Bermuda

All posts tagged Bermuda

By Brian Thompson – AccuWeather

As Karl strengthens late this week, it will threaten Bermuda and lead to increased surf at U.S. East Coast beaches.

Karl weakened to a depression on Wednesday morning after moving through a hostile environment.

The storm will emerge into a more favorable environment, which will likely allow for strengthening into Friday.

Continue reading at AccuWeather: Karl to Stir Dangerous Surf Along Eastern US Coast While Eyeing Bermuda

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Gonzalo has the potential to bring similar impacts to Bermuda this Friday as that of Fabian in 2003.

A hurricane of at least Category 3 strength is on track to threaten lives and property across Bermuda on Friday.

According to AccuWeather.com Hurricane Expert Dan Kottlowski, “Bermuda is at risk for hurricane-force winds for at least six hours on Friday with gusts near 195 kph [120 mph].”

Similar to Fabian, extensive damage is possible during Gonzalo’s passage with the potential for significant and lengthy power outages and major impact on travel.

“This wind will severely damage roof tops, communications towers, utility poles and cause considerable tree damage,” Kottlowski added.

In addition, a large and life-threatening storm surge could exceed 10 feet and cause a major rise in water levels over coastal areas and causeways.

Gonzalo strengthened Wednesday morning to become the first Category 4 hurricane, with winds of at least 209 kph (130 mph), in the Atlantic Basin since Ophelia in 2011.

While curving away from the Bahamas and the United States, the powerful and dangerous hurricane is following in the footsteps of Fay and targeting Bermuda.

Gonzalo will still be a major hurricane as it makes its closest approach to Bermuda on Friday. The current forecast track takes Gonzalo very close to Bermuda with the strongest part of the hurricane, the eye wall, over the islands.

The eye of Gonzalo will approach near the time of high tide late this afternoon, which will add to the affect of waves and inundation by a couple of feet.

During early September 2003, Hurricane Fabian brought sustained winds of 120 mph and a peak gust of 164 mph to Bermuda. There were four fatalities in Bermuda with damage over $100 million (U.S.).

“As one of the strongest, costliest and the only storm to cause fatalities in Bermuda since the satellite era, the name Fabian was retired [after that hurricane season],” according to the Bermuda Weather Service.

Even if Gonzalo’s center narrowly misses the island nation, its track will still put Bermuda “within the full brunt of the hurricane’s worst weather,” stated Kottlowski.

RELATED:
AccuWeather.com Hurricane Center
Bermuda Weather Center
Newfoundland, Canada, Weather Center

Residents should be completing necessary precautions before conditions rapidly deteriorate Friday.

The worst of Gonzalo will slam Bermuda during the afternoon and evening hours on Friday.

Heavy rain totaling 50 to 100 mm (2 to 4 inches) threatens to cause flash flooding, especially in low-lying and poor drainage areas.

Forecast winds can cause great damage to structures and widespread power outages. Anyone outside during the brunt of the storm would be at risk for bodily harm by flying objects, or swept away by huge waves if traveling on causeways or standing too close to shore.

As recently as last Saturday night and Sunday morning, torrential rain and damaging winds battered Bermuda as then-Tropical Storm Fay passed by. A peak wind gust to 82 mph was measured.

Weather conditions will rapidly improve across Bermuda for cleanup, rescue and recovery operations later Friday night and Saturday as Gonzalo takes aim at Newfoundland, Canada.

Rough Surf, Rip Current Risk Continues Along US Atlantic Coast

Even though Gonzalo will be steered away from the United States, the danger of rough surf and strong rip currents will be present at the East Coast beaches Friday. The risk will continue along the beaches in the Northeast on Saturday.

People should not stand on jetties or breakwaters to view the surf as occasionally a very large wave can sweep ashore with very little notice.

Small craft operators venturing offshore should be on the lookout for occasional large waves.

Gonzalo has already been blamed for the death of an elderly man who was on a boat in St. Maarten’s Simpson Bay Lagoon, according to the Associated Press.

AccuWeather Senior Meteorologist Alex Sosnowski and Meteorologist Mike Doll contributed content to this story.

More at AccuWeather: Gonzalo to Slam Bermuda on Par With Hurricane Fabian

Tropical Storm Jerry has become the 10th named storm and is spinning in the wide open central Atlantic away from land on Tuesday morning.

Tropical Depression Eleven strengthened into a minimal Tropical Storm Monday morning.

However, the current position and movement of the system will keep it well away from land.

@wxbrad tweeted: “Tropical Storm #Jerry has formed , zero threat to any land & sucking in some dust right now. http://twitpic.com/dfjkmh” More Relevant Tweets and Social Media ReactionAfter moving to the east Monday, it has now become stationary and is expected to start moving west late Tuesday.

The storm has slightly strengthened but is not expected to gain much more power as it remains around unfavorable conditions.

This NOAA satellite shows Tropical Storm Jerry over the open waters of the Atlantic on Tuesday, Oct. 1, 2013.

Steering currents for the storm are weak and will allow it to stick around in the same area for a few days. From that point, there are two scenarios that could play out.

One scenario has the storm getting swept out by a passing disturbance to the north towards the end of the week. The other scenario has the storm slowly drifting west, but eventually fizzling out due to unfavorable winds aloft.

In both cases, the storm will not be affecting any land. The only threat will be rough seas in the vicinity of the system.

RELATED: Potential Tropical Troubles in the Caribbean Early Next Week AccuWeather.com Hurricane Center Atlantic Storm to Brush New England, Aim at Canada

The rest of the central and eastern Atlantic will remain quiet through at least midweek.

AccuWeather.com meteorologists are keeping an eye on a disturbance in the Caribbean, however.

An area of thunderstorms has ignited across the central and western Caribbean Sea and environmental conditions are favorable for further development over the next few days.

More at AccuWeather – Tropical Storm Jerry Churns in the Atlantic

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A storm will gradually become more organized over the western Atlantic Ocean for the balance of this weekend, but will remain weak and stay east of the United States. While dangerous rip currents and rough surf will be a factor along the East Coast, wind and rain will target Bermuda, Nova Scotia and Newfoundland.

Effects from the storm on the U.S. will be minimal. With a weaker storm tracking farther east, the overall weather will remain dry for most areas from South Carolina to northern Maine.

A few showers showers will dampen parts of the coastal Carolinas, to perhaps as far north as the Delmarva Peninsula through early Sunday night. The same is possible over Downeast Maine Monday into Tuesday.

Gusty breezes will persist along the coast from the Outer Banks to the New Jersey through at least Monday morning. Early morning fog can be a problem away from the coast through Monday as well.

Clouds, rough seas and locally gusty showers and thunderstorms will diminish across Bermuda through early this week as the storm heads toward Nova Scotia.

Impacts to Nova Scotia to Newfoundland will be felt later Monday into Tuesday with the effects of a moderate nor’easter with rough seas and periods of windswept rain.

The most significant impact from a U.S. standpoint will be locally rough surf and offshore seas through Monday. However, because of the farther east and weaker storm track, problems related to this will be minor. Most larger, ocean-worthy vessels will have no issues negotiating the conditions. Small craft should exercise caution when venturing away from coastal waters as the storm begins its northward run offshore.

RELATED: Drier Weather for Soggy Florida AccuWeather.com Hurricane Center Weekend Storm Bring Threat of Flooding in Northwest

The prospects of this storm gaining tropical characteristics are bleak at this point.

According to Hurricane Expert Dan Kottlowski, “There is a chance the storm takes on some tropical characteristics before reaching Atlantic Canada waters, but disruptive winds and colder water farther north would limit the intensity and deter rapid strengthening of the system.”

With a zone of high pressure hanging around the interior mid-Atlantic and New England, the long nights, light winds and clear skies will favor the formation of early morning fog. Patchy fog will favor, but may not be limited to the interior river valleys. Allow extra travel time as a buffer if you will be heading out during the early morning hours.

More at AccuWeather – Atlantic Storm to Brush New England, Aim at Canada

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A storm forecast to develop over the western Atlantic Ocean this weekend is likely to remain weak and stay mainly east of the United States, but will brush New England and impact Bermuda, Nova Scotia and Newfoundland.

Effects from the storm on the U.S. will be minimal. With a weaker storm tracking farther east, the overall weather will remain dry for most areas from South Carolina to northern Maine.

There is a chance of spotty showers from the coastal areas of the Carolinas, to perhaps as far north as the Delmarva Peninsula this weekend. Rain could roll in from the east across Long Island and eastern and central New England Sunday night into Monday. The same is possible over Downeast Maine Monday into Tuesday.

Breezy conditions are likely along the Carolina coast this weekend and during Sunday and Monday farther north over Delmarva. Early morning fog can be a problem away from the coast through Monday.

The storm is forecast to bring building surf, rough seas and locally gusty showers and thunderstorms to Bermuda this weekend.

It could impact Atlantic Canada from Nova Scotia to Newfoundland later Monday into Tuesday with the effects of a moderate nor’easter with rough seas and the chance of windswept rain.

The weather could get a little nasty around Providence, R.I., and Boston for a time Monday.

The most significant impact from a U.S. standpoint will be locally rough surf and offshore seas Sunday into Monday. However, because of the farther east and weaker storm track, problems related to this will be minor. Most larger, ocean-worthy vessels will have no issues negotiating the conditions. Small craft should exercise caution when venturing away from coastal waters as the storm begins its northward run offshore.

RELATED: Drier Weather for Soggy Florida AccuWeather.com Hurricane Center Weekend Storm Bring Threat of Flooding in Northwest

It is not out of the question that the storm may attain the next name on the Atlantic list, which is Jerry.

According to Hurricane Expert Dan Kottlowski, “There is a chance the storm takes on some tropical characteristics before reaching Atlantic Canada waters, but disruptive winds and colder water farther north would limit the intensity and deter rapid strengthening of the system.”

With a zone of high pressure hanging around the interior mid-Atlantic and New England, the long nights, light winds and clear skies will favor the formation of early morning fog. Patchy fog will favor, but may not be limited to the interior river valleys. Allow extra travel time as a buffer if you will be heading out during the early morning hours. – More at AccuWeather

Your Survival Garden’s Worst Enemy: Weeds

By Cornelia Adams

With so many Americans growing vegetable gardens for the first time, I thought it apropos to write a post concerning the one culprit that has caused my husband and I to want to throw up our hands in surrender.  I am not speaking of rodents, varmints, or hungry neighbors.  This enemy is fierce.  This foe is the common weed.  An opponent like no other, one that will take over and suffocate your tomatoes while you go on vacation, one that grows faster than you can pull it from the ground.  If you dig up uncultivated ground in hopes of being self-sufficient, be prepared or this rival will defeat you before you can say “cucumber sandwich”.  Our family has fought the good fight for many years and learned from our mistakes and I want share what we have learned the hard way in hopes of saving fellow Preppers of an empty wallet and an aching back.

Before you begin…

First of all, if you do not mind spraying your food with weed killer like the guy down the road from us, you will have a weed free garden with very little effort outside of filling your sprayer up and possibly receiving a pulled wrist muscle.  He sprays religiously and his garden is beautiful.  However, he also has a putrid complexion, thin hair, and all of his pets have extra legs.  Our family chooses to go the chemical-free route and I am sure he laughs at us when he sees us bent over in our garden getting dirt under our fingernails.

Secondly, if you are willing to invest the money required to create a square-foot gardening and a weed-free wonderland, go for it.  The downsides are not only cost, but lack of air circulation, need for more watering, and if wood is used to make the raised beds it will eventually rot and have to be replaced.

Also, do not assume that you can simply go outside, lay down something to kill your grass in a lovely rectangular pattern, and commence growing delicious fruits and veggies.  We had a friend come over with a back hoe and dig up a large square where our veggies would sprout and grow and feed our family.  We were optimistic and naive and discovered that when you dig up a plot of grass that has a variety of weeds thriving in it, you will have many years of weeding ahead of you.

Here is a brief list and description of the top ten weeds you will encounter in your veggie patch and ideas on eradication.  If you are looking for a quick and easy solution other than chemical annihilation, STOP reading at this point because it will take a determination and a will to succeed that cause most people to either cover their gardens with grass seed or put in that in-ground pool they thought they always needed.

Most Unwanted Weed List

Crab Grass

Crab Grass

1. Crab Grass

This weed is fast growing and sprouts seed heads quickly in warm weather.  So quickly in fact, that if you happen to miss it you will be fighting all of its numerous offspring the following year.  Even worse is that when you think you have caught it and are in full annihilation mode and pull it from the ground, you have probably left its rooted nodes behind that are thriving a couple of feet away.  Your best defense is to pull it the second you see and not let it sprout a seed head,  mulching helps as well.

Dandelion

Dandelion

2. Dandelion

Yes, some people eat this in salads or brew tea with it, but truth be told, if you don’t control its population, you will be fighting a vigorous invader.  The best measure is to pull it out completely, being sure to remove the root as well.  Mulch is not very effective, however, but some gardeners swear by the dandelion puller.

Bermuda grass

Bermuda grass

3. Bermuda Grass

This weed is especially irritating because of its extensive root system.  We have pulled this out thinking we got the root and all, set in a pile beside the garden, let it winter over and lo and behold it was still alive and thriving the following season.  This grass sprouts from rhizomes that break off when you try to dig it out.  I had a gardener tell me that the roots can be as deep as 15 feet underground.  The only way you can keep it from slithering into your home and stealing your children is to mulch HEAVILY.  And forget putting down black landscape fabric because it will grow through it.  Solarizing helps as well, if you are dealing with a large patch that is winning.  This involves spreading clear plastic down in your hottest months and let the sun bake it.  Digging a moat around the garden is also recommended to keep it from creeping so quickly into garden beds.

Bindweed

Bindweed

4. Bindweed

Similar and a cousin to sweet potatoes this is called the “zombie plant” because it just keeps coming at you no matter what you do.  Do not let this hateful weed go to seed because its roots can go as deep as 30 feet underground.  Also, the seeds can stay viable for 50 years.  Unfortunately the best way to eradicate it is to pull it.  Do not till it or you will till the seeds into your soil, but use a fork after it rains to avoid leaving any fragments behind.

Chickweed

Chickweed

5. Chickweed

Some people eat chickweed in a tasty salad and use it for its medicinal properties.  I personally want to kill it.  It is a winter weed and it grows quickly.  If it is pulled at the wrong time the seeds will sprout new little chick-weeds everywhere.  You must pull it in the early spring. One positive aspect of chickweed is that you can feed it to your ducks and chickens, they will love it.

Ground Ivy

Ground Ivy

6. Ground Ivy

Pull it, it comes back.  Pull it, it comes back.  Pull it, it comes back.  Get the point?  This is best pulled out if you water the ground first before pulling by hand.  You must remove all the underground runners as well.  If you till it, it will sprout from root fragments and you might as well put in an in-ground pool over your garden.

CanadaThistle

Canada Thistle

Eek, this is a prickly perennial that requires wearing heavy-duty leather gloves to remove.  Some gardeners recommend cutting this down to the ground and pouring a mixture of vinegar and salt on the stem area.  You can also remove with a fork being sure to get the whole root system.  If all else fails and the weed takes over, you can use the fibers from the stems to make rope.  You will be very skinny due to lack of food, but you will have some good strong rope.

Burdock

Burdock

8. Burdock

Vinegar works well on hot days with this nasty biennial invader.  You can also take the time to dig this out of the ground, but it is much like the dandelion and it is imperative to remove the whole root system.  Mulch is useless.

Quack Grass

Quack Grass

9. Quack Grass

This perennial weed grows mainly by creeping underground rhizomes that release chemicals that poison other plants and keeps them from growing.  The runner roots must be removed, but be aware that the roots are very thin and it doesn’t take much for them to break off causing you to miss fragments that will become new “quackers”.  Again, do not till this weed, because you will spawn many more of its devil children.  Cover crops can help, such as field peas, buckwheat or crimson clover which will overcome the quack grass.  Many gardeners have reported that it is very common for it to crop up when buying composted manure or mulch so be sure you are not getting product full of quack grass.

Johnson Grass

Johnson Grass

10. Johnson Grass

This noxious weed needs to be dug out in its entirety.  It is suggested that Johnson grass needs to be allowed to sit out of your garden for several months before tossing into the compost pile.  Cover crops can be helpful in suppression.

The following is from Mother Earth News:


Organic Weed Control: What Works, What Doesn’t

In our comprehensive Worst Garden Weeds Survey, gardeners rated several mulch types and organic herbicides based on their effectiveness in controlling weeds. Out of those who’d tried each type, here’s how the methods ranked, including the percentage of respondents who found each effective.

Top-Rated Mulch Types

1. Paper or newspaper (80 percent) 2. Black plastic (76 percent) 3. Straw or hay (69 percent) 4. Shredded wood or bark (65 percent) 5. Grass clippings (63 percent) 6. Living mulch (45 percent) 7. Clear plastic (21 percent)

Top-Rated Organic Herbicides

1. Vinegar (72 percent) 2. Herbicidal soap (68 percent) 3. Neem oil (57 percent) 4. BurnOut Weed & Grass Killer (42 percent) 5. Weed Prevention Plus (29 percent) 6. Weed Pharm Organic Weed Killer (23 percent) 7. Cinnamon bark crab grass killer (17 percent)

Seize the Sun. More gardeners reported success with mulches than with herbicides. As you evaluate your mulch options, keep in mind that clear plastic — the lowest-ranking mulch type — will only work to kill weeds if it’s used in summer and pulled tightly over soil, creating a hot environment weeds can’t tolerate. This method of capturing radiant heat from the sun under clear plastic is often called solarization. To solarize a bed, water areas of bare soil, and then cover the areas with clear plastic. Dig a trench and bury the edges of the tightly pulled plastic in the trench so the heat will build up, and keep the plastic cover on the garden bed for three to six weeks.

Mulches Are Strong Medicine. Several gardeners said the most successful mulch strategy was to use newspapers and/or cardboard under a thick layer of organic mulch, such as grass clippings, shredded leaves, straw, hay or a combination of these (wet your newspapers so they don’t fly around as you try to lay them down).

The tips most often cited were to do a couple of good hand weeding sessions early in the growing season before laying down mulch, and to keep reapplying organic mulches as they decompose throughout the season. Grass clippings will block weed growth better than the same thickness of hay or straw, but will usually not last as long. Grass also releases more beneficial nitrogen than hay, straw or leaves. Start your mulching regimen early, before weeds get a foothold, and don’t be shy about applying a lot — if you can, mulch 6 to 8 inches deep with hay, straw or leaves, or 2 to 3 inches deep with grass clippings. Organic mulches are a quadruple win because they suppress weeds, build fertility, retain moisture and are often free. Simply gather grass clippings and leaves from your property, or get them from friends or neighbors who don’t use lawn herbicides.

Many respondents commented that black plastic mulch is effective because it blocks light from weeds, but it can leave a mess of fragments in your garden when it eventually deteriorates. Others noted the usefulness of landscape fabric laid beneath a layer of straw for keeping weeds out of paths.

Organic Herbicides. Almost all of the gardeners who commented on organic herbicides said the ones that work only offer a temporary fix. Many said store-bought options aren’t worth the money. Many gardeners considered vinegar an effective herbicide option if applied directly to weeds on a sunny day. If you’re cautious about protecting the soil food web in your garden, note that vinegar can do minor harm to soil microorganisms. Read more here:

In conclusion, weeds are not our friends.  They will invade every inch of your garden if you allow it.  New gardeners should plan on spending the summer months at home working in the garden upon digging their new garden.  Make it a family affair.  We have given our children sections of the garden that they have to keep weed free.  Neglecting your renewable source of food is not wise.  The reward for all your hard work is that your family will be growing food for the table and pantry and eventually, after years of waging war on weeds, you will win.  If you can practice eradicating diligently and removing weeds upon sight, you will eventually have fewer weeds invading your garden and more food in your belly. – The Prepper Journal