Camping

All posts tagged Camping

Plenty to see and do but will the kids agree? Picture source

By Staff Writer – The Survival Place Blog

Children are great fun to be around. At least, that is until they get tired, hungry, bored, or frustrated. Then the fun ends, and you’re in survival mode trying to get through the minutes it takes to address their needs and soothe them back to fun mode. It’s not easy to spend a long vacation with kids. It’s even harder to make it through a camping trip. Here are just a few tips to help you survive your first camping vacation with your little ones:

Survive Boredom

The things that you love are definitely not the things your kids love. It doesn’t matter how badly you want to share your passion for fishing, the thrill of reaching the peak of that mountain, or the pleasure of foraging for food. You’re not going to convince them to share those feelings until they are ready. But while you’re pursuing your interests your kids are going to succumb to boredom. That’s when it can get really tough for all of you.

Electronic devices are the mainstay for kids these days but usually rendered useless when you’re out camping. Engage your children in plenty of activities and games that are relatively simple and short. The younger they are, the shorter the attention span. To keep it fun, you have to engage in that activity at their level. You’re going to need a lot of energy for that! Try building a den, hunting for fairies, and playing pinecone bowling.

Surviving Fussy Eaters

Camping is a struggle for fussy eaters. It doesn’t feel right for grownups to take bags of chips. They want to cook sausages and bacon and beans. If your kids are fussy, chances are they’re still quite young. Why not let them have a go at helping you prepare the meal? Safety is essential, so have a second adult nearby to help you.

You might not be keen to show them how to make a fire just yet, so use something like the everstryke pro. It will be quicker to get things going and will reduce the risk of injury or dangerous fire making. Next, you can ask your child to pour the beans or soup into the pot. You might prefer to place the pot on the campfire or stove. If you hold the handle, your little one might be happy to stir with a wooden spoon (wearing oven gloves or other safety equipment.) It’s amazing how much more fun it is to eat something when you’re prepared it yourself!

Surviving Bad Weather Misery

Kids hate being cooped up. If the weather is so bad you have to stay in the tent, make sure you have plenty of things to hand to keep them occupied. A coloring book, reading books, board games, and puzzles can all be handy here. Make up a game, or write a story together. Traditional games like charades can be fun here too.

Of course, if you have plenty of wet weather gear, then this might be the perfect opportunity for splashing about in muddy puddles. Sure, you’re all going to get a bit messy and a bit damp. Just head over to the shower blocks when you’re done. Kids don’t care about getting dirty. The fact you do care makes it so much more fun to do it!

Surviving The Long Hike With Little Legs

Taking a long walk is an essential part of any camping trip. The trouble is, those with the littlest legs don’t move so fast. And they’re the ones that tire quickly and want to be carried the rest of the way. It’s important you pitch your camping trip at the right level for the participants. If you have tiny tots, you’re going to have to carry them or walk shorter distances. It can’t be helped.

There are some very good carriers if your child is still toddling. They are quite comfortable for parent and passenger alike and allow you to walk as far as you want without your child getting tired. And if they want to sleep it will make no difference to you. Be wary of tough terrain though. Your balance and your weight will be altered!

Surviving Night Time Bathroom Breaks

It’s not often you get to pitch your tent close to the facilities you need most when you have kids with you. Night time is the worst time to need to go. However, it’s pretty much guaranteed your little one will want to go during the night. Torches and easy footwear are essential. The next problem is convincing a small child to walk out of the tent in the middle of the night to go and find the bathroom. Even with you, it can be a scary thing to do for a tiny tot.

Don’t fuel their fears if they’re nervous out in the open. Picture source

If your child is frightened, they might simply refuse. A wet sleeping bag is a disaster! Always carry a spare one, and make sure you know where laundry services are in the morning. Potties can be helpful or the portaloos you can get with camper vans. Still, it’s not pleasant for the rest of you in the tent, and hygiene could be a real problem. Try to make the excursion from the tent a fun adventure and nothing to worry about.

Surviving Insect Invasions

Kids really don’t like flies, roaches, spiders or other insects. Of course, if you’re going to sleep in their territory, there is little you can do about it. That said, it’s important to prevent bites and stings. A child-friendly insect repellent might help here. Make sure you’ve packed a full first aid kit that includes sting relief, bandages, plasters, and antibacterial creams. You might need extra tissues for the tearies too.

Camping should be fun for all the family, but you might have to give up some of the activities you would normally do on your own. Introduce new things one at a time. Little ones can become quite frightened by strange environments and noises. Bring a comforter, and get ready for the biggest adventure in parenthood so far!

 

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By The Survival Place Blog

Are you planning on taking a trip into the wilderness for your next vacation? Then, you need to be prepared for everything that the elements can throw at you. You might think that it’s easy to survive the outdoors. Particularly, if you’re heading to a place that you know quite well. But you might be surprised because the weather can turn at any moment leaving you in trouble. For instance, you might be camping miles from the nearest point of civilization. Imagine, if fog falls thick and low over the ground. You would struggle to find your way back and would need to rely on the kit that you had with you. If you didn’t have enough supplies, you might find the next few days incredibly difficult. So, what do you need to survive camping in the wilderness?

A Portable Heater

You may want to consider purchasing a portable heater for camping in the wilderness with a good supply of fuel. It does depend on whether you’re traveling on foot or in the car. You might also want to consider whether you’ll be moving around a lot. That said if you’re camping a portable heater can be incredibly useful. Particularly, if you are camping in the winter. If you don’t take a portable heater, you need to make sure you have a survival sleeping bag. The best sleeping bag has a hood to keep you warm, even when the temperature has dropped below freezing outside. It’s possible with the best sleeping bags to stay warm and dry even without a tent!

A Compass

There are two things you’ll need to make sure that you don’t get completely lost wandering in the wilderness. The first is a map and the second is a compass. Ideally, you should have adequate orienteering skills to make sure that you can find your way back to camp. However, even if you don’t, with a compass, you should always be able to find your way back where you started. By knowing what direction your campsite is, you’ll always be able to find your way back to the starting point. You will even find some winter jackets come with compasses included on them. This shows how important that piece of kit is. You might also want to think about some night vision goggles. Night monoculars will allow you to see for miles even when it’s pitch black. You’ll always find your camp site with these and you can check out a review on a site such as www.opticscastle.com/night-vision-monocular-reviews/

 

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Axe

Make sure you have a device or tool that you can use to chop down wood. In extreme situations, you might need to collect wood for shelter or even to supply fuel for a fire. Be aware that to make a good shelter or fire the wood has to be dry. If it’s not, it won’t light, and you’ll struggle to keep your body temperature at a normal level. You might be camping in an area where it is illegal to cut down trees. However, if it is a matter of survival, be prepared to ignore rules like this. Your safety should always be the top priority.

Tracker
Finally, this is another useful tool that you can find on most winter, explorer jackets. Check out some of the latest winter jackets on http://snowboarding.transworld.net/news/oneill-launches-gps-jacket/.  A small tracker is embedded in the material. When pressed it will send a signal to the closest rescue team. They will then be able to track your exact location and avoid you being lost in the wilderness for days.

This article first appeared at The Survival Place Blog: Tech And Tips You Need Camping In The Wilderness

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By The Survival Place Blog

The stereotype of preppers is one that very much doesn’t fit the reality a lot of us live in. Many will imagine that we’re loners without families. In reality, a lot of us have kids and spouses who we’re keen to protect as much as ourselves if not more. So, as a prepper with a family, you need to start preparing them, too. It just so happens to be that there are plenty of activities you can get into year round to help with that.

Real camping

An obvious activity to get into is camping. There are plenty of great spots for it. But we’re not talking about the places with running water and electricity within five feet. To really benefit from camping, you need to go as wild as you can. You need to teach your family to create rope from nature, how useful a knife is for first aid and cooking and how to really thrive in the wild.

Traversing those waters

Being near water when out in the wild is important. Being able to move over it is even better. If cars and public transport fail, then water is one of the best ways to travel. Look up the best sit on top kayak and get practicing. It helps a lot that kayaking is one of the most fun ways to spend your time in the water.

Nature hikes

When you’re not camping, considering taking the family to see some of the most beautiful environments that nature has to offer. But don’t just take the sights in. Learn them. Consider using apps to start identifying different plants. There are those with harmful properties as well as helpful ones. Not to mention all kinds of foodstuffs that could be foraged when needed. Make your hikes a much more educational experience. That knowledge of nature is something we’ve been lacking for far too long.

A good fishing trip

As important as nature is, it’s also important we learn how to sustain ourselves from it. Fishing has that obvious benefit. But it’s also a great way to teach your kids some important values. Values like patience and dedication. It also serves as a time to spend one-to-one with your kids. The intimate peace of a fishing trip can be a tremendous force in building lasting bonds.

Winter building

Not every activity is best done in Spring and Summer. Camping is one thing, but it’s not enough in the Winter. Yet Winter can be one of the most magical times to get out in nature. So take your kids somewhere you can all practice building a Winter shelter together. Build yourself a cozy space where you can sit inside with your family and watch the landscape fill up with snow. The kids are guaranteed to love it and you’re guaranteed a skill that could one day be the deciding factor for your survival.

What we consider recreation was once essential for survival. If the world we know changes (as it has before and will again), they might be essential still. Make sure your family is as prepared as you.

This article first appeared at The Survival Place Blog: Family Fun That Doubles As The Preparedness Training You Need

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Image Source: Pixabay.com

By The Survival Place Blog

Once you become a parent, you enter a whole new zone. And as much as it’s fun thrilling and happy, sometimes it’s all about survival too!  Kids are notoriously difficult to please. And they might be as good as gold one minute, but they go into serious meltdown mode the next. And don’t we just love them for it! But sometimes it can be exasperating and stressful too. And never is that exasperation more present than when trying to work out where to go on a vacation as a family.

Ever Considered An RV Adventure?

Luxury hotels are wonderful, but sometimes they are best enjoyed as a couple. Especially if you have young kids in tow. Quite frankly they’re not going to care about marble bathrooms and Egyptian cotton sheets. They much prefer outdoor adventure, playgrounds, splashing in the pool and campfires at night. This is why it’s worth considering buying a luxury travel suite so that you can enjoy the flexibility and freedom on offer. Take to the open road whenever you want and have all their creature comforts available inside. Fluffy bunnies, DVD’s, their favorite games and all their books can come with them. And don’t forget emergency supplies of food. And there’s something ever beautiful knowing you’re on the road ready to take on a big adventure. And to survive? It may be bad but take Haribo and potato chips. Use films to keep them occupied. Bargain away with ice lollies and spending money. Remember that the iPad is your new best friend. And pack a couple of bicycles so they can have lots of outdoor fun!

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Family Friendly RV Campsites

So what are some of the best RV resorts when traveling with a family?

Enota RV Campground, Georgia

This place is perfect for kids and adults alike. It’s located in the Chattahoochee National Forest and close to plenty of waterfalls and streams perfect for outdoor swimming. There are fire pits and campfires, and you can really get to enjoy the outdoor scenery with the kids, and maybe even teach them some survival skills of their own!  You can go fishing and hiking, and enjoy the organic farm, where kids can learn all about life in the great outdoors. And bonus, there are three ground trampolines which will wear them out, just in time for you to enjoy a glass of wine by the fire in the evening.

Copper Johns Resort, Arkansas

Want to get your kids back to nature and give them a great big slice of beauty and fresh air? Then head to Copper Johns resort, Arkansas. Here you can spend your days fishing on White River, all having some good quality family fun together. There’s plenty to do here including boating, scuba diving, wakeboarding, and swimming. The focus is all on an outdoor adventure in beautiful surrounds.

Fort Wilderness Resort, Disney

Sometimes, we’ve just got to go with what the kid’s dream of this year why not let their imagination run wild at Disney! The Fort Wilderness Resort recreates the timeless beauty of the American Frontier. There are great entertainment and fantastic swimming pools. And as a survival bonus, it’s close enough to Disney to enjoy all the theme parks on offer. On top of that, there is also archery, horse riding, and waterslides too!

This article first appeared at The Survival Place Blog: Surviving Vacation With The Kids: Family-Friendly RV Camps

Image source: famzee.com

Image source: famzee.com

By  Susan Patterson Off The Grid News

If you have never taken your kids on a camping trip, it is time to reconsider. They joys of spending time together in nature with the ones you love are immeasurable.

Camping is a great time to reconnect with each other, especially in this age laden with technology. Gathering around a campfire, working together to put up a tent and eating meals under the stars, just brings everyone closer together.

Here are just a few reasons why you should consider taking a camping trip with you family:

Continue reading at Off The Grid News: Why Every Family Should Take At Least One Camping Trip

Tick season

By SurvivoPedia

Now that the weather is warmer and sunnier, the grass is green again and the flowers are in full bloom, it’s a great time to go hiking and camping again. It’s also the perfect time for different types of bugs to stretch their legs and wings and start looking for prey.

That’s why today we’re going to talk about ticks since they are especially active from April through September and one of their prey is…well, us! It’s not necessary for a tick bite to become an emergency, but many of them carry a lot of diseases from tick-borne meningoencephalitis to Lyme disease, a disease that it’s not only crippling but really hard to detect due to its confusing symptoms. That’s why ticks deserve a lot of attention, and that’s exactly what we’re gonna give them today.

We’ll discuss everything you need to know about how to avoid ticks while being outdoorsy this spring and summer, what to do in case one gets on you and how to deal with its bite in both a normal situation and in a post-SHTF scenario.

Continue reading at SurvivoPedia: Danger In The Grass: How To Survive Tick Season

Four Deadly Poisonous Snakes in America

By Ken Jorgustin

For your safety, know these 4 poisonous (venomous) snakes, and what they look like – to avoid being bitten by one.

There are thousands of types (species) of snakes in the world, while more than one hundred species are found in North America – and some of them are poisonous (venomous).

The poisonous (venomous) snakes of North America fall into two groups:
Coral Snakes and Pit Vipers (which include Rattlesnakes, Cottonmouth, & Copperhead)

(UPDATED)

 
First, know that snakes only bite when they are provoked (typically), or when you’ve unknowingly startled them. By simply leaving them alone, you should be okay.

These dangerous snakes have a heat-sensitive sensory organ on each side of the head that enables them to locate warm-blooded prey and strike accurately, even in the dark.

 

Copperhead

Copperhead Snake

The Copperhead, a pit viper, widespread throughout the United States, is responsible for most of the venomous bites.

Copperhead bites are painful, but rarely pose a serious threat to human life.

However, anyone who is bitten by a Copperhead should still seek medical attention as soon as possible.

They are usually a tan to copper color, but can vary widely based on region.

Common are the patches of hourglass markings on its back and their copper-colored triangular looking head.

The Copperhead typically ranges from Massachusetts to Nebraska to Texas and the south-east United States.

 

 

Coral Snake

Coral Snake

The coral snake is the most toxic of the four on this list.

It’s venom is a powerful neurotoxin and unless you get prompt snake bite treatment, the bite will shut down your nervous system, your heart will stop beating, and you will likely die.

The coral snake is identified by the red, yellow and black bands that ring the length of its body, and it has a blunt black snout.

The Coral snake colors are always red, then yellow (thinner band), then black.

Coral snakes and the similar looking (but harmless) King snake (red snout), are often mistaken for each other.

Here’ how to remember:

“Red touch yellow, kill a fellow.” (Deadly Coral snake)
“Red touch black, friend of Jack.” (Harmless King snake)

The Eastern Coral Snake typically ranges from North Carolina through Florida and along Mississippi.

The Western Coral Snake typically ranges in Arizona.

The Texas Coral Snake typically ranges in (yes, you guessed it — Texas). Also Arkansas and Louisiana.

 

 

Cottonmouth

Cottonmouth Snake

The Cottonmouth, also called “water moccasin”, is an aggressively fast, nasty, cranky pit viper with large venom glands.

They have a thick, heavy body and are brown, olive to grayish/black with a flat-topped head.

The Cottonmouth’s bite is far more serious than that of the Copperhead and can be fatal.

When annoyed, the Cottonmouth tends to stand its ground and may gape repeatedly at an intruder, exposing the light “cotton” lining of its mouth.

The Cottonmouth typically ranges from Virginia to Florida to Texas to Missouri.

 

 

Rattlesnake

Rattlesnake

Probably the best known snake in the world, the Rattlesnake is a pit viper found almost everywhere in the United States, and is capable of a deadly bite.

Its trademark rattle strikes fear into anyone who hears it.

With their huge pair of fangs, and while there are many varieties of rattlesnakes,

The Eastern Diamondback Rattlesnake… Give this rattlesnake a wide berth; it is the most dangerous snake in North America! Although the venom of this species is similar to that of most rattlers (and less potent drop-for-drop than that of the coral snakes), a large Eastern Diamondback is capable of delivering a large amount of venom deep into the flesh of its victims. This snake is also known for standing its ground when threatened. They range from North Carolina to Florida. Also Mississippi and Louisiana.

The Western Diamondback is one of the more deadly rattlers, nearly as much as the Eastern Diamondback, and is most often visualized from pictures and Western movies. They range from California to Arkansas to Mexico.

The Timber Rattlesnake is in abundance and ranges from the northeast through Florida, Minnesota and Texas, and is commonly found on Wooded hillsides and rocky outcrops. It has a slightly more laid back reputation but make no mistake, it is deadly.

 
A Field Guide to Venomous Animals and Poisonous Plants

 
United States Range Map: Copperhead, Cottonmouth, Coral Snake

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Continue Reading at Modern Survival Blog: 4 Deadly Poisonous (Venomous) Snakes in America