Guam

All posts tagged Guam

By Eric Leister – AccuWeather

The 27th named tropical cyclone of the year has developed in the western Pacific Ocean.

Typhoon In-fa is currently northwest of Chuuk and southeast of Guam. Further strengthening is expected over the next several days.

As In-fa passed near Chuuk on Wednesday night and Thursday, it brought downpours and gusty winds. Earlier this week, In-fa brought more than 325 mm (13 inches) to Nukuoro Atoll in only 24 hours.

A continued northwest track will take In-fa south of Guam on Saturday. By this time, the cyclone could be as strong as a Category 2 or 3 hurricane with winds over 160 km/h (100 mph).

In-fa will pass far enough south of Guam that the island will be spared the worst impacts; however, tropical storm conditions are expected with wind gusts over 65 km/h (40 mph) and downpours capable of producing flash flooding.

Continue reading at AccuWeather: Typhoon In-fa to Threaten Guam Saturday

RELATED:
Guam Weather Center
West Pacific Tropical Weather Center
Interactive Guam Weather Satellite

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By  – AccuWeather

Communities in the path of Dolphin’s eyewall-where a typhoon’s strongest winds occur-will be subject to periods of sustained winds of 130 km/h (80 mph) to as high as 195 km/h (120 mph) at the eastern coast and in the highest terrain, with locally higher gusts.

The extent of the damage will depend on Dolphin’s exact track which is now expected to be closer to Rota than Guam.

“If Dolphin misses one of these islands by even 80 km (50 miles) to the north or south, [the wind] impacts will be less because the core of the strongest wind is small,” stated AccuWeather.com Meteorologist Adam Douty.

Regardless of exact track, Dolphin will bring dangerous conditions to Guam as well as the islands of Rota, Aguijan, Tinian and Saipan. All these islands can expect damaging winds and torrential rainfall.

More continued coverage at AccuWeather: Typhoon Dolphin to Slam Guam, Northern Marianas on Friday

RELATED:
Interactive Satellite for Guam
Detailed Forecast for Guam
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Typhoon Francisco

acquired October 17, 2013
download large image (6 MB, JPEG, 8000×6200)

On October 17, 2013, Typhoon Francisco skirted Guam, but the storm was on a trajectory that could bring it toward Japan next week. The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on NASA’s Aqua satellite acquired this image of the storm at 2:05 p.m. local time (4:05 UTC).

At the time, the storm had maximum sustained winds near 85 knots (157 kilometers/hour or 98 miles/hour) and was expected to strengthen. Francisco’s center was located about 147 nautical miles southwest of Guam, near 12.5° North and 143.1° East.

Weather Underground’s Jeff Masters noted that two of the best models predicted that Francisco will hit Japan on October 23-24, though model results are still quite uncertain that far into the future. This is the 27th named storm in the Pacific in 2013. – Earth Observatory

  1. References

  2. AccuWeather (2013, October 17) Typhoon Francisco to Strengthen, Track Toward Japan Next Week. Accessed September 30, 2013.
  3. Joint Typhoon Warning Center (2013, October 17) Typhoon 26W. Accessed October 17, 2013.
  4. Weather Underground (2013, October 17) Category 2 Francisco Brushing Guam, and is a Long-Range Threat to Japan. Accessed October 17, 2013.

NASA images courtesy Jeff Schmaltz LANCE/EOSDIS MODIS Rapid Response Team, GSFC. Caption by Adam Voiland.

Instrument: 

By Eric Leister,

Typhoon Francisco has gained strength and is a powerful storm as it moves northwestward, away from Guam and the Mariana Islands. The typhoon is likely to threaten western Japan by the middle of next week.

Francisco has developed in a similar area to where former Typhoon Wipha formed last week.

Francisco, which became a typhoon Thursday, brought heavy downpours to the Mariana Islands, including Guam, over the past several days. The weather should improve across the islands as the storm continues to track away from the area.

@NeighborhoodFP  tweeted: “Tokyo & E Japan could be hit again next week as Tropical Storm #Francisco gains strength: http://ow.ly/pTgyY  @breakingweather”Additional Relevant Tweets and Social Media Reaction

Impressive banding features and a well-defined eye are seen on this satellite image of Francisco on Friday.

This weekend and into early next week, Francisco will travel over the open waters of the Western Pacific, south of Japan. Warm water and low wind shear should allow for further intensification as Francisco churns toward western Japan.

It is becoming more clear that Francisco will take aim at southwest Japan, farther west than Wipha. This would be good news for storm-ravaged Tokyo.

AccuWeather.com Expert Senior Meteorologist Jason Nicholls explained, “a track into southwest Japan would minimize the areas slammed by Wipha. Tokyo would see much less rain with this track as well.”

By early next week, Francisco will begin to interact with a storm system over northeastern China. This storm will attempt to steer Francisco to the northeast. Where and when this turn occurs will determine the hardest hit areas.

RELATED: Typhoon Wipha Leaves Dozens Missing in Japan AccuWeather Severe Weather Center AccuWeather Hurricane Center

While the typhoon should eventually bring some wind and rain to Tokyo and other areas impacted by Wipha, it appears the worst conditions should stay south and west of the country’s capitol.

A track toward western Japan or even the Korean Peninsula, as is favored, would be similar to the track of Tropical Storm Kong-Rey, earlier this year.

AccuWeather.com Meteorologist Dan DePodwin contributed to this story.AccuWeather

By Eric Leister

Typhoon Francisco continues to become better organized as it spins to the southwest of Guam.

Francisco has developed in a similar area to where former Typhoon Wipha formed last week.

Francisco, which became a typhoon Thursday, will bring heavy downpours to the Mariana Islands, including Guam, over the next day or two as the storm tracks northward.

Satellite image of Francisco near Guam on Thursday, courtesy of the Naval Research Lab.

As the storm strengthens through the end of the week, damaging winds should remain west of the Mariana Islands.

Later this week into early next week, Francisco will travel over the open waters of the Western Pacific, south of Japan. Warm water and low wind shear should allow for further intensification as Francisco takes a track very similar to that of former Typhoon Wipha.

By early next week, Francisco will begin to interact with a frontal boundary to the north that approaches Japan. This will front will attempt to steer Francisco northward then turn the storm northeast toward southern and eastern Japan.

Depending on the exact timing of the front coming in from the west, Francisco could be guided on a track very similar to the one taken by Wipha.

RELATED: Typhoon Wipha Leaves Dozens Missing in Japan AccuWeather Severe Weather Center AccuWeather Hurricane Center

If this scenario unfolds, another round of flooding rain and damaging winds would slam eastern Japan, including Tokyo.

If Francisco were to miss the connection with this frontal boundary, the storm would likely slow in speed and track off to the west before being lifted northward by a later frontal boundary.

This would likely take the greatest impacts of Francisco into the Korean Peninsula or western Japan, similar to the track of Tropical Storm Kong-Rey, earlier this year

More at AccuWeather – Typhoon Francisco to Strengthen, Track Toward Japan Next Week

By Dan DePodwin

Typhoon Nari crossed the Philippine Island of Luzon Friday. The worst impacts went north of the capital City of Manila. But, heavy rain will likely lead to some flooding in and around the Philippine Capital.

Tropical Threats for Philippines, Vietnam, and Japan

Earlier in the week, AccuWeather.com International Meteorologist Eric Wanenchak mentions, “a track north of Manila favors the heavy rain to fall on the back side of the storm once the center has passed.” This turns out to be the case, heavy rain will last into Saturday across Manila.

Nari will cross the South China Sea and take aim on Vietnam with landfall expected early next week.

Flooding rainfall has inundated parts of the Philippines over the last several months, directly and indirectly related to other tropical systems. A return of torrential downpours is not welcome news.

This season, 26 named tropical storms and 11 typhoons have churned through the basin. This sounds impressive, but during a typical season, there are 26 named storms and 16 typhoons across the West Pacific.

Tropical Threats for Philippines, Vietnam, and Japan

Meanwhile, a new tropical storm has formed south of Japan. This storm (Wipma) will threaten Japan as a typhoon next week.

Tropical Storm Wipma formed just west of Guam Friday. It is expected to intensify significantly while tracking northwestward through the weekend. It will pass near or just offshore of Japan around Tuesday or Wednesday of next week.

As with Typhoon Nari, Wipma is in an area ripe for development. Very warm water temperatures, plentiful moisture and a lack of wind shear will contribute to strengthening.

By early next week, AccuWeather.com meteorologists believe it will be located south and east of Japan. Whether or not the typhoon makes a direct hit on the country depends on a cold front sweeping through northeastern China. If the front is a little slower, the cyclone could make a run at the east coast of Japan.

RELATED: AccuWeather.com Western Pacific Tropical Center Japan Radar Phailin on Course to Devastate India This Weekend

No matter the exact track, gusty northerly winds will buffet Japan early next week. Residents along the east coast of the country should continue to monitor this situation through the week.

More at AccuWeather – Nari Crosses Philippines Heading for Vietnam; New Storm Forms

By Dan DePodwin

The typhoon train in the Western Pacific will persist into the weekend as one typhoon has formed and another could blossom this weekend.

This season, 25 named tropical storms and 11 typhoons have churned through the basin. Over the next week, the Philippines, Vietnam and Japan may be impacted by a tropical cyclone.

Typhoon Expected to Blast the Philippines

Typhoon Nari formed Thursday and it continues to move west toward the northern Philippines. Favorable conditions such as low wind shear and very warm ocean water temperatures will promote strengthening into Friday.

@JohnnyParker012 tweeted: “In the Eastern Pacific, trough of low pressure has medium chance, 40 percent, of becoming tropical cyclone in next 48 hrs. pic.twitter.com/LznPEPCuKg”Additional Relevant Tweets and Social Media ReactionThe storm is expected to lash the northern Philippines Friday into Saturday. AccuWeather.com Senior Metorologist Jim Andrews points out, “Destructive, hurricane-force winds, flooding rains and an inundating storm surge will be possible, especially near a potential landfall in northeastern Luzon Island. ”

AccuWeather.com Meteorologist Rob Richards adds, “Sustained winds can top 110 km/hour (70 mph) with gusts to 160 km/hour (100 mph). Rain amounts can be 100 to 200 mm (4 to 8 inches) with up to 300 mm (12 inches) in mountainous areas. Mudslides could occur.”

Flooding rainfall has inundated parts of the Philippines over the last several months, directly and indirectly related to other tropical systems. A return of torrential downpours is not welcome news.

Manila has been hit especially hard by flooding and is at risk again. AccuWeather.com International Meteorologist Eric Wanenchak mentions, “a track north of Manila favors the heavy rain to fall on the back side of the storm once the center has passed.”

After plowing through the Philippines, the cyclone is expected to emerge into the South China Sea and head toward the Vietnam coast. It is likely that it will make a second landfall in Vietnam early next week, possibly as a typhoon.

RELATED: AccuWeather.com Western Pacific Tropical Center Japan Radar India Faces Tropical Cyclone Threat This Weekend

Slow-Moving, Strengthening Storm to Threaten Japan

To the east of Typhoon Nari, another storm near Guam is in its initial stages and is expected to become a tropical storm then a typhoon by the weekend.

As with Typhoon Nari, the area of disturbed weather near Guam is in an area ripe for development. Very warm water temperatures, plentiful moisture and a lack of wind shear will contribute to strengthening.

Weak steering winds will prevent this new storm from moving very quickly. A slow track to the north is anticipated through the week and into the weekend as it gains strength.

By early next week, AccuWeather.com meteorologists believe it will be located south and east of Japan. Whether or not the typhoon makes a direct hit on the country depends on a cold front sweeping through northeastern China. If the front is a little slower, the cyclone could make a run at the east coast of Japan.

No matter the exact track, gusty northerly winds will buffet Japan early next week. Residents along the east coast of the country should continue to monitor this situation through the week.

This storm would be named Wipha when it attains tropical storm status. – AccuWeather