Baja California

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By Eric Leister – AccuWeather

Hurricane Newton will bring dangerous flooding and mudslides to parts of northern Mexico, including in popular tourist locations in Baja California, through the middle of the week.

About 14,000 tourists are in the path of Newton in Baja California Sur, Genaro Ruiz, the state tourism secretary said, according to the Associated Press.

Continue reading at AccuWeather: Hurricane Newton to Unleash Dangerous Flooding on Baja California, Northern Mexico

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By Adam Douty

On Sunday afternoon, Hurricane Odile weakened to a Category 3 hurricane while located to the south of Baja California Sur with maximum sustained winds of 201 kph (125 mph) and gusts as high as 249 kph (155 mph). The storm had strengthened to a Category 4 early Sunday morning.

Despite not making a direct landfall, Odile will pass close enough to bring life threatening conditions to Baja California Sur through Tuesday.

The southern tip of Baja California will experience the worse conditions from Odile Sunday night and into early Monday as 100-200 mm (4-8 inches) of rain floods the area. Sustained winds of 80-130 kph (50-80 mph) are expected and wind gusts approaching 160 kph (100 mph) will cause widespread power outages and structural damage.

AccuWeather.com Meteorologist Richard Jaworski warns that “Given Cabo San Lucas’s location on the southern tip of Baja California, risks will not only be confined to flooding rain and damaging wind, but a several foot storm surge will also cause significant coastal flooding.” Local residents and tourists should expect extended power outages along with loss basic services.

RELATED:
AccuWeather.com Hurricane Center
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Tropical Depression In the Gulf of Mexico

While conditions begin to improve in Cabo San Lucas on Monday, life-threatening conditions will spread northward across central and northern Baja California Sur on Monday and Tuesday. However, as the storm moves northward, impacts are expected to gradually lessen as Odile weakens over progressively cooler water.

This animated GIF shows powerful Hurricane Odile tracking toward Baja California. (NOAA/Satellite)

Heavy rainfall will not be confined to Baja California as torrential downpours will extend into western Mexico.

During the afternoon hours early this week, heavy thunderstorms will develop along the Sierra Madre Occidental Mountains. The downpours will produce a general 25 to 75 millimeters (1 to 3 inches) of rain with locally 150 millimeters (6 inches) along the western slopes of the mountains.

That amount of rain could trigger flash flooding and mudslides, especially since the region was just soaked by once-Hurricane Norbert.

Through the middle and into the end of the week as Odile continues to drift to the north, despite weakening, the door will open for its moisture to surge northward and bring flooding downpours back to the Southwest U.S.

More at AccuWeather: Hurricane Odile to Bring Life-Threatening Conditions to Baja California

Tropical Storm Norbert

Norbert’s Current Stats

Status Tropical Storm
Position 26° N, -117° W
Winds 60 mph
Gusts 70 mph
Movement WNW 8 mph
Pressure 29.36 in / 994 mb

By Eric Leister

Hurricane Norbert continues to churn and will move near the shorelines of Baja California and northwestern Mexico this weekend. Despite weakening late this weekend, regions will be faced with high surf, strong winds and flooding.

“Given the proximity to land, the storm will bring large waves and swells to the coast from Baja California of Mexico into Southern California,” AccuWeather.com Meteorologist Randy Adkins said.

Rough surf with waves of 4 to 8 feet will create dangerous beach conditions along the southwest coast of Mexico and Baja California through Sunday. Waves could reach heights of 12-15 feet at times along the southern Baja coastline.

Currently the hurricane is a category 3, with maximum sustained wind gusts of 115 mph.

Norbert will begin a gradual weakening trend late this weekend as it moves over increasingly cooler waters, tracking parallel to the Baja Peninsula.

Even though landfall is not expected over Baja California, tropical storm-force winds will still batter southern areas which could result in some power outages.

“Winds of 40-50 mph will brush the southern reaches of Baja California over the next 12-24 hours including the resort city of Cabo San Lucas, but fortunately the strongest winds associated with Norbert will remain offshore,” Adkins said. “Heavy rainfall will not be a widespread threat, though some flooding will be possible across the southern Baja.”

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Despite slowly weakening and moving farther from the coast of Baja California over the weekend, tropical moisture will be pulled across Baja California and northern Mexico, fueling widespread daily thunderstorms. These storms will be capable of producing flash flooding and also elevate the threat of mudslides.

While Norbert will briefly track farther west over the weekend, the storm could be pulled back toward northern Baja as a much weaker storm during the first half of next week. Despite being in a weakened state, moisture will continue to be pulled into the southwest United States and northern Baja California, furthering the threat of flooding.

AccuWeather Meteorologist Courtney Spamer contributed content to this story.

More at AccuWeather: Baja California Braces for Norbert Effects This Weekend

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The combination of the ongoing monsoon and moisture from Tropical Storm Ivo over the eastern Pacific will bring heavy rainfall to portions of the Southwest Sunday and Monday.

The weather pattern has the potential to bring drought-busting rain to some locations but also packs the risk of urban flooding and a flash flooding disaster.

Tropical Depression Nine formed on cue Thursday morning and is projected to drift northward near the coast of Baja California, Mexico, this weekend. From that position, the system would be able to pump a great deal of moisture northward. As forecast, T.D. Nine became Tropical Storm Ivo Friday morning.

Initially, northwestern Mexico and part of Southern California to southern Nevada, Arizona and New Mexico will be targeted with the downpours.

However, the rainfall is likely to spread northward into part of the Sierra Nevada, northern Nevada, much of Utah and the Colorado Rockies, even though the center of circulation from the storm may dissolve along the Baja California coast.

A couple of inches of rain could fall over a few hours, which is more than enough to cause dry stream beds to turn into raging rivers and overwhelm storm drains in towns and cities.

Motorists should be prepared for not only rapidly changing weather conditions but also hazards on the roads. Downpours miles away can lead to rapid flooding and mudslides.

RELATED: Southwest Regional Radar U.S. Watches & Warnings Watching for Development in the Eastern Pacific

How much, if any rain reaches areas from San Diego to Los Angeles and Sacramento is questionable. However, areas from near Palm Springs, Calif., to Las Vegas, Phoenix, Flagstaff, Ariz., and Salt Lake City are more likely be hit with torrential downpours.

The rain and higher humidity will lower the risk of wildfires for a time in the Southwest.

However, the bulk of the drenching rain is forecast to stop short of or diminish over the area where massive wildfires are burning in portions of Idaho, Oregon and northern California.

The rain is also forecast to hold up west of much of Texas and the southern High Plains.

There is a chance of a second tropical system coming northward, possibly spreading more rain over part of the Southwest U.S. and Northwest Mexico during the Labor Day Weekend.

More at AccuWeather – Flash Flood Threat in the Southwest; Phoenix, Las Vegas at Risk

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The combination of the ongoing monsoon and moisture from a developing tropical system over the eastern Pacific will bring heavy rainfall to portions of the Southwest Sunday and Monday.

The weather pattern has the potential to bring drought-busting rain to some locations but also packs the risk of flash and urban flooding.

Tropical Depression Nine formed on cue Thursday morning and is projected to drift northward near the coast of Baja California, Mexico, this weekend. From that position, the system would be able to pump a great deal of moisture northward. The next name on the list of Eastern Pacific systems for 2013 is Ivo. T.D. Nine is forecast to become a tropical storm before the end of the week.

Initially, northwestern Mexico and part of Southern California to southern Nevada, Arizona and New Mexico will be targeted with the downpours. However, the rainfall is likely to spread northward into part of the Sierra Nevada, northern Nevada, much of Utah and the Colorado Rockies, even though the center of circulation from the storm may dissolve along the Baja California coast.

A couple of inches of rain could fall over a few hours, which is more than enough to cause dry stream beds to turn into raging rivers and overwhelm storm drains in towns and cities.

Motorists should be prepared for not only rapidly changing weather conditions but also hazards on the roads. Downpours miles away can lead to rapid flooding.

RELATED: Southwest Regional Radar U.S. Watches & Warnings Watching for Development in the Eastern Pacific

How much, if any rain reaches areas from San Diego to Los Angeles and Sacramento is questionable. However, areas from Palm Springs, Calif., to Las Vegas, Phoenix, Flagstaff, Ariz., and Salt Lake City are more likely be hit with torrential downpours.

The rain and higher humidity will lower the risk of wildfires for a time in the Southwest.

However, the bulk of the drenching rain is forecast to stop short of or diminish over the area where massive wildfires are burning in portions of Idaho, Oregon and northern California.

The rain is also forecast to hold up west of much of Texas and the southern High Plains.

There is a chance of a second tropical system coming northward, possibly spreading more rain over part of the Southwest U.S. and Northwest Mexico during the Labor Day Weekend.

More at AccuWeather – Flooding Rain From Tropical Storm to Reach Phoenix, Las Vegas

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As Dalila continued to crawl away from land Friday, Tropical Storm Erick formed south of Mexico.

Currently, Erick is paralleling the coast of Mexico and is not expected to make landfall. However, the tropical storm is expected to become a hurricane by Monday afternoon.

The AccuWeather.com Hurricane Center expects this system to track northwestward through the weekend with its center of heaviest rain and strongest winds remaining offshore.

Its outer rain bands may still graze the southern Mexican coastline, accompanied by flooding downpours. That is especially true where the system will pass closest to land, likely from Acapulco to Manzanillo.

The system will also prolong the rough surf and rip current danger that was kicked up by Dalila along the south-central and southwestern coast, creating hazards to both residents and vacationers.

RELATED: Dalila’s Latest Statistics AccuWeather.com Hurricane Center Mexico Weather Center

Meanwhile, Dalila has weakened into a tropical depression, spinning about 450 miles south-southwest of the southern tip of Baja California. It will continue to spin away from mainland Mexico, eventually reaching cooler waters and weakening further over the weekend.

Rough surf and rip currents will remain a concern along the Mexican southwestern coastline, near Manzanillo, through late Thursday as Dalila’s flooding rain and damaging winds stay well offshore.

More at AccuWeather – Tropical Storm Erick Forms Near Mexico