Prepping skills

All posts tagged Prepping skills

You are the average of the five people you spend the most time with.

By Daisy Luther – The Organic Prepper

You’ve probably all heard that old success adage that warns, “You are the average of the five people you spend the most time with.” The guy credited with saying this was Jim Rohn, who is widely accepted as the world’s top business philosopher. But don’t overlook it, because it’s true of all facets of life, not just business. In fact, it’s why I suggest you have prepper friends.

How our friends influence us

No matter who you are, you’re still influenced by the people with whom you spend the most time. You tend to prioritize the things that are consistently mentioned and practiced, so if you get together with a few friends to do some canning or to work on a bug-out property, not only are you bonding, but you’re practicing important skills.

When your friends support prepping as a positive and reasonable activity, you’ll be a lot more likely to focus on it regularly. After all, it’s a lot of fun to share a great score of kerosene lamps at a yard sale with people who will actually join you in your excitement.

On the other hand, if your peers constantly denigrate or mock your preparedness efforts, it can be quite demotivating. Who wants to be the object of rolled eyes and deep sighs all the time? You may stick with your efforts in private, but being surrounded by folks like this can make what you’re doing feel far less important – or even ridiculous.

Motivation and encouragement can’t be overlooked as the impetus to help you become better prepared.

What if you don’t know any preppers?

The funny thing about prepper friends is that they’re not always “preppers.”  While it can be awesome to find a group of people who share your interests completely, it isn’t always practical.

That doesn’t mean you can’t be surrounded by supportive peers. Look for folks who practice the skills we prize, like…

  • Homesteading
  • Gardening
  • Herbalism
  • Food preservation
  • Wildcrafting
  • Foraging
  • Hiking
  • Bushcraft
  • Sewing
  • Knitting
  • Living history groups
  • Soapmaking
  • Beekeeping
  • CERT or other community preparedness training
  • Volunteer paramedic or firefighting
  • Volunteer search and rescue

…You get the idea.

While they may not have a bug-out bag, you’ll probably have a lot more in common with these people than folks who live for the next episode of Rich Person “Reality” TV.

Some of my very favorite people to hang out with were folks I met in a homesteading group back when I lived in California. While we didn’t share all the same philosophies, our love of self-reliance and sharing of skills created a strong, lifelong bond.

Find prepper friends online

Barring real life friends, groups online can be a wonderful way to touch base with others who share your views. (Always be cautious about sharing too much personal information with anyone you meet online – heck, in person, too!)

Look for forums, busy comments sections on blogs, or (if you’re into social media) groups on Facebook or Google. (You can join my Facebook group Prep Club by going here and answering the questions.) We have a lot of great discussions, monthly motivation challenges, and conversations about a variety of scenarios. It’s so much fun to share the stuff you canned or something you built with people who will be as excited as you are. What’s more, as a group, we can offer support and suggestions when you run into a stumbling block.

While online friends aren’t quite like in-person friends, if you’re feeling isolated, it can be a great way to find a supportive circle.

The importance of OPSEC

OPSEC is an acronym for OPerational SECurity, and the term was coined by American military forces during the Vietnam war. The basic idea is to protect small pieces of information that could be put together to form a bigger picture. With regard to prepping, it means that you never want others to know things like:

  • How many supplies you have
  • Where you keep your supplies
  • What specific supplies you stash
  • What your home defense strategies are

And in some cases, you won’t want them to know that you’re a prepper at all.

You get the idea.  Don’t make yourself vulnerable, even to people you consider friends. Unless you have known someone a long time, been through crises with them, and fully trust them, there are some things you should keep to yourself.

Do you have prepper friends?

Of course, you’re always welcome to chat here in the comments section. I strongly encourage it!

Are your friends and family also involved with prepping? If not, have you made efforts to meet others who are into the preparedness lifestyle? Do you have some ideas how we can meet likeminded people? Please share you thoughts in the comments section below.

This article first appeared at The Organic PrepperThe Importance of Having Prepper Friends

About the author:

Daisy is a coffee-swigging, gun-toting, homeschooling blogger who writes about current events, preparedness, frugality, and the pursuit of liberty on her website, The Organic Prepper. Daisy is the publisher of The Cheapskate’s Guide to the Galaxy, a monthly frugality newsletter, and she curates all the most important news links on her aggregate site, PreppersDailyNews.com. She is the best-selling author of 4 books and lives in the mountains of Virginia with her two daughters and an ever-growing menagerie. You can find Daisy on FacebookPinterest, and Twitter.

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100 Deadly Skills

By Pat Henry – The Prepper Journal

I am always looking to learn skills that can improve many facets of my life. A chief aspect of prepping I believe is to continually learn and increase your ability to survive. This education can come in many forms from training courses, real-life exposure, videos, lectures and books. For me though I don’t learn from books as well as I do with hands on exposure to the core aspects I am trying to learn. The more complicated the subject, the less likely I am going to learn from a book and at a certain point no matter how compelling the subject matter, if the book is too detailed I usually don’t finish.

I am sure this challenge hampers me from mastering a lot of concepts, but I can’t help how I was born so I try to learn in different ways to prevent my learning-handicap from getting in the way of acquiring skills or knowledge that could be crucial someday. Sometimes I find a source that seems to be a perfect fit for my learning style and 100 Deadly Skills by Clint Emerson fits the bill nicely.

Clint Emerson is a retired Navy SEAL who spent twenty years conducting special ops all over the world while attached to SEAL Teams (including the elite SEAL Team SIX) and the National Security Agency (NSA). Clint was able to use an array of practical skills he developed to protect himself while at home and abroad, he created Violent Nomad—a personal, non-kinetic capture/kill program cataloging the skills necessary to defend against any predator or crisis and his recent book 100 Deadly Skills puts much of that knowledge he obtained and created into the hands of everyday people like you and me.

Going back to my learning style, 100 Deadly Skills isn’t a technical manual. It isn’t a college level white paper on the various subjects Clint is discussing although I firmly believe that any Navy Seal receives so much more education and instruction than could ever be contained in 20 books. I am no Navy Seal though and 100 Deadly Skills is set up to share concepts in a compelling way that while not replacing professional training, still give the average person tons of useful information that could help you if you are confronted with many survival situations.

100 Deadly Skills that you never knew you needed

100 Deadly Skills takes the standpoint of a “Violent Nomad” who is characterized in the book as an operator working overseas under heavy cover. The book proceeds to share tactics that an operator could use in all aspects of what I would assume someone in that line of work would need to plan for.

100 Deadly Skills - Great information for people who want to make sure they can survive any dangerous situation.

100 Deadly Skills – Great information for people who want to make sure they can survive any dangerous situation.

  • Mission Prep
  • Infiltration
  • Infrastructure Development
  • Surveillance
  • Access
  • Collection
  • Operational Actions
  • Sanitization
  • Exfiltration and Escape

Now you may be saying to yourself, “Why would I ever need to know what a Navy Seal operator working overseas in hostile environments would need to know?” and I admit that this book definitely has a target audience of people who find this type of skills or tactics fascinating. This book is not for Navy Seals or secret agents as I said before, it is for regular people and it easily shares information that even a regular Joe could use to protect their life.

Each skill or BLUF (Bottom Line Up Front) as Clint calls them is no more than a page or two and comes with excellent quality illustrations showing the finer points of each of the 100 deadly skills he tries to teach you. I found almost the entire book to be extremely interesting and I came away with a lot of new ideas that I could catalog in the back of my noggin for use potentially. I know I am never going to be working clandestine in the Middle East, but I can easily see the benefit of these skills in a SHTF event. Even if the world as we know it doesn’t end, there is still crime; there are still bad people and bad situations that you might face. A little knowledge sure helps and if these topics interest you, I am sure you will enjoy Clint’s 100 Deadly Skills.

This information has been made available by The Prepper Journal: 100 Deadly Skills – Lifesaving Tips for Preppers