escape routes

All posts tagged escape routes

By Jeremiah Johnson – Ready Nutrition

ReadyNutrition Readers, we are becoming “long in the tooth,” so to speak, regarding the current world events.  Some of this article will mention points previously covered, but only in relation to the “big picture” of E&E…that’s the acronym for “Escape & Evasion.”  In the end, no matter how secure your fortress, be it Castle Greyskull or Mount Olympus II, you may have to leave it for one reason or another: fire, radiation, severe flood/hurricane, or the IHM (Incredible Human Mob).

The first thing you need to do is establish your immediate location and route to where you intend to flee if you must.  There are several different types of maps that you should consult, if not own outright, and they are as follows:

  1. Local atlas/road type of map with streets and metropolitan areas readily identified
  2. Topographic map: preferably military (DMA, or Defense Mapping Agency is your source) of the immediate area
  3. Maps from the State/Federal Forestry services for your area

Once you have these resources, then you can accurately identify your route out of there, and your new location to hide/hunker down.  There are some avenues you should specifically consider on your E&E.  Let’s go over them:

  1. Railroad tracks: most of the time, railroads must make their tracks accessible for repair/refitting trucks and equipment.  This usually involves a “built up” area that holds the track, sloped off and then followed by a large “bare” stretch that can hold a vehicle, almost akin to an unpaved “secondary” road.  THE KEY TO THIS IS A SUCCESSFUL RECONNAISSANCE!  You don’t want to drive along such a route and parallel the tracks when the time comes for the first time…only to find you must stop at a railroad bridge that is about a quarter of a mile long…so you don’t do the “Nestea Plunge” into a two-hundred-foot gorge.  That’s a bad thing.  You need to know the whole route…all the way to your final destination.
  2. Rivers: What direction do they flow, in relation to your destination? East-West, or North-South…it makes a big difference and will be specific to your location.  Also, are there any large bodies of water such as a lake or a bay or such in your immediate area?
  3. All the Roads to your Destination: You need all of them…the highway, the road, the firebreak, the dirt trails…every possible conceivable route by vehicle.  Then you need to prioritize them…in numerical order of preference…as to the route you want.  You also must find points where these connect.  For example, you may have as your #1 route an “Interstate Highway 66,” but the bridge is out on part of it.  Where is a jump-off point to #2, #3, or #4 that you can use?  All this needs to be meticulously planned and written down.

Because you may die or be taken out of the picture, and your family will have to appoint a new or temporary “leader” and follow your directions out of there.

  1. Airports: It may just be that you’ll need to fly out of there, either by your own hand or with someone else as a pilot. It may behoove you to know where the nearest aircraft and the nearest pilot (friendly to you and your cause) can be found.
  2. Major Harbor points with access to open ocean: self-explanatory, but once you go there, do you know what you’re looking for? Types of vessels that can hold you and your family, and your entire vehicle?

When you conduct the E&E, will you be taking your entire family with you at once, or will you rendezvous at a location to continue onward?  This second option would mean that each family member traveling separately will need a plan of their own, and then to link up with you to continue the overall plan.  We are now going to pose a series of questions to help you assess where you are at this point in time.

There are some skills that will need to be assessed and then brought into play.  Do you know how to pilot a boat?  Do you have such a boat available for your use, if the time comes?  If not, the moral dilemma: will you commandeer one?  How about seamanship, regarding the open ocean?  Do you have any experience, and do you know how to navigate using only a sextant and compass, without electronic aids?  Do you know how to fly, either VTOL (as in helicopters) or fixed wing aircraft?

Regarding a driven route, do you have at least 3 good viable routes planned for use, with connecting points and checkpoints to enable you to switch from one route to another easily and fluidly?  What are you driving, and how much gear/supplies/equipment will you be taking?  More than one vehicle?  How about fuel?

One thing I’ll tell you about that will be a tremendous help if you can swing it.  A mini bike, all the way up to say a 200-cc dirt bike.  You can throw that bad boy in the back of a pickup and then use it to scout and perform reconnaissance on an area ahead of the “main element” of your family.  Although great on gas, motorcycles are not the most efficient way to get out of dodge as a family, unless you’re one of the Hell’s Angels or a family of Evel Knievel-type daredevils without a lot of gear.

Plan refueling points, rest areas and hide spots (to hunker down) along the way on your routes.  All this planning needed to be done a while ago.  If you’ve planned it out, then good job.  If you haven’t, then this article may be something to stimulate you to act.  That is the whole point: preparation promotes a good follow through.  The key to success is being able to act decisively when the time arrives.  You’ll have to go with your observations and go with your gut on it, according to the situation, making changes and adaptations as you go.  Keep in that good fight, and plan your route to get out of Tombstone before the gunfight at the OK Corral begins.  JJ out!

About the author:

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

 

 

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MapofArea

By Pat Henry – The Prepper Journal

Pop quiz. If you had to leave your neighborhood and the route you normally take was blocked would you have an alternate way out? What if the alternate was blocked? What if all roads out of your neighborhood were blocked by military check-points? Would you have a backup escape route or would you be trapped staring at the lights ahead wishing you had made it out sooner?

Most days when I am driving home from work my mind is on autopilot. I make the turns I normally make, engage my turn signal at the proper time and generally drive the correct speed without even looking at the gauge on my dash. I do this not because I am a robot, but because I have done this so many times the actions are ingrained into my muscle memory. I am sure it is this way for many of you who drive to work every day.

But have you ever stopped to think of your escape routes during an emergency? What if the normal paths you take aren’t available? What if you aren’t even able to take your vehicle? Does your bug out plan allow you to get creative or are you hoping for the best? For those of us who live in more rural/suburban settings, driving our vehicles everywhere is almost taken for granted. We rarely get out and explore the world outside of these paved streets but knowing what is out there could be the key to your survival if you find yourself depending on alternate route options. Knowing your area by foot could save your life in the right circumstances.

Going off-road

Knowing the roads out of your neighborhood is pretty simple and I would bet that most of us have that down already but could you go off-road if the way was blocked? Could you cut across a field or through the back of a neighbor’s yard to get out to another road? Have you ever considered that at all? In a recent post I mentioned the need for a bug out vehicle that had the capability to go off-road and this is a good example where that could be necessary. Maybe it isn’t the road out of your neighborhood, but it is a major road that you would normally take to get out-of-town and it is blocked. A line of cars stretches before you and you can see a roadblock ahead. What do you do now?

Ideally you would have considered all of this well in advance. I routinely go for walks through my neighborhood. Usually I stick to the roads, but there are also trails near where I live so me and the survival dog will check those out from time to time. I live on the outskirts of a decent sized city right in the middle of too many and too few people. A few miles in either direction puts me solidly into rural farmland or the congestion of downtown.

I know the best option is to move but I am where I am for now so my prepping so far has been looking at ways I can avoid getting stuck in a trap should something block our access out.

A creek might make vehicle traffic impossible but it is an alternate way out on foot.

Identify any natural boundaries that could block you in

The area I live in has mild hills around. There is a pretty good-sized creek on my southern border that I would be able to cross on foot if needed, but I also know areas where the banks are low enough to allow a properly equipped 4 wheeler to cross also. Getting across the creek is one obstacle that could give me an alternate way out if all the other methods were blocked.

Continue reading at The Prepper Journal: Know the Alternate Escape Routes from Your Neighborhood

“This article was first published by our friends at reThinkSurvival.com.”

Several weeks ago I was surfing the depths of the Internet (that’s Clickbank if you didn’t know) because, to be honest, I was looking for something interesting and useful to offer you, the reader. Now, I must admit that in the past I’ve avoided both buying anything from Clickbank as well as from offering such products here because I’ve always equated anything I’ve found on Clickbank with used car dealers. Ok, maybe they’re not that bad and, in fact, I’ve changed my opinion about Clickbank products as a result of this experience. And, I should point out that I enjoyed the course enough to signup for the affiliate program.

Long story short, I happened upon David Morris’ website where he immediately starting talking to me, yes, talking to me! And for some reason I stayed a listened… for quite a while at that. I was impressed with what he had to say. I like his calm demeanor and philosophy too. And I wanted to know his thoughts on surviving in place. As such, instead of finding something to offer you, I bought myself.

I immediately got started, both with enthusiasm and skepticism as well. If I remember right, he also tried to up-sell me on something that I ignored so be wary of that if you buy. After logging in, I found that I wasn’t able to access the entire 12 week course properly so I emailed customer support and they got it squared away quickly.

Now I was ready to get going. He offers his course in one week installments over the course of 12 total weeks. The bulk of the course are PDF files to read or you can alternatively choose to listen to him via MP3 audio files (several hours total). I choose to listen in part because I liked listening to him and so that I could multi-task. I did find that he occasionally deviated from the PDF files but not so much so that you couldn’t learn what you needed to from either source. He also sends out weekly emails reminders as well. So, you could choose to do the course as he outlines or all at once.

All-in-all, he covers what’s expected. He talks about why it might not be a great idea to try and leave the city, communications, assessing your risk, 72 hour kits, flu pandemics, chemical and biological attacks, building a team, hardening your house, food storage, lessons learned from Katrina, psychology for survival, urban movement, and other topics. Although I’ve heard a lot of what he had to say from elsewhere, I did actually learn several things that I felt were useful.

Besides the main course you also get an ebook on regaining your privacy online, which was somewhat useful but not nearly as involved or detailed as the Deep Web guide I reviewed a while back. More importantly, you get access to a resources page that usually include pertinent links from each of the lessons, some of which were useful others not so much. Last, there’s a members forum too but that doesn’t seem very busy so I didn’t bother getting involved. There are some other small benefits such as files to work through and what not, but all of this was secondary to the real purpose of my purchase: to learn about surviving in place!

The ultimate question, therefore, was whether or not the money I spent was worthwhile or not? I have two answers…

Answer #1: Considering what I know now, have experienced, as well as all of my research online for this website alone, I would say it’s probably not worth the money with one huge caveat, and that is if you have either been living the prepared lifestyle for many years now or are truly willing to spend the many, many hours of time researching what to do. Granted, this site offers probably most everything you need know (with a grin on my face) but there’s a lot to cover, found in many spots, with hundreds or thousands of pertinent links to many outside references. I understand that’s not to everyone’s liking.

Answer #2: On the other hand, if you’re relatively new to emergency preparedness (and the surviving in place concept in general) and/or you don’t really want to spend hundreds or thousands of hours trying to find what to do, then this course may be a good fit for you. It can all be boiled down to several hours of learning, some actions to take, and, certainly, recommendations for equipment and supplies to purchase.

I should also reiterate that I did learn quite a few interesting tidbits, if you will, from Mr. Morris. I didn’t necessarily agree with everything he had to say and sometimes I wished he would elaborate, but it was useful enough to keep me listening and learning.

Any earthquakes in the Canary Islands should be closely monitored especialy if you live on the east coast of the United States. île Graciosa (Canaries)

Stay up to date on this by following the link.

http://earthquake-report.com/2011/09/25/el-hierro-canary-islands-spain-volcanic-risk-alert-increased-to-yellow/

This is a great bit of information and something everyone needs to remember when prepping for disasters. As always there are lots of things to consider when prepping and you need to make plans for all types of situations and circumstances. Most disasters have the basic same preparations so once you get your base prepping done you can then prep for specific situations and scenarios.

English: A composed satellite photograph of No...

English: A composed satellite photograph of North America in orthographic projection. The observer is centered at (40° N, 95° W), at Moon distance above the Earth. Español: Imagen de satélite de América del Norte (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

If you could live in any state in America, where would you go?  During troubled times like these, what is the best place in the United States to live?  A lot of people are asking these kinds of questions these days.  Our economy is on the verge of collapse, natural disasters are becoming more frequent and more intense, the U.S. population is becoming angrier and more frustrated by the day, our government has become incredibly oppressive and controlling, war could break out at any time and evidence that society is breaking down is all around us.  As our world becomes increasingly unstable, many families are considering moving somewhere else.  But what areas are best and what areas should be avoided?  Is there really a “best place to live” in America?  Well, the truth is that each family is facing a different set of circumstances.  If you have a great support system where you live, it can be really tough to pick up and move 3000 miles away from that support system.  If you have a great job where you live now, it can be really tough to move some place where there may be no job at all for you.  But without a doubt there are some areas of the country that will be far better off than others in the event of a major economic collapse.  This article will take a look at each of the 50 U.S. states and will list some of the pros and cons for moving to each one.

Not all of the factors listed below will be important to you, and a few have even been thrown in for humor.  But if you are thinking of moving in the near future hopefully this list will give you some food for thought.

A few years ago when my wife and I were living near Washington D.C. we knew that we wanted a change and we went through this kind of a process.  We literally evaluated areas from coast to coast.  In the end, we found a place that is absolutely perfect for us.  But different things are important to different people.

And if I gave your particular state a low rating, please don’t think that I am trashing the entire state or all of the people who live there.

For example, there are some absolutely wonderful people that live in the state of California, and there are some areas of California that I would not mind visiting at all.  But for the times that are coming I am convinced that it is going to be a really bad place to live.

Not that I have all the answers either.  Hopefully this article can get some debates started, and hopefully those debates will help people that are thinking of moving to another state to be more informed.

The following are some pros and cons for all 50 states….

Alabama

Pros: warm weather, southern hospitality, relatively low population density

Cons: hurricanes, tornadoes, crime, not enough jobs, multiple nuclear power plants, rampant poverty

Overall Rating: C+

Alaska

Pros: great fishing, lots of empty space, low population density, great for rugged individualists

Cons: very high cost of living, earthquakes, volcanoes, extremely cold, short growing season, too much snow, potentially cut off from supplies from the lower 48 states during an emergency situation

Overall Rating: B

Arizona

Pros: warm weather

Cons: illegal immigration, wildfires, return of dust bowl conditions, not enough jobs, not enough rain, multiple nuclear power plants, crime, gang violence, Phoenix

Overall Rating: D+

Arkansas

Pros: southern hospitality, warm weather, Ozark National Forest

Cons: tornadoes, Clintons, New Madrid fault zone, multiple nuclear power plants, crime, rampant poverty

Overall Rating: C

California

Pros: Disneyland, warm weather, Malibu

Cons: high taxes, Jerry Brown, earthquakes, mudslides, wildfires, gang violence, crime, traffic, rampant poverty, insane politicians, ridiculous regulations, bad schools, political correctness, illegal immigration, not enough jobs, air pollution, multiple nuclear power plants, possible tsunami threat along the coast, Los Angeles, San Francisco, Oakland, Stockton, Sacramento, huge drug problem, high population density, the state government is broke, many more reasons to leave California right here

Overall Rating: F

Colorado

Pros: Rocky Mountains, Colorado Springs

Cons: wildfires, illegal immigration, short growing season, not enough rain, too much snow, huge drug problem

Overall Rating: B

Connecticut

Pros: beautiful homes

Cons: high taxes, insane politicians, ridiculous regulations, political correctness, short growing season, multiple nuclear power plants, high population density

Overall Rating: C-

Delaware

Pros: good fishing

Cons: Joe Biden, political correctness, ridiculous regulations, insane politicians, crime, high population density

Overall Rating: D

Florida

Pros: University of Florida Gators, oranges, low taxes, southern hospitality, Disneyworld, Gainesville, warm weather, beautiful beaches, Daytona

Cons: hurricanes, most of the state is barely above sea level, high population density, not enough jobs, multiple nuclear power plants, crime, gang violence, illegal immigration

Overall Rating: C

Georgia

Pros: peaches, southern hospitality, warm weather

Cons: not enough jobs, multiple nuclear power plants, crime, gang violence, flesh eating disease, Atlanta

Overall Rating: B-

Hawaii

Pros: awesome beaches, warm weather, great vacation destination

Cons: vulnerable to tsunamis, very high cost of living, volcanoes, traffic, high population density, high taxes

Overall Rating: C-

Idaho

Pros: awesome people live there, great potatoes, low population density, high concentration of liberty-minded individuals, low crime, Sandpoint, Coeur d’Alene, north Idaho has plenty of water compared to the rest of the interior West, beautiful scenery

Cons: cold in the winter, wildfires, short growing season, not enough jobs

Overall Rating: A

Illinois

Pros: once you get away from Chicago things are not quite so bad

Cons: Barack Obama, drought, New Madrid fault zone, high population density, political correctness, ridiculous regulations, insane politicians, crime, gang violence, Chicago, East St. Louis, not enough jobs, multiple nuclear power plants, mob robberies, the state government is drowning in debt

Overall Rating: D-

Indiana

Pros: it is in better shape than Illinois, good farming, high Amish population

Cons: drought, tornadoes, the city of Gary, relatively high population density, near the New Madrid fault zone, a “rust belt” state

Overall Rating: C-

Iowa

Pros: low population density, low crime, good farming

Cons: drought, tornadoes, cold in the winter, multiple nuclear power plants, too much snow, very flat

Overall Rating: B-

Kansas

Pros: low population density, low crime, good farming

Cons: drought, tornadoes, return of dust bowl conditions, very flat

Overall Rating: B

Kentucky

Pros: southern hospitality, great horses, Lexington

Cons: New Madrid fault zone, not enough jobs, rampant poverty, Louisville

Overall Rating: C

Louisiana

Pros: southern hospitality, warm weather

Cons: hurricanes, New Orleans, not enough jobs, tornadoes, multiple nuclear power plants, oil spills, crime, gang violence, rampant poverty

Overall Rating: D

Maine

Pros: low population density, low crime, polite people

Cons: extremely cold, short growing season, political correctness, ridiculous regulations, insane politicians, too much snow

Overall Rating: B-

Maryland

Pros: the Washington Redskins play there

Cons: Baltimore, borders Washington D.C., high population density, really bad traffic, political correctness, ridiculous regulations, insane politicians, multiple nuclear power plants, crime, gang violence

Overall Rating: C-

Massachusetts

Pros: beautiful homes

Cons: high taxes, political correctness, ridiculous regulations, insane politicians, high population density, short growing season, almost everything is illegal in Massachusetts

Overall Rating: D+

Michigan

Pros: once you get away from Detroit and Flint things get better

Cons: Detroit, Flint, Dearborn, extremely cold, short growing season, political correctness, ridiculous regulations, insane politicians, not enough jobs, multiple nuclear power plants, too much snow, a “rust belt” state

Overall Rating: D-

Minnesota

Pros: land of 10,000 lakes

Cons: extremely cold, short growing season, multiple nuclear power plants, too much snow, high taxes

Overall Rating: C

Mississippi

Pros: southern hospitality, relatively low population density, warm weather

Cons: hurricanes, tornadoes, not enough jobs, rampant poverty, crime

Overall Rating: C+

Missouri

Pros: good farming, Branson

Cons: drought, tornadoes, New Madrid fault zone, not enough jobs, crime

Overall Rating: C

Montana

Pros: low population density, low taxes, high concentration of liberty-minded individuals, Missoula, Kalispell

Cons: extremely cold in the winter, wildfires, short growing season, not enough rain, near Yellowstone super volcano, rampant poverty, too much snow

Overall Rating: B+

Nebraska

Pros: low population density, good farming

Cons: tornadoes, drought, multiple nuclear power plants, cold in the winter, very flat

Overall Rating: B

Nevada

Pros: low population density, lots of empty space, low taxes, warm weather

Cons: Harry Reid, Las Vegas, Reno, not enough water, not enough rain, wildfires, hard to grow food, not enough jobs, crime, gang violence, huge drug problem, Yucca Mountain

Overall Rating: D+

New Hampshire

Pros: low crime, beautiful homes

Cons: extremely cold, short growing season, political correctness, ridiculous regulations, insane politicians, too much snow

Overall Rating: C

New Jersey

Pros: anyone got something?

Cons: high population density, Camden, Newark, not enough jobs, multiple nuclear power plants, Atlantic City, crime, gang violence

Overall Rating: D-

New Mexico

Pros: low population density, warm weather

Cons: illegal immigration, wildfires, return of dust bowl conditions, not enough jobs, not enough rain, crime, gang violence, huge drug problem

Overall Rating: C-

New York

Pros: the entire state is not like New York City

Cons: New York City, Mayor Bloomberg, high taxes, cold in the winter, high population density, political correctness, ridiculous regulations, insane politicians, not enough jobs, multiple nuclear power plants, the “too big to fail” banks

Overall Rating: D

North Carolina

Pros: southern hospitality, warm weather, Great Smoky Mountains National Park

Cons: hurricanes, not enough jobs, multiple nuclear power plants

Overall Rating: B

North Dakota

Pros: low crime, lots of oil-related jobs, low population density

Cons: extremely cold, short growing season, too much snow

Overall Rating: B

Ohio

Pros: the Cincinnati Reds, the Pro Football Hall of Fame, high Amish population

Cons: not enough jobs, cold in the winter, multiple nuclear power plants, high population density, Toledo, Cleveland, a “rust belt” state

Overall Rating: C

Oklahoma

Pros: warm weather, good farming

Cons: drought, tornadoes, wildfires, return of dust bowl conditions, not enough rain, crime, Oklahoma City, rampant poverty

Overall Rating: C

Oregon

Pros: tremendous natural beauty

Cons: high taxes, Portland, political correctness, ridiculous regulations, insane politicians, not enough jobs, huge drug problem, possible tsunami threat along the coast

Overall Rating: C-

Pennsylvania

Pros: high Amish population

Cons: high population density, Pennsylvania, Pittsburgh, not enough jobs, multiple nuclear power plants, a “rust belt” state

Overall Rating: C

Rhode Island

Pros: so small that most people don’t notice their problems

Cons: the state is flat broke, short growing season, political correctness, ridiculous regulations, insane politicians, not enough jobs, high population density

Overall Rating: D+

South Carolina

Pros: southern hospitality, warm weather, Myrtle Beach

Cons: hurricanes, not enough jobs, multiple nuclear power plants, crime, gang violence, rampant poverty

Overall Rating: B

South Dakota

Pros: low population density, fun tourist traps, the Badlands, Mount Rushmore

Cons: extremely cold, short growing season, very flat, too much snow

Overall Rating: B

Tennessee

Pros: Nashville, Michael W. Smith, southern hospitality, warm weather, Gatlinburg

Cons: Memphis, New Madrid fault zone, multiple nuclear power plants, crime, gang violence, rampant poverty

Overall Rating: B-

Texas

Pros: low taxes, warm weather, Austin

Cons: drought, illegal immigration, tornadoes, wildfires, West Nile Virus, the Dallas Cowboys, return of dust bowl conditions, speed traps, not enough rain, multiple nuclear power plants, George W. Bush, crime

Overall Rating: B-

Utah

Pros: beautiful mountains, low crime, low population density

Cons: cold in the winter, wildfires, Salt Lake City, short growing season, not enough rain, illegal to collect rain

Overall Rating: B-

Vermont

Pros: low crime, beautiful homes

Cons: cold in the winter, insane politicians, ridiculous regulations, short growing season, political correctness, not enough jobs, too much snow

Overall Rating: C

Virginia

Pros: the University of Virginia, southern hospitality, Charlottesville

Cons: borders Washington D.C., high population density, multiple nuclear power plants, Richmond, really bad traffic in northern Virginia

Overall Rating: B-

Washington

Pros: the eastern half of the state is quite nice and much different from the coast

Cons: way too much rain along the coast, volcanoes, wildfires, insane politicians, ridiculous regulations, political correctness, not enough jobs, possible tsunami threat along the coast, Seattle

Overall Rating: C

West Virginia

Pros: beautiful mountains

Cons: not enough jobs, rampant poverty

Overall Rating: B

Wisconsin

Pros: cheese, the Green Bay Packers

Cons: extremely cold, short growing season, multiple nuclear power plants, too much snow,

Overall Rating: B-

Wyoming

Pros: low population density, lots of empty space, low taxes

Cons: extremely cold, too windy, too flat, wildfires, short growing season, not enough rain, Yellowstone super volcano

Overall Rating: B-

What do you think of these rankings?

What do you think is the best place to live in America?

Do you have any additional pros and cons that should be added to this list?

This article first appeared here at the Economic Collapse.

Français : Panneau d'évacuation en cas de Tsun...

Français : Panneau d’évacuation en cas de Tsunami, en Nouvelle Zélande. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

With recent seismic activity going on around the world and with such a large portion of the world’s population living on or near the coastline Tsunamis pose a considerable threat to human life.

These seismic waves sometimes called “Tidal Waves” or Tsunamis can move hundreds of miles per hour in the open ocean and are typically caused by underwater disturbances such as earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, landslides and less frequently meteorite impacts. Tsunamis travel out in all directions from the point where they originate and as they approach land build in height as the floor of the ocean meets the shoreline. These waves can be as high as 100ft or more with the right conditions and can destroy all in its path. What can be a small Tsunami in one place can cause massive destruction in another depending on the topography of the ocean floor and coastline.

All Tsunamis are potentially dangerous and warnings should always be taken very seriously. When earthquakes or landslides occur close to the coastline the first waves can reach the shoreline within a few minutes, even before warnings can be issued and communicated to the general public. The greatest risk zone would be that of areas less than 25ft above sea level and within 1 mile of the shoreline.

Here is a list of things you can do to protect yourself and family from a Tsunami;

  • Build an Emergency Kit or Bug-Out-Bag that’s ready to go if you need to evacuate in a hurry.
  • Make a Family Evacuation Plan and practice it with all members of your family so they all know what to do and where to go if a tsunami occurs. You should be able to follow your escape route night or day and be able to reach your safe location within 10-15 minutes by foot. Evacuating by car may not be an option due to roads being clogged or blocked by other people fleeing.
  • Know your town, city or communities warning system, disaster plans and evacuation routes. In other words know where you need to go to be safe and how to get there in a hurry.
  • If you are on vacation familiarize yourself with local evacuation plans and locations.
  • Know the height of your home or location above sea level and the distance you are from the coast, evacuation orders may be based on these factors.
  • Follow any and all evacuation orders given by local authorities and evacuate immediately. Save yourself, family and pets but leave your possessions behind, they can be replaced.
  • Under no circumstances go down to the beach to watch the tsunami come in, this may be the last stupid decision of your life.
  • If you see a noticeable recession in water away from the shoreline this is nature’s tsunami warning and you need to move away immediately.
  • Move inland to higher ground away from the coastline immediately. Try to get 100 feet above sea level or go as far inland as you can. Get as high and as far as you can, every foot inland or upward may make the difference between life and death.
  • If you can see the wave and it is too close to escape get as high in a multi-level reinforced concrete building as you can, this is a last resort and may not save your life but it’s better than being at ground level when the wave hits. Try to be at least 3-4 floors up inside the building.
  • Remember to help those who may require special assistance such as the elderly, infants and the disabled.

Remember that when you have to evacuate you’ll need supplies, so be sure to have your emergency kit or bug-out-bag stocked and ready to go. Remember to include things like extra clothing, important documents, prescription medications, first-aid supplies, food, water, portable radio and other personal and hygiene items. There are lots of pre-made kits on the market which makes this is a great option to get you a base kit and then you can add your own personal touches to create something that fits your personal needs.

After a tsunami return home only after local officials tell you it is safe. If you feel it is unsafe to remain in your home go to a designated public shelter for further assistance.  Avoid disaster areas and stay away from debris in the water, it may pose a safety hazard to people or pets due to contamination or unseen hazards. Always use caution when re-entering your home or other buildings due to possible structural damage that can cause floors to crack or walls to collapse. To avoid any injuries, wear protective clothing and be cautious when cleaning up.

Hopefully by following these tips and suggestions you and your family will feel safe and secure to make it through a tsunami if you ever find yourself in this situation. The best thing to do is to be prepared and have a plan so you will have the confidence and ability to survive.

Author: The Survival Guy

Source: https://thesurvivalplaceblog.com