would be a megathrust quake, similar to the one that destroyed parts of Indonesia on December 26th 2004.

The Cascadia fault line runs from Northern Vancouver Island to Cape Mendocino California. The last time this one unzipped was in 1700. The resulting earthquake is well documented and the huge tsunami it generated affected not only the United States, but Japan, where it was until recently known as The Orphan Tsunami.

The USGS reported in December that a large quake would devastate cities such as Los Angeles. San Francisco has been hit by several large earthquakes that have been generated by the San Andreas or one of the faults that branch off it. 1906, 1925, 1933, 1957, 1964, 1971, 1987, and 1989 all saw earthquakes that resulted in the loss of life.

The San Andreas Fault may be awakening, foreshocks usually come in groups, are of a higher magnitude than the area usually experiences, and sometimes rumble on for weeks or even months before a major earthquake strikes.

In major urban areas such as Los Angeles or San Francisco, the destruction and loss of life would be substantial, and it’s to be hoped that this series of shocks is not the San Andreas Fault clearing its throat before the main event.

Sources:

http://www.sci.sdsu.edu/salton/San%20AndreasFaultSyst.html

http://geology.com/articles/san-andreas-fault.shtml

http://www.pnsn.org/outreach/earthquakesources/csz

Delivered by The Daily Sheeple


Contributed by Chris Carrington of The Daily Sheeple.

Chris Carrington is a writer, researcher and lecturer with a background in science, technology and environmental studies. Chris is an editor for The Daily Sheeple. Wake the flock up!