Bushcraft Skills

All posts tagged Bushcraft Skills

man in the wilderness in the winter

By Nick O’LawModern Survival Online

Bushcraft is the art of living in a natural environment, within and in harmony with nature. It is distinct from (though it shares a lot with) survival, where the mindset is only about getting out at the other end as safely as possible. Bushcraft will teach you skills not just to survive, but to thrive in comfort, and rely not on your gear, but yourself. This is a list of the skills you will need.

Finding and Purifying Water

Water is almost certainly the very first thing to worry about when learning bushcraft. The rule of three gives you a maximum of three days without water, which goes down to one in very hot, arid conditions. Remember that even once you have found water, in most cases it will then need at least to be filtered and possibly distilled or boiled before it is safe to drink.

Finding water is often just a matter of understanding your surroundings well, such as knowing that water flows downhill, so valleys and gullies are always a good start. Humans are only animals, and all other animals need water too, so following animal trails or watching for birds flying quickly (they fly slower after drinking, because they are heavier) are also good strategies.

There are many, many different ways to purify water, and there is not space here to do justice to all of them, but suffice it to say that filtering will remove only the larger particles, distilling will get rid of smaller stuff, and boiling will kill bacteria. Sometimes all three may be needed.

Finding Food

There are three ways to find food in the wild: foraging, hunting and trapping. Foraging is by far the easiest to learn, and is likely to produce the most reward.

Continue reading at Modern Survival Online: The Definitive Bushcraft Skills List

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bushcraft

By Nicholas – Modern Survival Online

Bushcraft’ is a word that gets thrown around very often in the survival community, but it’s also a word that far fewer people understand it. A truly skilled survivalist is someone who can use resources provided by nature exclusively to survive.

For example, instead of using matches or a lighter to start a fire, onewould use a more primitive method using natural materials such as the bow drill method for it to be considered bushcraft.

Ask yourself this: if you were stranded out in the wilderness tomorrow with nothing but the clothes on your back and could only use completely natural resources to survive, would you be able to?

If your honest answer is no, then you will probably find the information presented in this article useful. We are going to provide you with a definitive list of bushcraft skills that will allow you to survive in the wilderness using no man-made materials whatsoever.

THE BOW DRILL METHOD

Everyone knows how important fire is in any survival situation. But not everyone is capable of starting a fire without a flint striker, lighter, or matches. It’s imperative that you learn a way to start a fire without any of those kinds of fire starting devices.

Continue reading at Modern Survival Onloine: The Definitive List of Bushcraft Skills

herbal medicine chest

By The Bug Out Bag Guide

One of the most important things to stock in your home and pack in your bug out bag is your first aid kit. One way to keep your first aid kit full when bugging out is to learn herbal medicine foraging skills so you can identify and harvest useful natural remedies as you move.  A person’s health is, after all, essential to survival and should always be a top priority no matter what the situation is.

In this article we are going to teach you how to find and use 12 life saving herbs that can be used to treat illnesses, alleviate pain, and give you energy. The best part is that ALL of them can be grown at home of found in the wild at little to no cost!

Continue reading at The Bug Out Bag Guide: Primitive Skills: Herbal Medicine Foraging & Uses

how to predict the weather

By  – The Bug Out Bag Guide

Typically we count on weather services and electronic devices to know what to expect from the sky. We may alter travel plans, make a quick trip to the store, or simply pack an umbrella in reaction to an impending storm. However, these services will likely come to a halt if disaster strikes and alternative means of monitoring weather conditions will be necessary. For those that opt to head for the hills, it will become vastly more important to know how to predict the weather in the wilderness.

Nature itself provides many clues as to what is in store. The clouds, plants, animals, insects, and the moon have been used for centuries to predict precipitation, droughts, and floods. Farmers, fishermen, sailors, and others who spend long periods of time outdoors, and whose livelihood depends heavily on the weather patterns, have devised ways to foresee the weather in order to prepare themselves.

Having the skills to read the warning signs that nature provides has short-term and long-term benefits that can greatly increase your chances of survival in a bug-out scenario. Whether a major storm is brewing and you need to prepare to build a shelter in for the day or if the likelihood of flooding doubles and you need to reconsider your location for the season, learning how to predict the weather using nature is a valuable survival skill.

Continue reading at The Bug Out Bag Guide: How To Predict The Weather In The Wilderness

what is bushcraft

By Chris Ruiz – The Bug Out Bag Guide

The old saying goes “The more skills you have the less gear you need”.  This is a great mindset to have and it provides a clear path on the journey to preparedness.  Today I am going to share with you a set of skills and tools that all add up to the overall field known as “Bushcraft”.  If you are an old hand at wilderness survival or are just asking, “What is Bushcraft?” this article will show you what skills to learn and tools to use when growing your bushcraft knowledge and survival abilities.

What Is Bushcraft?

Bushcraft is the art of using the resources provided by our natural environment to survive and thrive in the great outdoors.  It combines the knowledge of how to best use the plants and animals at your disposal with some basic bushcraft tools to make outdoor living easier and more efficient.  In learning bushcraft skills we benefit in many ways including:

  1. Increasing our ability to adapt to new challenges
  2. Becoming more self sufficient
  3. Growing our confidence
  4. Increasing our survival skills
  5. Becoming better prepared to face unforeseen problems

Bushcraft is not just one thing to learn.  It is a group of related skills that help you survive and adapt to overcome obstacles.  Although traditional bushcraft is focused on wilderness survival, its mindset of using the world around you can easily be applied to an urban or suburban setting.

bushcraft skills

Learning bushcraft survival skills will go a long way in making you better prepared the next time a disaster strikes.  Many of the skills and projects within the field of bushcraft can be directly applied to survival situations and are immensely useful to learn.

What Are Bushcraft Skills?

Bushcraft encompasses several primitive skills to shape the world around you and meet your survival needs.  In this article I am going to focus on the fundamental bushcraft skills that are most related to survival:

Continue reading at The Bug Out Bag Guide: What Is Bushcraft: Survival Skills, Tools, & How To Learn

Image source: JackMtn.com

Image source: JackMtn.com

By Kevin Danielsen Off The Grid News

I’ve known quite a few avid bushcrafters in my day, and from Eagle Scouts to lifelong trapper/hunters, they all seem to have one thing in common: While they do enjoy teaching and mentoring a newbie bushcrafter, sometimes, the newbie is unaware of the prerequisite basics before you take your wilderness game afield.

So here are five of those basics, so that your bushcraft-wise buds aren’t shaking their heads after a half-hour of your night to (attempt to) build the evening’s fire. Hey, you’re just getting started, and we all know that … but one thing in common with all survivalists is that we like to be prepared beforehand. Here’s your chance to do just that.

Hammer out these rules in your home lab, so that you can spend more time practicing the harder stuff with your group in the field lab.

Continue reading at Off The Grid News: 5 Vital Rules For The Newbie Bushcrafter

bushcraft skills

By Chris Ruiz – The Bug Out Bag Guide

Feeding yourself off the land can be a challenge even in favorable conditions and is one of the most important bushcraft skills to learn.  It takes a good knowledge of local plants and animals as well as the ability to actually catch or gather them to make a meal.  The field of bushcraft has lots of ways to make this easier.  For more basic information on getting started with Bushcraft, check out our article HERE.

Bushcraft Skills: Foraging for edible plants

Being able to forage for your dinner requires an in depth knowledge of the plants in your area.  You need to know not only what you CAN eat but also what you CAN’T eat.

bushcraft skills

What to look for

  • Roots and tubers:  Roots and tubers are found in the soil underneath the vine or stalk of a plant.  They are very nutritious but usually require cooking or boiling.  Potatoes, yams, and onions are all either roots or tubers.
  • Grasses: The young whitish tips of many grasses are edible and often palatable.  They can be eaten raw
  • Seeds & Nuts: The seeds and nuts of many plants are edible and provide a good source of nutrition.  If you taste a seed or nut and it has a bitter or acidic quality it is probably not safe to eat.  Frequently seeds and nuts can be made safe to eat by soaking them for 12 hours in water or boiling.
  • Fruit & Berries: We are used to seeing fruit in our supermarkets on a regular basis but it is important to note that the apples, pears, and bananas we consume are the product of thousands of years of cultivation by farmers.  Many berries and fruits found in the wild can be harmful if eaten.  Generally any fruit that is red in color should be avoided.  Unless you are sure a fruit or berry is safe to eat these are best avoided.
  • Leaves: The leaves of many plants are edible both raw and after boiling.  Some palatable ones to seek out are watercress and nettles (be careful when picking nettles as they can sting), both of which often grow near freshwater streams.  Beware leaves that have a strong bitter taste.

bushcraft skills

Things to avoid:

An important part of bushcraft foraging is knowing what to avoid.  Remember that there are exceptions to every rule so it is best to educate yourself about your local plants as much as possible.  Here are some general guidelines to follow.

Continue reading at The Bug Out Bag Guide: Bushcraft Skills: Foraging for food