recipes

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cranberry

By Pamela Bofferding – Ready Nutrition

Cranberries are a beautiful addition to any dinner plate. Their rich color dresses everything up and adds a touch of complex sweetness. Cranberries are also extremely healthy—they are chockfull of antioxidants and proanthocyanidins (or PACs) that help to prevent the adhesion of certain of bacteria (these anti-adhesion properties inhibit the bacteria associated with E. coli, and potentially those associated with gum disease and stomach ulcers as well). Cranberries are also rich in phytonutrients, giving you an upper hand at combatting various illnesses. Women have long-been using cranberry juices and extract to treat and avoid urinary tract infections.

With Thanksgiving around the corner, you might find yourself with an abundance of cranberries on hand. Resist the urge to make typical cranberry sauce and call it a day–the following recipes show a few exciting ways to change things up. And don’t limit yourself to the holidays! These dishes taste great year round.

Cranberry Red Wine Relish

This recipe is a kind of adult version of the classic cranberry sauce. Tasty and colorful, if you make big batches you can put them in mason jars for beautiful holiday gifts for your friends and neighbors.

Ingredients:

  • 1 1/2 cups white sugar
  • 1 1/4 cups dry red wine (this is a fancy one I use during the holidays)
  • 12 ounces fresh cranberries, rinsed and sorted
  • 1 cinnamon stick
  • 2 tablespoons orange zest, cut into slivers

Directions:

  1. Combine sugar and red wine in a medium saucepan. Bring to a boil over medium heat. Add the cranberries, cinnamon stick and orange peel. Reduce heat and simmer, stirring often until most of the cranberries have burst (about 15 minutes). Remove from heat and chill before serving.

Cranberry Chutney

Again, this is a bit of a more festive take on classic cranberry sauce. Perfect with turkey and other holiday dinners.

Ingredients:

  • 12 ounces (or 1 package) fresh cranberries
  • 1 orange, peeled, tough membrane removed, chopped or 1 small can pineapple tidbits, drained
  • 1/4 cup orange juice
  • 2 tablespoons agave nectar
  • 1 large apple, peeled, cored, chopped
  • 1/4 cup chopped pecans or walnuts
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground ginger
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 1/4 teaspoon cumin

Directions:

  1. Combine all ingredients in a large saucepan; bring to a boil. Reduce heat; simmer, stirring occasionally, for 5 to 8 minutes, or until cranberries are bursting.
  2. Chill until serving time; freeze surplus in small containers.

Sweet Wheat Berry Cranberry Salad

Wheat berries are a versatile whole grain. Learn more about how to use them here.

Ingredients:

Makes 8 servings

  • 2 cups wheat berries
  • 1/2 cup walnuts or pecans, chopped
  • 1/4 cup apples, diced
  • 1/2 cup carrots, shredded
  • 1/2 cup dried cranberries

For Dressing:

  • 1 tablespoons lemon juice
  • 1 tablespoon orange juice
  • 1 teaspoon honey
  • 2 teaspoons cinnamon
  • salt to taste

Directions:

  1. For salad: In a large bowl, mix together all ingredients.
  2. For dressing: In a small bowl, whisk together ingredients for dressing. Pour the dressing over the salad and gently toss. Refrigerate the dressed salad to allow the flavors to meld before serving. Serve it cold or heat it up for a breakfast cereal.

Cranberry Quinoa with Cilantro

The stronger cranberry flavor plus cilantro in this dish is a real compliment to the quinoa, which can be a bit bland. Note that the cranberries used in this recipe are dried.

Ingredients:

  • 1 1/2 cups water
  • 1 cup uncooked quinoa, rinsed
  • 1/2 cup dried cranberries
  • 1/4 cup red bell pepper, chopped
  • 1/4 cup yellow bell pepper, chopped
  • 1 small red onion, finely chopped
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons curry powder
  • 1/4 cup chopped fresh cilantro
  • 1 lime, juiced
  • 1/4 cup toasted sliced almonds
  • 1/2 cup minced carrots
  • Salt and pepper to taste

Directions:

  1. Pour the water into a saucepan and bring to a boil over high heat. Pour in the quinoa, cover with a lid, and continue to simmer over low heat until the water has been absorbed (about 20 minutes). Scrape into a mixing bowl and chill in the refrigerator until cold.
  2. Once cold, stir in the red bell pepper, yellow bell pepper, red onion, curry powder, cilantro, lime juice, sliced almonds, carrots, and cranberries. Season to taste with salt and pepper. Chill before serving.

Crockpot Cranberry Chicken

This is a delicious and easy way to prepare chicken breasts. The cranberries add a welcome change to our regular chicken dinner, and I love using the crockpot to prepare meals during the week.

Ingredients:

  • 4 skinless, boneless chicken breast halves
  • 1 (16 ounce) bottle Catalina salad dressing
  • 12 ounces fresh cranberries
  • 1 envelope onion soup mix

Directions:

  1. Place the chicken breasts in the bottom of a slow cooker. Pour the salad dressing, cranberries, and onion soup mix over the chicken. Cook on Low 4 to 6 hours.

Pamela Bofferding is a native Texan who now lives with her husband and sons in New York City. She enjoys hiking, traveling, and playing with her dogs.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition5 Exciting Ways to Use Cranberries

About the author:

Pamela Bofferding is a native Texan who now lives with her husband and sons in New York City. She enjoys hiking, traveling, and playing with her dogs.

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By Daisy Luther – The Organic Prepper

This summer has already been setting records for heat across the country and it’s only June. As the electrical power grid struggles to meet the high demands of central air conditioners battling the heat wave, these hot weather cooking tips can help you to keep your cool without cranking the air even higher.

Cooking is the activity that adds the most ambient heat to your home, followed by running a dryer.  Your choice of cooking methods can greatly increase the temperature in your house, and then your air conditioner must work harder to overcome it. This can add a lot to your electric bill, and worse, if you have no air conditioner, choosing the wrong cooking method can make your home humid, muggy and miserable.

Hot Weather Cooking Tips

Now is the time to seek some different kitchen strategies.  We can look back in history for a guideline, based on what our pioneer ancestors ate.  Foods were lighter and required less cooking since nearly all cooking was done on a wood-burning stove that would have made the house unbearable. As well, many people set up summer kitchens, consisting of either a separate building to keep the main house cooler or an outdoor fireplace.  We can take our cues from them and adapt their diets to our modern lifestyles.

  1. Change your eating habits with the thermometer. As the weather warms up, the harvest from your garden will increase.  Most summer vegetables require little, if any, cooking, and can generally be quickly steamed to perfection on the stove top.  Look for easy, no-cook recipes and fast non-processed foods.
  2. Break out the kitchen gadgets.  Instead of firing up the oven,  or cooking something for hours on the stove top, pull out those dusty, seldom-used kitchen gadgets.  Toaster ovens, countertop grills, and slow cookers can all make meals without heating up the house. If I am going to be gone for the day, I often put something in the crock pot for a nice meal to welcome us home.  (I’ve included a couple of our favorite recipes below.)  The low heat of the crock pot will not affect the temperature in your home, and it’s a great way to tenderize a less expensive cut of meat, to which you can add some fresh veggie sides at dinner time.  Skip the roasting and baking during the summer.
  3. Always make enough to have leftovers.  Leftovers are a goldmine for speedy future meals.  They generally require just a quick heat in the toaster oven or on the stovetop, and some foods are delicious when compiled into a cold salad or rolled up in a flatbread.
  4. Take it outside.  Use a barbecue, a solar cooker, or an outdoor fireplace to cook your meals in the summer, keeping all of the cooking heat outdoors.  If you are grilling meat outdoors, make extra to add some quick protein to your salads.
  5. Focus on local abundance.  Even if you don’t have a garden, you can still have delicious local produce.  Hit your farmer’s market and plan your menus around the seasonal goodness found there. (Find farmers and markets in your area HERE!) Enjoy summer fruits and vegetables like berries, cucumbers, peaches, tomatoes, and much more!  None of these requires much, if any, cooking time.  Just wash and eat!
  6. Try different protein options.  Look for delicious plant-based sources of protein.  Beans picked fresh from the garden won’t require nearly as much cooking time as the dry ones sitting in your pantry.  If you prefer animal products, look for quick-cooking proteins like fish, chicken cut into small pieces, and eggs.  Save large oven-baked roasts for winter fare, or at the least, use an alternative cooking method.
  7. Enjoy the health benefits of eating seasonally.   Seasonal foods provide you with exactly what you need at different times of the year.  For example, in the spring, those tender leafy sprigs like lettuce, kale, peas and pea shoots, and asparagus provide vitamins K and folate, which support blood health, bone health, and cell repair.  The cool delicate foods are light, low in calories, and rejuvenating to the body as you gear up for the upcoming warm weather.  Feasting on these waistline-friendly foods is a great way to get rid of that  insulating layer of fat that you may have acquired during the winter.
  8. You’ll save money in more ways than one.  Not only will your electric bill be reduced by adjusting your summer eating habits, but so will your grocery bill.  Seasonal foods are less expensive by nature of their abundance at a given time.  Farmers MUST sell them quickly or they’ll spoil.  So you can often purchase them in large quantities at rock bottom prices. And if they come directly from your garden, it’s even better for your wallet!

*****

Crock Pot “Rotisserie” Chicken

Here’s a delicious way to cook a whole chicken without turning on the oven. The skin will not be crisp but the meat will be moist and delicious. If you want to crisp the skin, you can carefully remove the chicken at the end of the cooking time and pop it under the broiler for a few minutes.  This is ridiculously easy and you don’t need to add any liquid.  The juices from the chicken and the fruit and veggies you stuff it with will create enough liquid to make gravy if you so desire.

Ingredients:

  • Whole chicken
  • Lemon or lime
  • Onion, cut in half
  • A few cloves of garlic to taste
  • Seasoning of choice

Directions:

  1. Shove the onion, citrus, and garlic inside the cavity of your chicken.
  2. Put your chicken into the crockpot, breast side up. If you want to raise it up a little, wad up a couple of balls of tinfoil tightly to put under it.
  3. Sprinkle the outside of the chicken with your favorite herbs and spices. (I really like this blend by Braggs.)
  4. Turn your crockpot on low and go away for 8 hours. Test that the chicken is done by gently checking to see if the leg is loose. If you can gently pull it away, then the meat is done.

Note: You can start with a frozen chicken too. Turn the crockpot on high for the first 3-4 hours, then down to low for the last 4 hours.

Crock Pot Con Carne

Serve your con carne on a bed of rice or in soft tortillas.  Top it with sour cream or plain yogurt, and garden fresh chopped lettuce, peppers, and tomatoes.

Ingredients

  • 2 pounds beef or pork roast, or 2 pounds of skinless, boneless chicken
  • 4 cups of diced tomatoes
  • 1 diced bell pepper
  • 1 finely minced onion
  • ¼ cup of fresh cilantro or 2 tbsp dried cilantro or 2 tbsp parsley
  • 2 cloves of garlic, crushed
  • 4 tbsp of chili powder
  • Salt and pepper to taste
  • 1 tbsp of brown sugar

Directions

  1. In the crock pot, combine all ingredients except the roast.
  2. Add the roast to the crock pot, being sure to submerge the meat completely.
  3. Cook on low for 8-10 hours.
  4. Remove the meat from the crock pot and use two forks to shred it.
  5. Place the meat back into the liquid in the pot and stir it together.  Allow it to sit, uncovered, for 10 minutes before serving.

This article first appeared at The Organic Prepper: 8 Hot Weather Cooking Tips to Help You Keep Your Cool

About the author:

Daisy Luther is a single mom who lives in a small village in the mountains of Northern California, where she homeschools her youngest daughter and raises veggies, chickens, and a motley assortment of dogs and cats.   She is a best-selling author who has written several books, including The Organic Canner,  The Pantry Primer: A Prepper’s Guide to Whole Food on a Half-Price Budget, and The Prepper’s Water Survival Guide: Harvest, Treat, and Store Your Most Vital Resource.  Daisy is a prolific blogger who has been widely republished throughout alternative media. On her website, The Organic Prepper, Daisy uses her background in alternative journalism to provide a unique perspective on health, self-reliance, personal liberty, and preparedness. You can follow her on Facebook, Pinterest,  and Twitter,.

How To Make Bone Broth, Just Like Your Grandmother Did

Image source: salixisme.wordpress.com

By Rebecca McCarty Off The Grid News

Making bone broths should be an activity in every home. Our great-grandparents made these nourishing concoctions regularly, and by doing so used every part of an animal and stretched their food resources.

Bone broth contains many important nutrients that support good health. Some benefits include:

Continue reading at Off The Grid News: How To Make Bone Broth, Just Like Your Grandmother Did

 By Tess Pennington – Ready Nutrition

Gear up, I’m about to take the whole PSL (pumpkin spice latte) fad to a whole new level! Many of you are getting ready to Halloween festivities and may be looking for a yummy adult beverage to serve at the parties. With all the flavors of fall, pumpkin spice moonshine is a fun drink that has a great kick! Here’s my favorite pumpkin spice blend:

2 teaspoons cinnamon
2 teaspoons ground ginger
1/2 teaspoon nutmeg
1/2 teaspoon ground cloves

 Whether you have made your own moonshine from scratch and want to kick it up a little or go the easy route and purchase some high proof alcohol, this is a great drink to serve at all the adult-centered Halloween parties.

Pumpkin Spiced Moonshine

Ingredients

  • 1 large can 100% pumpkin puree
  • 1/2 cup brown sugar
  • 2 Tbsp. pumpkin pie spice mix
  • 1 can (12 fl. oz.) of thawed frozen apple juice concentrate.
  • 2 pints of high proof alcohol (vodka, everclear, “moonshine.”)*
  • Whip cream *optional

Directions

  1. In a blender combine pumpkin puree, brown sugar, 1 can of thawed frozen apple juice concentrate.
  2. Add mixture to a large pot and add two 2 pints of alcohol. (You won’t be cooking with the pot, I just found it to help mix the contents up better).
  3. Stir mixture until smooth and then ladle into into Mason jars, seal and refrigerate. When you are ready for beverage drink to mix the spices up and, if preferred, add a dollop of whipped cream for the full effect. (We made a sugar rim on the glass and served it as is, and it was amazing!)

Recipe source

Remember to drink responsibly and make good choices!

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition: Make Your Own Pumpkin Pie Infused Moonshine

The Prepper's BlueprintTess Pennington is the author of The Prepper’s Blueprint, a comprehensive guide that uses real-life scenarios to help you prepare for any disaster. Because a crisis rarely stops with a triggering event the aftermath can spiral, having the capacity to cripple our normal ways of life. The well-rounded, multi-layered approach outlined in the Blueprint helps you make sense of a wide array of preparedness concepts through easily digestible action items and supply lists.

Tess is also the author of the highly rated Prepper’s Cookbook, which helps you to create a plan for stocking, organizing and maintaining a proper emergency food supply and includes over 300 recipes for nutritious, delicious, life-saving meals.

Visit her web site at ReadyNutrition.com for an extensive compilation of free information on preparedness, homesteading, and healthy living.

Off grid recipe

By  – SurvivoPedia

If you’re in the comfort of your kitchen surrounded by wonderful utensils, a ton of spices and foods, and a nice electric or gas stove, cooking isn’t an issue. However, if you’re huddled under a tarp or a rock ledge on the run or even just trying to live off-grid without a power source, you’re going to have to take some extra steps to prepare meals.

Especially if you’re hiding, you want to keep your fires low or non-existent. You can also only carry so much food with you, so it’s possible that you’ll have to forage. For this reason, it’s critical that you know about food sources available in your area. You should also have a small camp stove in your bug-out supplies.

Just a note: when I portion out my dehydrated veggies for camping, I always toss in a wrapped bouillon cube in case I want to add some flavor.

Now, we’re going to give you six off-grid recipes that you can prepare with little to no heat.

Continue reading at SurvivoPedia: 6 Basic Recipes To Prepare Off-Grid

By Daisy Luther – The Organic Prepper

Peaches.

Over the past two weeks, I’ve had my hands on 100 pounds of them.

There’s a large orchard just down the road from me, where I buy “seconds” for canning. However, their seconds are about a kabillion times better than the hard, tasteless orbs you pick up at the grocery store, and they aren’t doused in pesticides and then sprayed with preservatives.

We are in sweet-smelling, luscious peach heaven right now.

And we’re using the whole darned peach. Not one drop of juicy peachy goodness is going to waste.

My clever daughter refers to this as “using the whole buffalo.

We have managed to use the lush fruit, the peel, and the pits and we’ve preserved these goodies so that we can have a taste of sunshine during the cold months.

Some of you are probably saying: “Peach pits!  Is she nuts?  Doesn’t she know there’s cyanide in peach pits?”

Yes, I did know that. And I was likewise horrified when I saw the idea to use them to make food.  But after reading several different articles, I feel very confident that the cyanide is reduced to a completely non-toxic level. Don’t take my word for it! Do some research on your own, and only proceed with the peach pit recipes if it feels right for your family.

In the interest of presenting both sides of the argument, this segment from the NY Times strongly warns against consuming the kernels.

Compounds containing cyanide can be found in some fruit pit kernels and some other foods as well, said Dr. Rodney Dietert, professor of immunogenetics and director of the Institute for Comparative and Environmental Toxicology at Cornell University, Ithaca, N.Y., and his wife, Dr. Margaret Dietert, associate professor of biology at Wells College, Aurora, N.Y.

Even cabbage, broccoli and cauliflower contain cyanide compounds, but not enough to make them unsafe, Dr. Margaret Dietert said. In fact, Dr. Rodney Dietert said, “toxic compounds can now be detected at a lower level than was possible when laws were passed making anything above zero risk unacceptable for externally applied toxins and carcinogens.”

Fruit pits can add up to a real risk, however, said Dr. Margaret Dietert, who teaches a course in medicinal botany. Apricot pits, for example, contain a compound called amygdalin, the supposedly active ingredient in laetrile, the discredited cancer drug, said Dr. Rodney Dietert. Amygdalin is a member of the class of chemicals called cyanogenic glycosides, meaning that it can be broken down into cyanide, glucose and benzaldehyde by an enzyme, he said.

A study of the toxicity levels of peaches and apricots clearly shows that 13 to 15 raw peach pit kernels would get you into the lethal range for adults, Dr. Margaret Dietert said.

For apricots, the toxicity varies widely in a tenfold range, depending on variety, she said. . The wild apricot is highest, and some are quite low, but for a variety in the middle level of toxicity, about 17 to 20 kernels would get you into the lethal range. No one has survived eating more than 38.

For children, around 15 percent of the adult level could be lethal, because they are extremely susceptible.

Based on centuries of people who survived after regularly consuming extracts and liqueurs from stone pit fruits, many cooking blogs strongly disagree with the Dietert’s assessment.  There’s even a cookbook called The Little Cyanide Cookbook that is filled with recipes using the kernels of stone fruits. It’s from a credible source, too. The author is a former toxicologist and pharmacologist for the Food and Drug Administration.

BraveTart, another “waste not, want not” kind of person, explains in a blog post:

When I tweeted a menu update about peach pit panna cotta, I received a flood of replies along the lines of omg, cyanide. Since I couldn’t explain the situation in 140 characters, I promised to blog about it and here I go.

Peach, apricot, cherry and plum pits all contain a delicious little almond-flavored kernel inside their hard shells. The French pitch the pits and keep the kernel, calling it noyau. They use it to make all kinds of super tasty things like marzipan, amaretto and (surprise) almond extract. Sometimes restaurants use “apricot pit” or “peach pit” as a euphemism for noyau, an unfamiliar word to most customers, which only adds to the confusion. The pit holds the kernel, but they’re as different as walnut shells and walnuts.

The knee-jerk omg cyanide reaction seemingly everyone responds with isn’t entirely unfounded. Noyaux contain a substance called amygdalin, which breaks down during digestion to become sinister hydro-cyanic acid. Given the chance, a hundred grams of raw stone fruit kernels would produce about 160 milligrams of cyanide. Probably the most over-hyped, shrug-worthy food risk on the planet when you consider a hundred grams of black beans would produce 400 milligrams of cyanide (thanks, dusty copy of Food and Nutritional Toxicology). As with those deadly black beans, cooking the pits causes a breakdown of the harmful substances and renders them safe for consumption, which is why your game of Clue doesn’t come with tiny pewter noyaux along with the wrench and candlestick.

The kernels, not the pit itself, are the part that contains the cyanide. But they’re edible too – French and Cajun folks have consumed them for centuries. The fancy French-chef-name for the kernels is Noyaux, and they are used to make an almond-flavored extract. Raw, if you ate a kabillion of them, it could make you ill.  Incidentally, amygdalin, the substance that has people alarmed, is the basis for an anti-cancer drug called Laetrile. Cooked, the amygdalin enzyme is deactivated, and there is, according to numerous food writers, including Bon Appetit, no further risk. Here’s a recipe for Creme de Noyaux and one for a sweet Peach Kernel Ratafia.

For the most part noyaux are used for flavoring ice creams, custard, apricot jams, or eau de vie. However, there is some argument that they’re harmful. True, the pits have the tiniest amount of prussic acid – you probably know it as hydrogen cyanide – which is poisonous. Given, eating one of these isn’t going to kill you. Eating a small mountain of them raw might. A handful might result in a stomachache. Furthermore when you mix prussic acid with water the acid will leach out of the pit and become stronger. Doing a double roasting eliminates the enzymes and makes it safe for use. (source)

Roasting the kernels at 325 for 15 minutes is said to rid them of their potential toxicity. If you’re uncomfortable with using them as they come from the pit, simply roast them first and carry on.

So….Here’s what we’ve done with all the peachy goodness.

#1 Sweet Lemon Peaches

sweet lemon peaches

Ingredients:

  • 8 pounds of peaches
  • 6 cups of water
  • 2 cups of turbinado sugar
  • up to 1/2 cup of lemon juice

 Directions:

Make a light syrup by adding 2 cups of sugar (I recommend organic turbinado) to 6 cups of water and bring it to a boil.   Stir in a quarter to a half a cup of lemon juice, depending how tart you want the end result to be.

Fill sanitized jars with peach slices.

Ladle the syrup over the peach slices, then process quart jars in a water bath canner for 35 minutes, adjusting for altitude.  Alternatively, process them in a pressure canner at 5 pounds for 10 minutes, also adjusting for altitude.  Approximately 4 large peaches fit snugly into a quart jar.

#2 Vanilla-Spiced Peaches

vanilla spiced peaches

  • 8 pounds of peaches
  • 6 cups of water
  • 2 cups of brown sugar ( I like Muscovado)
  • 3 tbsp of vanilla extract
  • 1 tbsp of allspice
  • 1/2 tsp of clove powder
  • 1 tsp of cinnamon powder
  • 1 tsp of nutmeg

Make a  syrup by adding brown sugar and spices to 6 cups of water and bring it to a boil.   Add the vanilla once the syrup has come to a boil.

Fill sanitized jars with peach slices.

Ladle the syrup over the peach slices, then process quart jars in a water bath canner for 35 minutes, adjusting for altitude.  Alternatively, process them in a pressure canner at 5 pounds for 10 minutes, also adjusting for altitude.  Approximately 4 large peaches fit snugly into a quart jar.

#3 Brown Sugar Peach Preserves

brown sugar peach preserves

The recipe for this decadently rich dark brown spread was originally published  at The Organic Prepper. I’ve since adapted the recipe to be made without added pectin. This is beautifully spreadable and has a pleasing slight hint of caramel.

Ingredients

  • 8 pounds of fresh peaches
  • 2 cups of white or turbinado sugar
  • 2 cups of brown or muscovado sugar
  • 1/8 cup of lemon juice.

Directions

Prep your fruit by washing it carefully. If the peaches are not organic, make a baking soda rinse to help remove the pesticides.

Peel the peaches if you want to use them for making candy, otherwise you can just remove the pits and puree them, skins and all.

Smush your fruit.  You can do this with a potato masher, food processer, blender or food mill.  If you want, you can finely chop some of the fruit for added texture.

Layer the puree, chunks of fruit, and the white sugar in a large crock and put it in the refrigerator overnight.

The next morning, line a colander with cloth and place it in a large bowl. Pour your fruit and sugar mixture into it and allow it to drain for at least 2 hours. I’ve left it draining overnight and the resulting jam was thick and wonderful.

When you’re ready to make jam, place the drained mixture into a stockpot and bring it to a boil.  Reserve the juice for making syrup. Stir the mixture frequently.

Once it is boiling, stir in the brown sugar and the lemon juice and return to a boil. Immediately stir it and reduce the heat.  Allow it to simmer, uncovered, until it reaches the desired consistency.  This may take up to two hours.  Stir frequently and reduce the heat if it begins to stick to the bottom.

Once it reaches the thickness you want it to have, ladle the jam carefully into your awaiting (sanitized) jars, wipe the rims and cap your jars with snap lids and rings. Remember that when you are making jam without pectin, it won’t be quite as thick and “set” as what you are used to. The flavor will be far more intensely fruity.

Process in a water bath canner for 10 minutes and make adjustments for your altitude.

#4 Ginger-Peach Jam

ginger peach jam

This one has a bit of a pepper-y bite. It’s a very nice glaze on grilled meat, and it’s also a nice condiment on sandwiches.

  • 8 pounds of fresh peaches
  • 4 cups of white or turbinado sugar
  • 1-2 tbsp of ginger
  • 1/4 cup of lemon juice.

Directions

Prep your fruit by washing it carefully. If the peaches are not organic, make a baking soda rinse to help remove the pesticides.

Peel the peaches if you want to use them for making candy, otherwise you can just remove the pits and puree them, skins and all.

Smush your fruit.  You can do this with a potato masher, food processer, blender or food mill.  If you want, you can finely chop some of the fruit for added texture.

Layer the puree, chunks of fruit, and 2 cups of the white sugar in a large crock and put it in the refrigerator overnight.

The next morning, line a colander with cloth and place it in a large bowl. Pour your fruit and sugar mixture into it and allow it to drain for at least 2 hours. The longer you let it drain, the thicker your resulting jam will be.

When you’re ready to make jam, place the drained mixture into a stockpot and bring it to a boil.  Reserve the juice for making syrup. Stir the mixture frequently.

Once it is boiling, stir in the rest of the sugar, the ginger, and the lemon juice and return to a boil. Immediately stir it and reduce the heat.  Allow it to simmer, uncovered, until it reaches the desired consistency.  This may take up to two hours.  Stir frequently and reduce the heat if it begins to stick to the bottom.

Once it reaches the thickness you want it to have, ladle the jam carefully into your awaiting (sanitized) jars, wipe the rims and cap your jars with snap lids and rings. Remember that when you are making jam without pectin, it won’t be quite as thick and “set” as what you are used to. The flavor will be far more intensely fruity.

Process in a water bath canner for 10 minutes and make adjustments for your altitude.

#5 Peach Delight Syrup

When you make jam using the no-pectin recipes above, you’ll have a lovely by-product: a delicious, sweetened juice. It’s easy to turn that juice into a syrup that will make your pancakes and waffles sing like a choir or angels.

Because you will end up with different amounts of juice every time, it’s easier to tell you “how” to make syrup as opposed to giving a recipe.

Measure your juice.  Whatever the amount of juice you have, divide by 2.  This is the amount of sugar you will add to make the syrup. For example: If you have 4 cups of juice, you’ll add 2 cups of sugar. If you have a good source of honey, it is even yummier. Use the same rule – measure out half the amount of juice, in honey.

If you want, you can be creative. You can add spices like cinnamon or ginger, or a dash of vanilla extract.

In a large stockpot, bring the mixture to a boil. Stir frequently to keep the mixture from sticking.

Allow it to boil down for at least 30 minutes, but more likely an hour, until it reaches a syrup-y consistency.

Ladle the syrup into your awaiting (sanitized) jars, wipe the rims and cap your jars with snap lids and rings.

Process in a water bath canner for 10 minutes and make adjustments for your altitude. You may can this along with your jam, since it takes the same amount of time.

#6 Spicy Peach Jam

spicy peach jam

This is another family favorite and probably my most requested Christmas gift.  Hot jalapenos added to peaches and brown sugar make a sweet and spicy creation to be served over a soft cheese.  This recipe was originally published at The Organic Prepper. It is nearly identical to the Brown Sugar Peach Preserves above, however, I  haven’t been able to make it the right consistency without added pectin. I recommend Pomona’s Universal Pectin, since it’s non-GMO. Don’t be put off by the higher price – 1 package of Pomona’s is enough for several batches of jam.

I use half pint jars, which is the perfect amount to pour over cream cheese or yogurt cheese.  This sophisticated appetizer is best served with simple,  hearty whole grain crackers.  

Ingredients:

  • 5 pounds of fresh peaches
  • 2 cups of white or turbinado sugar
  • 2 cups of brown or muscavado sugar
  • pectin
  • 1/4 cup of finely chopped jalapeno peppers – include seeds for a spicier flavor

Directions:

Prep your fruit by washing it carefully. If the peaches are not organic, make a baking soda rinse to help remove the pesticides.

Smush your fruit.  You can do this with a potato masher, food processer, blender or food mill.  For this particular jam, I like to puree most of the fruit (including the skins) and then finely chop some of the fruit for added texture.

Follow the directions on your specific brand of pectin – regular pectin will differ from Pomona’s.

In a stockpot, stir the peach puree, peach chunks, lemon and pectin together well. Bring the mixture to a boil over medium heat, stirring frequently.

Once it is boiling, stir in the jalapenos, brown sugar and the rest of the white sugar and return to a boil  until it reaches the desired consistency.

Ladle the jam carefully into your awaiting (sanitized) jars, wipe the rims and cap your jars with snap lids and rings.

Process in a water bath canner for 10 minutes and make adjustments for your altitude.

#7 Peach Fruit Leather

If you have some peaches that are mushy, but not rotten, this is a great way to use them up.

Wash your peaches, then peel them, and remove the pit.

Puree the peaches. If you want, you can add a splash of lemon juice and some sugar.  A friend of mine likes to add vanilla. Don’t add too much liquid, though – you’re going to be dehydrating this.

Use either parchment paper or non-stick liners
for your dehydrator.

Pour the puree onto the trays and smooth it with a spatula until it is very thin. You can leave it slightly thicker at the edges, as they usually dry well before the centers do.

Set your dehydrator at 135 and leave it overnight. (My fruit leather usually takes about 8-10 hours to dry completely.)

#8 Peach Pit Iced Tea

peach pit tea

Don’t throw out your peach pits!  Not only can you have peach tea right now, you can have it throughout the year.  Dry the pits in the oven at 200 degrees for an hour and store them in a tightly closed glass jar.

When you want to make tea, steep a handful of pits (about 1 per cup) in boiling water.  You can steep them overnight for the most flavor. The next day, discard the pits and use this peach-flavored water to make iced tea as you normally would.

You can also steep peach pits in boiling water and serve immediately, sweetened with honey, for a hot beverage.

#9 Peach Infused Liquor

peach infused liquor

Here’s another use for those peach pits!

We use infused liquors for Christmas presents. If you start it now, it will be perfect just in time for the holidays.

In true “moonshine” tradition, we use Mason jars for infusing the alcohol.  Peach flavor is nice with either whiskey or vodka.

Fill the bottom of a 2 quart mason jar with peach pits. You can pile as many in as you want to.  I usually make a layer about 3 pits deep.

Fill the jar with alcohol, leaving at least an inch or more at the top. Put it in a cool dark place and give it a shake whenever you think about it.

When you’re ready for gift-giving season, line a colander with fabric. (I have some natural cotton flour sack towels that I use for this purpose.)  Strain the alcohol into a large pot.

You can decant it as is into pretty containers (the thrift store is a great source!) or you can make it a liqueur.

To make a liqueur, make a simple syrup. (A simple syrup is 1 part sugar to 2 parts water).  Use equal parts infused alcohol and syrup.  Heat slightly to combine, but don’t boil it.

Last step: brace yourself for accolades and adoration from your friends who are lucky enough to get one of these bottles.

#10 Fuzzy Peach Peel Candy

peach peel candy

Not one drop of peach preciousness goes to the compost pile, unless it’s some weird mushy bit that isn’t good for eating.

When peeling peaches to make jam or to can, save up the peels. You can make a delicious candy to satisfy your kids’ urges for those HFCS-laden “fuzzy peach” candies.

Ingredients:

  • Peach peels
  • Lemon juice
  • Turbinado sugar (the crunchy crystals are way nicer for this than a finer sugar)

Directions

peach peels

Place all of your peels in a large bowl. Add lemon juice based on the amount of peels you have. I had peels from 20 pounds worth of peaches and used 1/8 cup of lemon juice.  Toss peels in juice.

In another bowl, put a little bit of turbinado sugar.

sprinkle with sugar

Toss a large spoonful of peach peels in the sugar and then place them in a single layer on the tray of a dehydrator. Continue until all of the peels have been tossed with the sugar.

peaches in dehydrator

Dehydrate at 135 for 6-8 hours.
Store in an airtight container.

How do you preserve peaches?

Share your delicious ideas in the comments below!

Resources

Excalibur 3900B 9 Tray Deluxe Dehydrator, Black

Pack of 9 Premium 14″ x 14″ Non-Stick Dehydrator Sheets- For Excalibur 2500, 3500, 2900 or 3900

Natural Flour Sack Towel- 28in X 29in

Granite Ware 0718-1 Enamel-on-Steel Canning Kit, 9-Piece

The Perfect Peach: Recipes and Stories from the Masumoto Family Farm

The Little Cyanide Cookbook; Delicious Recipes Rich in Vitamin B17

This article first appeared at The Organic Prepper: 10 Awesome Ways to Preserve the WHOLE Peach

About the author:

Daisy Luther lives on a small organic homestead in Northern California.  She is the author of The Organic Canner,  The Pantry Primer: A Prepper’s Guide to Whole Food on a Half-Price Budget, and The Prepper’s Water Survival Guide: Harvest, Treat, and Store Your Most Vital Resource. On her website, The Organic Prepper, Daisy uses her background in alternative journalism to provide a unique perspective on health and preparedness, and offers a path of rational anarchy against a system that will leave us broke, unhealthy, and enslaved if we comply.  Daisy’s articles are widely republished throughout alternative media. You can follow her on Facebook, Pinterest,  and Twitter,.

GreatDepressionRecipes

The Great Depression is almost universally thought of as the darkest time in recent U.S. history from at least a financial standpoint. Like many of you, I know close family members who lived through the depression and their stories of the hardships, but more precisely how they made do regardless of the times, always seem to fascinate me. People were much hardier back then I believe. This period of time is how we imagine life at its hardest; and the realities that so many people faced during that roughly 10 year span seem to loom larger in our collective consciousness to this day. All we need are the right present day events for us all to see how we fare in a similar situation and the worst predictions seem to point to a time where the Great Depression will look like a picnic by comparison.

There are some that say we are already living through another great depression but we don’t know it because of the social safety nets, which over 100 million people rely on daily to get by. Rather than waiting in line for soup and bread, you are given a credit card so you can buy junk food at the store like everyone else. Remove the stigma of public poverty and one could argue the actual harsh effects, and you might struggle less to get out of it. At a minimum, if nobody sees the outward face of poverty, why worry? Not that people on welfare have it good, but the poor in this country live like Kings and Queens compared to the poor in India or China.

Regardless of where you live, it can’t be argued that the prices of food are rising. When the price of groceries increases too far or your ability to pay is decreased, that is when creativity comes into the kitchen and you will need to adjust your menu. During the depression, meat was a luxury that was often only eaten once a week. When I say meat, I am talking about Hot Dogs. Forget having your steaks if we enter another depression. Meals were frequently based on a few simple ingredients like potatoes, flour, onions and vegetables that were grown in the family garden.

Clara's Kitchen

Our society faces a few problems, not the least of which is the ability to grow our own food. In the 1930’s we didn’t have frozen dinners, fast food restaurants and microwaves. Most rural families had their own gardens. If we were to suffer an event now, like the great depression that saw 25% of all workers out of a job, there would be a lot of people unable to eat. That is one of the reasons preppers talk about starting to garden now so that you will not be behind the curve when it’s too late.

If it does come to that and you find it is time to tighten your belt and start making do with less, I thought it would be a good idea to look back in time to see some of the depression recipes that people used to make. I know that we stock up on food that we eat now in the hopes that we will have enough to last us, but I doubt anyone here has stocked up 10 years’ worth of food. If another great depression happens, we will be required to be more frugal and these depression recipes allow you to feed your family with much less.

I have included a few recipes below, but there are also some great books like Clara’s Kitchen: Wisdom, Memories, and Recipes from the Great Depression. Clara also had her own YouTube Channel and you can see her prepare her Poor man’s Meal and talk about living through the great depression below.

In addition to Clara’s Poormans’ Meal, here are a few other options.

Great Depression Pork Stew – Serves 4-6

Ingredients

  • 2 -3 large pork chops
  • 4 large white potatoes
  • 2 large yellow onions
  • 6 stalks celery, include leaves
  • 1/2 gallon water
  • 1/4 cup flour
  • salt and pepper
  • 2 chicken bouillon cubes

Directions

  1. Boil pork until it falls from the bone. Cut into small bite sized pieces (fat as well) and return to pot with some salt and pepper and keep on slow simmer.
  2. Peel and cut potatoes into bite size chunks.
  3. Roughly dice the onion and celery. Add all vegetables and bouillon cubes to the pot and bring to a boil. Simmer low until vegetables are done. Thicken with a mix of flour and cold water. Taste for salt or pepper.
  4. The stew is white with some green so you might want to add a chopped carrot for color.
  5. Serve in deep soup bowls with biscuits on the side. Some may want to add ketchup to their bowl of stew. This is OK – I do it.
  6. You may substitute and inexpensive cut of pork for this recipe.

 

Depression Era Recipes

Old Fashioned Corn and Potato Salad– Serves 4-6

Ingredients:

  • 2 1/2 cups cooked corn (canned is fine)
  • 2 cups diced potatoes
  • 1 tablespoon butter
  • 1/4 cup onion, diced
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1/8 teaspoon pepper
  • 1 1/2 cups boiling water
  • 2 cups hot milk
  • 1 tablespoon flour, mixed with
  • 1 tablespoon water

Directions

  1. Combine, in a large pot, all ingredients except milk and flour/water.
  2. Cook until potatoes are fork tender.
  3. Add milk and flour/water, stirring well.
  4. Bring to a boil and cook for 10 minutes.
  5. Serve with chopped green onion and shredded cheese as a garnish.

 

Creamed Tuna on Toast – Serves 4

Creamed Tuna on Toast

Ingredients

  • 1/4 cup margarine
  • 1/4 cup flour
  • 2 cups milk
  • 1 can drained tuna fish
  • 1 cup frozen peas (or to taste)
  • salt and pepper
  • bread (for toasting)

Directions

  • Thaw frozen peas in a colander.
  • Melt the margarine in a saucepan.
  • Add the flour and blend.
  • Add the milk, stirring constantly to prevent clumping and stir until creamy.
  • Add the tuna, peas, salt and pepper and warm through.
  • As the tuna is warming, toast bread.
  • After toasted, cut in triangles and spoon tuna mixture over the toast.

 

Cornmeal Griddle Cakes – Serves 10-15

Cornmeal Griddle Cakes

Ingredients

  • 1 cup cornmeal
  • 1 cup flour
  • 4 teaspoons baking powder
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons salt
  • 1 egg, well beaten
  • 2 1/2 cups milk
  • 2 tablespoons fat, melted

Directions

  • Mix and sift dry ingredients.
  • Combine beaten egg and milk.
  • Add to dry ingredients.
  • Stir in shortening.
  • Pour on a hot griddle.

 

Wacky Cake – 1 Cake

This gained fame during the depression because unlike traditional cake recipes, the wacky cake didn’t need milk or eggs. It is still delicious!

 

Wacky Cake

Ingredients

  • 1 1/2 cups all-purpose flour
  • 1 cup white sugar
  • 4 tablespoons unsweetened cocoa powder
  • 1 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 1 tablespoon cider vinegar
  • 6 tablespoons vegetable oil
  • 1 cup water

Directions

  1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees F (175 degrees C).
  2. Sift flour, sugar, salt, soda, and cocoa together into an 8×8 inch ungreased cake pan. Make three depressions. Pour oil into one well, vinegar into second, and vanilla into third well. Pour water over all, and stir well with fork.
  3. Bake at 350 degrees F (175 degrees C) for 30 to 40 minutes, or until tooth pick inserted comes out clean. Frost with your favorite icing.

 

Do you have any depression recipes your family loves?

This information has been made available by The Prepper Journal: Depression Recipes – Simple Meal Ideas for Hard Times