Prepping

By Daisy Luther – The Organic Prepper

Out of all the years that I’ve been writing about prepping, this has been the year of the wake-up call. If one good thing has come from all the disasters, it’s the fact that many people have seen the light and learned a hard, firsthand lessons and want to start prepping.

  • Hurricane Harvey taught people that places which didn’t normally flood were still not exempt from Mother Nature and that the aftermath was rife with danger.
  • The wildfires in California taught people that they needed a rapid evacuation plan for themselves and their pets.
  • Hurricane Maria taught us that life could completely and utterly change for millions of people whose homes were destroyed and who may not have the grid back anytime in the near future.
  • Hurricane Irma was one of the strongest hurricanes to hit the state in many years. Millions of people were warned to evacuate. Residents faced destruction and lengthy interruptions in power and the availability of supplies.
  • Throughout all these disasters, we got confirmation that all hell DOES indeed break loose and that we won’t be able to rely on 911, no matter how stringently the “everything is okay” myth is reinforced by the media.

Now there’s an epic storm in the Northeastern US that was sudden and brutal. A friend called me yesterday and told me she and her family could be without power for more than a week. She wasn’t ready for it. “This really drove home what you do,” she said.

All of these horrible things have one silver lining…more people than ever realize that the government won’t be rushing to save them anytime soon and that they must be prepared to be completely on their own.

So if this is you, welcome to the prepped side. I have put together a little primer for you. It isn’t over the top. You don’t need a bunker and an AK47 for each family member. You just need food, water, shelter, and an evacuation plan. No tinfoil required.

There are links in each section where you can go to learn more about that topic. At the end is a resource list with some shortcuts and some useful books.  You don’t have to do every single thing RIGHT NOW.  This is just a preparedness overview and if you have recently been through an emergency, you will probably recognize what your priorities should be.

Water preparedness

If you never buy a single canned good or bag of pasta for long-term food storage, please store water. Every time there’s a pending emergency, the shelves at stores are completely cleared of water within a matter of hours (if not sooner.)

If you went out and bought it, a full month’s supply of drinking water for a family of 4 would cost approximately $150, depending on the prices in your area. I recommend the refillable 5-gallon water jugs for this. This is a small investment to make for your family’s security and well-being in the event of an emergency.

As well, fill empty containers with tap water. Every container that comes into your house can be used for these purposes. When you empty a jar or bottle, wash it, fill it up, and stash it somewhere. Even if these containers aren’t food safe, you can use them for flushing, cleaning, and hygiene.

Once you have water stored, consider adding filtration devices, secondary water sources, and water harvesting to your preparedness endeavors. You can learn more about water preparedness in my book on the topic, and  HEREHERE, and HERE.

Build a pantry

Lots of preppers like to keep a year’s supply of food on hand. If you’re just getting started out, that can bein incredibly overwhelming. Start out smaller than that – focus first on an extra two weeks, then on a month’s supply. You can always build from there.

Keep in mind when building your emergency food supply that you might not have electricity during some disasters. In that case, you’ll want to have food that doesn’t require lengthy (or any) cooking times. Look for just-add-water dehydrated foods, or better yet, foods that don’t need to be cooked at all. Search for an off-grid cooking method that will work for your home.

Do not make the mistake of loading your pantry with nutritionless processed foods. In a crisis event, you want your body to work optimally, and junk in means junk out. Focus on nutrient-dense foods for good health and energy no matter what’s going on in the world around you.

  • Learn how to build a pantry HERE.
  • Learn to build a food supply fast with emergency buckets HERE.
  • Find a list of foods that don’t require cooking HERE.
  • Shop for emergency food HERE.
  • Get an emergency stove that can be used indoors HERE.

Power outage survival

A great starting point for someone who is just getting started on a preparedness journey is prepping specifically for a two-week power outage.  If you can comfortably survive for two weeks without electricity, you will be in a far better position than most of the people in North America.

Lighting is absolutely vital, especially if there are children in the house.  Nothing is more frightening than being completely in the dark during a stressful situation. Fortunately, it’s one of the easiest things to plan for, as well as one of the least expensive.

Some lighting solutions are:

Learn about prepping for a two-week power outage in more detail HERE.

Have a plan for sanitation preparedness

A common cause of illness, and even death, during a down-grid situation is lack of sanitation.  We’ve discussed the importance of clean drinking water, but you won’t want to use your drinking water to keep things clean or to flush the toilet.

For cleaning, reduce your need to wash things.

  • Stock up on paper plates, paper towels, and disposable cups and flatware.
  • Keep some disinfecting cleaning wipes and sprays (I don’t recommend using antibacterial products on a regular basis, however, in the event of an emergency they can help to keep you healthy.)
  • Use hand sanitizer after using the bathroom and before handling food or beverages – there may be a lot more germs afoot in a disaster.

Look at your options for sanitation.  Does your toilet still flush when the electricity is out?  Many people discovered the hard way that the toilets didn’t work when the sewage backed up in the highrises in New York City in the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy.  At our cabin, the toilet won’t flush without power because the pump is electric.

If you are on a septic system, with no risk of the toilet backing up into the house, simply store some water for flushing in the bathroom.  (At the first sign of a storm, we always filled the bathtub for this purpose when we had a home on septic.)  Add the water to the tank so that you can flush.

If this is not an option, another solution is to stock up on extremely heavy duty garbage bags (like the kind that contractors use at construction sites) and kitty litter.  Place a bag either in your drained toilet or in a bucket.  Sprinkle some kitty litter in the bottom of the bag.  Each time someone uses the bathroom, add another handful of litter. Be very careful that the bag doesn’t get too heavy for you to handle it.  Tie it up very securely and store it outside until services are restored. Learn how to make a kitty litter toilet in more detail HERE.

Heat (depending on your climate)

If your power outage takes place in the winter and you live in a colder climate, heat is another necessity.  During the first 24 hours after a power outage, you can stay fairly warm if you block off one room of the house for everyone to group together in.  Keep the door closed and keep a towel or blanket folded along the bottom of the door to conserve warmth.  You can safely burn a couple of candles also, and in the enclosed space, your body heat will keep it relatively warm.  As well, dress in layers and keep everything covered – wear a hat, gloves (fingerless ones allow you to still function), and a scarf.

  • Click HERE to learn how to stay warm with less heat.
  • Click HERE for some cozy options to get your home ready for winter.

However, after about 48 hours, that’s not going to be enough in very cold weather. You will require backup heat at this point in certain climates.  If you are lucky enough to have a source of heat like a fireplace or woodstove, you’ll be just fine as long as you have a supply of wood.

Consider a portable propane heater (and propane) or an oil heater.  You have to be very careful what type of backup heat you plan on using, as many of them can cause carbon monoxide poisoning if used in a poorly ventilated area. Also, invest in a  Carbon Monoxide alarm that is not grid-dependent.

Learn more about off-grid heat options HERE.

First Aid kit

It’s important to have a basic first aid kit on hand at all times, but particularly in the event of an emergency.  Your kit should include basic wound care items like bandages, antibiotic ointments, and sprays.  As well, if you use them, keep on hand a supply of basic over-the-counter medications, like pain relief capsules, cold medicine, cough syrup, anti-nausea pills, and allergy medication.

If you want to put together a more advanced medical kit, you can find a list HERE.

Special needs

This is something that will be unique to every family. Consider the things that are needed on a daily basis in your household. It might be prescription medications, diapers, or special foods.  If you have pets, you’ll need supplies for them too.  The best way to figure out what you need is to jot things down as you use them over the course of a week or so.

Plan ahead for home defense

It’s an unfortunate fact that disaster situations bring out the worst in many people. Because of this, even if you stay safely at home, you could be called upon to defend your property or family.  Some people loot for the sheer “fun” of it, others consider chaos a free pass to commit crimes, and still others are frightened and desperate.  You can have a 10 year supply of food, water, and medicine, but if you can’t defend it, you don’t own it. The article The Anatomy of a Breakdown explains the predictable patterns of social unrest.

The best way to win a fight is to avoid getting into that fight in the first place. Secure your home and lay low, but be prepared if trouble comes to visit.

Here are some tips to make your home less of a target:

  • Keep all the doors and windows locked.  Secure sliding doors with a metal bar.  Consider installing decorative grid-work over a door with a large window so that it becomes difficult for someone to smash the glass and reach in to unlock the door.
  • Keep the curtains closed. There’s no need for people walking past to be able to see what you have or to do reconnaissance on how many people are present.
  • Don’t answer the door.  Many home invasions start with an innocent-seeming knock at the door to gain access to your house.
  • Keep pets indoors. Sometimes criminals use an animal in distress to get a homeowner to open the door for them. Sometimes people are just mean and hurt animals for “fun”.  Either way, it’s safer for your furry friends to be inside with you.

If, despite your best efforts, your property draws the attention of people with ill intent, you must be ready to defend your family and your home.  If the odds are against you, devise a way to get your family to safety.  Your property is not worth your life.

It’s very important to make a defense plan well before you need one.  This book can also help. You want to act, no react.

Have an evacuation plan

Not every emergency can be weathered at home. Sometimes there is no option but to evacuate. Some examples of this are the pending collapse of a dam, a volcano, a massive storm, flooding, wildfire, or a chemical spill. In some cases, you’ll have an hour or two to get ready before you have to leave. In other situations, there may barely be enough time to put on your shoes.

Have things set up ahead of time so your evacuation can be quick. Even if you have more time, getting on the road before everyone else gives you the advantage of being less likely to be stuck in a traffic jam while disaster bears down on you. Keep important documents in the cloud so you can access them if your home is destroyed.

Don’t wait for the evacuation order. When officials are trying to cover mismanagement or when an event occurs suddenly, you may not be warned in time.

Survival Supply Checklist

Here is a general list of supplies to have on hand. Remember that sometimes power supplies are lost during a variety of situations, so keep the potential for a down-grid situation in mind when preparing.  You don’t have to get everything all at once.  Just get started and build your supplies as you can. After a quick inventory and re-organization, you may be pleasantly surprised at how many supplies you actually have on hand.

  • Water: 1 gallon per person per day (We use 5-gallon jugs and a gravity water dispenser
  • Water filter (We have a Big Berkey)
  • Necessary prescription medications
  • well-stocked pantry – you need at least a one-month supply of food for the entire family, including pets
  • This is a one-month food supply for one person – it’s not the highest quality food in the world, but it is one way to jumpstart your food storage
  • An off-grid cooking method (We use this one for inside and this one for outside, plus our barbecue)
  • Or food that requires no cooking
  • First aid supplies: This one is good for basics and this one is good for traumatic injuries
  • Lighting in the event of a power outage
  • Sanitation supplies (in the event that the municipal water system is unusable, this would include cleaning supplies and toilet supplies)
  • A way to stay warm in harsh winter weather (This Little Buddy propane heater with a supply of propane is our choice)
  • Over-the-counter medications and/or herbal remedies to treat illnesses at home
  • A diverse survival guide and first aid manual (hard copies in case the internet and power grid are down)
  • Alternative communications devices (such as a hand crank radio) so that you can get updates about the outside world
  • Off-grid entertainment:  arts and craft supplies, puzzles, games, books, crossword or word search puzzles, needlework, journals (Find more ideas HERE and HERE)

Books to Help You on Your Journey

Welcome to the preparedness community!

I’m always so happy to welcome people who are new to preparedness.  Read books, go to websites, and join forums an Facebook groups. While there ARE some curmudgeonly folks out there, most are delighted to answer questions and help you on your way.

Please, don’t let the thought of all of the preps that you do not yet have bring you down.

It’s a process.  Once you know the possibilities, accept them, and begin to prepare, you are already far ahead of most of the neighborhood. Don’t be discouraged by how much you have left to do, instead, be encouraged by how far ahead you are compared to your former unawareness.   Just making the decision to get started is the biggest step towards preparedness you’ll ever take.

For those of you who have been doing this for a while, please welcome our new friends. And tell us in the comments, what is your best advice for getting started?

This article first appeared at The Organic Prepper: This Is Your Wake-Up Call: How to Start Prepping

About the author:

Daisy is a coffee-swigging, gun-toting, homeschooling blogger who writes about current events, preparedness, frugality, and the pursuit of liberty on her website, The Organic Prepper. She curates all the most important news links on her aggregate site, PreppersDailyNews.com She is the best-selling author of 4 books and lives in the mountains of Virginia with her two daughters and an ever-growing menarie. You can find Daisy on FacebookPinterest, and Twitter.

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By Jeremiah Johnson – Ready Nutrition

ReadyNutrition Guys and Gals, this piece is meant to stimulate thought and action toward having a place to retreat to if the time comes.  I know, everybody is going to defend their piece of land to the death when the SHTF.  How about when the SHTF in another matter…akin to our fellow citizens with Hurricane Harvey?  Stands to reason that the numbers of the displaced and homeless are starting to mount.  Whatever the “end event” may be, there always exists the possibility that you must flee.  Let’s explore some criteria and options.

By this time (long in the tooth/late in the game) you should have already formulated a plan…a “Plan B” if you wish for where to run.  If you have not, you need to consider these criteria.  Many of you (especially the naysayers, skeptics, and trolls) will “what if” these criteria to death.  Use the basics and apply them to the situation that arises.

  1. How far away is either national forest or woods to retreat into?
  2. Does the area you plan on fleeing to have a water supply, food (in the form of game or forage), isolated from groups of people, and out of the radius of the initial event (hurricane, nuclear attack, etc.)?
  3. Can you reach it? This takes into consideration your route planning…using the road, waterways, or possibly an air escape.  Traffic patterns, viable roads, and gridlock must be factored into your planning.
  4. Will you be alone or will other families be with you, and/or waiting for your arrival?

This last part is very important.  It is one thing to plan on going to a safer area, but it is quite another to have one prepared and waiting for you.  Now is the time to act on things.  Now is the time to formulate a good, solid plan of action and stick to it when the time arrives.  Do not suffer from the “paralysis of analysis,” because you can plan for years and then fail when the time comes to make a decision to act.

There are too many factors to be able to list in under ten pages single-spaced.  We’re trying to generate some ideas and also to stimulate thought toward a viable plan.  When the SHTF arrives?  Here’s a good rule of thumb to follow: Everybody will be “needy” and need what you have, and you will need the things that others have.

That house out in the country by the Everglades where your cousin lives?  Maybe a good time to see what you can contribute to it and what kind of alliance you can form.  You need to do your research and find out about uninhabited cabins in parks and recreational areas.  Do your research and find out about hotels or travel lodges that are beginning to shut down with the close of the summer.  As survivalists, you understand the physical needs of material support and safety for your families.  Now is the time to research a place to flee to if need be.

Here’s a “spark” for the mind: What if more than one thing happens?

Chances are one thing may spark other things, such as a nuclear war may trigger large fires of the likes of which we’re experiencing currently in the northwest.  You may have multiple problems to deal with, and if you have to abandon ship (your home) you want to have a place to go, already planned out if not stocked up and prepared.

Planning promotes a good follow-through.  Formulate that plan and inventory your equipment.  Don’t just plan on one location to flee to: you should have multiple locations.  You may flee your town to avoid a nuclear war, only to find you end up in an area where forest fires have been raging for months.  Game it out at every angle, and start gaming it now.  I can’t even tell you how many people e-mail me their desires to leave their home state.  I make a suggestion, and they say, “Well, we’ll have to wait and see.”  Then they give me their reasons.

When a disaster happens, the reasons for not preparing for it will not be good enough and do not provide for the bottom lines…what you and your family need to survive.  Having a place set up to run to is prudent, plain and simple.  Now is the time to put that backup retreat location in order, not after the SHTF.  In the end, when the music stops playing, you’ll want a chair to sit down in.  Keep fighting that good fight.  JJ out!

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition: Prepper Strategy: Vital Considerations When Planning a Bug-Out Location

About the author:

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

man in the wilderness in the winter

By Nick O’LawModern Survival Online

Bushcraft is the art of living in a natural environment, within and in harmony with nature. It is distinct from (though it shares a lot with) survival, where the mindset is only about getting out at the other end as safely as possible. Bushcraft will teach you skills not just to survive, but to thrive in comfort, and rely not on your gear, but yourself. This is a list of the skills you will need.

Finding and Purifying Water

Water is almost certainly the very first thing to worry about when learning bushcraft. The rule of three gives you a maximum of three days without water, which goes down to one in very hot, arid conditions. Remember that even once you have found water, in most cases it will then need at least to be filtered and possibly distilled or boiled before it is safe to drink.

Finding water is often just a matter of understanding your surroundings well, such as knowing that water flows downhill, so valleys and gullies are always a good start. Humans are only animals, and all other animals need water too, so following animal trails or watching for birds flying quickly (they fly slower after drinking, because they are heavier) are also good strategies.

There are many, many different ways to purify water, and there is not space here to do justice to all of them, but suffice it to say that filtering will remove only the larger particles, distilling will get rid of smaller stuff, and boiling will kill bacteria. Sometimes all three may be needed.

Finding Food

There are three ways to find food in the wild: foraging, hunting and trapping. Foraging is by far the easiest to learn, and is likely to produce the most reward.

Continue reading at Modern Survival Online: The Definitive Bushcraft Skills List

How Autumn Leaves Can Become 'Miracle Mulch' For Your Spring Garden

By Kristen DueverOff The Grid News

As we enjoy the changing seasons and the vibrant colors that come with autumn, we prepare ourselves for cooler temperatures and the raking and gathering of fallen leaves. For gardeners, this doesn’t mean an added chore, but actually a beneficial moment for improving and preparing our gardens for winter. There are many uses for those discarded leaves, and below are a few common ones.

  • Compost: Mow the leaves and place in the compost pile. It is easy to shred the leaves with a mower.
  • Leaf mold: This is a pile of leaves and soil that sits for about a year, and then is added to the compost. It helps with nutrients and soil-building.
  • Storing: This is a method of keeping all the leaves in a pile and using them to add to the compost when brown material is needed.
  • Mulch: Mulch retains moisture, controls temperature of soil and limits weed growth. Leaves also add nutrients and brown material as time goes on.

Let’s take a look at using autumn leaves. Mulching is one of the easiest and most beneficial methods of using autumn leaves.

Continue reading ay Off The Gris News: Autumn Leaves: ‘Miracle Mulch’ For Your Spring Garden

By Jeremiah Johnson – Ready Nutrition

ReadyNutrition Readers, Simply put, urban survival will be quite a bit different from survival in a remote wilderness area or even a sparsely-populated suburban area.  Let’s game some options, remembering that these options are general.  These actions aren’t specific to the type of breakdown of society (external by an attack from a foreign nation, or internal from economic collapse, for examples).

So, we have our collapse.  Let us “X” out a nuclear war/nuclear terrorist attack, as we can deal with all the other scenarios in variables without radiation to contend with.  Let’s identify the largest challenges faced for that high-rise apartment resident in Manhattan, or the family in the brownstone on the South side of Chicago.  First, let’s game the scenario:

After “The Day,” the city was almost completely without power.  You and your wife and two children were not able to leave town.  All mass transit was halted or discontinued.  It has been three days, and your family has been listening to static on the radio for the most part, with “campy” pre-recorded disaster broadcasts that have not been helpful or informative.  One of your neighbors left this morning after saying goodbye: he and his family had a boat, and they were heading out of the harbor, hoping to use one of the major rivers to make an escape.

They didn’t have room to take you or yours, but you wanted to stay put and not follow your neighbor’s idea: that there were plenty of boats whose owners were not going to use them…probably dead following the rioting and civil breakdown.  You’re beginning to think you should have listened to him.  Now you can hear angry voices outside, and you go to the window.  A mob has gathered at the top of your street!  They’re armed with rifles, bats, axes, machetes…and there are about 500 of them.  As you watch, they’re making a move toward the first house on the opposite side of the street.  Your house is less than half a block away.  There are no more cops, no more laws, no more order, and no help will be coming…on The Day After Doomsday.

Sounds pretty bleak, huh?  That’s because it is unless you keep a cool head about you and stay in focus.  Here are your primary tasks, and in this order:

  1. Defense: without a clear plan and the means to execute that plan, you’re going to have problems.
  2. Secure Domicile: in itself a part of the defense, as if you live in an easily-entered structure, you’re going to need to fortify it and have a security system and a guard/lookout schedule.
  3. Food and Water: always critical.  We touched on some of this in the last segment with water.  You should have at least a one-year supply for each member of your family of nonperishable food.
  4. Medical supplies and equipment: This entails the ability to perform first aid, to perform long-term supportive measures, and both short and long-term definitive care for special needs members of the family.
  5. Cohesion: your family needs to function akin to a well-oiled machine, as best it can.  Faith will be a key element: in God, in one another, and in what you are doing.  The inner discipline for each family member and for the group as a whole are key to enabling success for you and ensuring your survival.

Now let’s talk about what you’ll be facing, keeping in mind we already did not specify what type of disaster caused the end of it all.  A nuclear war will have radiation and probably foreign invaders at some point.  An asteroid impact will have traumatic weather catastrophes and cataclysmic effects all over.  What we are focusing on here is a city that is (for all intents and purposes) physically “intact” but is no longer functioning…its infrastructure is crippled, the social order is defunct, and chaos is the word for the day.  What are you facing?  Here are some of the challenges:

  1. Complete lack of food outside of your supplies: akin to a swarm of locusts, people will descend upon the grocery stores, convenience stores, dollar and discount stores, and big box stores…until the stores are no more…looting everything and anything they can grab.  Happened in New Orleans, I’m here to tell you…and it’ll happen again.  Dogs, cats, birds, and anything else that crawls, walks, flies, or runs…will be eaten.  All of this within the first week to two weeks.
  2. Cannibalism: when the disaster strikes, there will be a lot of people who will actively hunt other humans for food.  For those smiling naysayers, you may wish to read about the Donner Party, the Andes aircraft crash, and numerous other accounts of such things.  You can take it to the bank that it will happen again…and the “Drive By” also becomes the “Drive Thru.”
  3. Disease: it is a well-known fact that dead bodies, poor sanitary conditions, and lack of clean running water and working sewers will all contribute to diseases.  Typhus, E. coli, and plague will all return…diseases that are not a threat will quickly become out of control after the SHTF.
  4. Bad Guys:  Lots and lots of bad guys (and gals, not to leave you out of the loop!) doing really bad things and trying to do more bad…to you and yours.  We’re going to do a piece just on this, so I’m not going to burn out all my fire at once.  Suffice to say there will be gangs and small packs of “opportunistic entrepreneurs” out roaming the streets of your town…and they’re not looking to sell you on “Amway.”  They’ll take what they can…including your life.

So, what to do?  Well, here’s the first step to defeating all these factors:

Have a plan, and work that plan until it takes effect, and get out of town!

You’ll need to train, game out the scenarios, and work on your preps if you must hunker down.  The best thing to do is get out of the city or town.  In a high-rise apartment building, you’re going to be very limited in what you can take out of there effectively if the vehicles are not working and the electricity is out.  It’s hard to carry hundreds of pounds of gear and supplies down a dark staircase fifty stories and then escape a city in ruins or turmoil.  The odds are against it.  The key is to have a place…a safe place with supplies that you can reach…and when the time is right, get out of that city.

It will be important to form teams, within your own family, and potentially including others who live near you of a like mind.  Here’s a rule to follow:

No “free rides,” any allies outside of the family must have their own supplies and be self-sustaining to be a legitimate ally.

You must trust them implicitly: A real trust, not the BS handshaking of men and the hugging of women once a week at a card party or barbeque.  No, a real trust based on knowing them well, and for as long a time as possible.  You don’t want to undertake an endeavor, and then end up at the rendezvous point, and having them kill you and take your supplies.  Gasp!  Ohh!  Perish the thought, right?

Wrong: Know that human nature means in a disaster a “switch” can be flipped at any time and those you thought were your allies are now attackers.

You’re going to have to get together with your family and the other family or two who are on your “team” and figure a way to exfiltrate out of the city with as many supplies as you can carry.  Most of the gangs will be looking for easy pickings, therefore if you present a unified defensive posture…everyone knowing their functions and carrying their weapons and moving as a unit…this will dissuade them.  Wolves usually prey on the young, the weak, the old, and the sick first.  Men are no different.  They would prefer a bunch of fatsos sitting around in their living room with their supplies than a group of families that has their “S” together and can defend themselves.

This is not to give you false bravado.  There are skills you need, happy family, to be able to make it through.  I hope one of your family members is a veteran.  If not, seek one out and pick up some training.

“Thank you for your service,” is the BS line that everyone uses on you when they haven’t served…it makes them feel good when they say it to you…as if they have checked the “patriotic block” on a form.

You’ll really thank a vet if you’re trained by one.  How about this for an idea?  If there’s not one in your family or on your “team,” then find one…and pay the veteran to train you.  I can see the frowns now.  Nobody likes to open that wallet.  I guess you’ll have to weigh what is more valuable to you and determine where your priorities lie.

Thank the veteran with more than lip service in this instance, and learn valuable skills that you could have picked up if you had served.  You will need some combat skills, such as how to work as a fire team, how to clear a room, and communication between members, be that vocally or with hand-and-arm signals.  In the end, it will be up to you, and you will only receive in proportion to what you extend of yourself.

You’ll need to practice and drill getting out of your locale.  You’ll also be wise to equip your team (your family and another family working with you) with Motorola’s and stick them in Faraday cages until it’s time to move out.  There is still time to game and implement this thing; however, the more quickly you move on it the smoother you can make it for yourself and others.  The time to be prepared is yesterday, and the disaster can come tomorrow.  Let us know your thoughts and any suggestions you have, and stay in that good fight!  JJ out!

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition: Fact: Your Chances of Surviving a Post-Collapse Urban Environment are Slim

About the author:

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

A Fully Off-Grid Home For $4,500

By Tricia Drevets – Off The Grid News

If you have been wondering about living a self-sufficient lifestyle in a tiny house, you may want to check out a new video tour of such a home in Eastern North Carolina.

Jeremy Clemons designed and built his cozy $4,500, 160-square-foot home himself, and it is an evolving work in progress. He is working on the door for his stall shower, and he says he is on his fifth revision of the home’s interior set-up, including the placement of his queen bed in the tiny house. Right now, the bed is set up several feet in the air, allowing plenty of room for storage underneath.

Jeremy grows much of his own food in a garden outside his home. He gets power from solar panels and from three marine batteries. A large woodstove dominates the home, and he admits it puts out more heat than he needs. Jeremy says that the foam board insulation in his walls helps the home retain heat and that his inside temperature is often 20 degrees above the outside temperature in the winter without use of the woodstove.

This article first appeared at Off The Grid News: A Fully Off-Grid Home For $4,500

[Editor’s Note: Have you noticed how deadly outbreaks have been occurring more frequently? Remember the Ebola scare? Or the avian flu epidemic? While many of these spread in third world countries, they are escalating in severity. Mother Nature may be telling us something.

Presently, the pneumonic plague or as many of us know as The Black Death has resurfaced and it’s airborne. Thus far, 684 plague cases and 57 deaths have occurred from an airborne transmission of the plague in Madagascar and Seychelles. One fact is certain, this outbreak is spreading at an alarming rate and many in the affected area are scrambling for face masks, supplies and most importantly, antibiotics.

Only time will tell if this outbreak moves to other parts of the world, but it is important to keep a vigilant eye on this health crisis and know how to protect yourself to mitigate the effects.]

By Jeremiah Johnson – Ready Nutrition

There has been an outbreak of plague, the pneumonic form that can be transmitted directly through airborne transmission, involving direct contact with someone who has been infected.  Although this is taking place far away on the islands of Madagascar and Seychelles off the coast of East Africa, the Ebola outbreak a few years ago showed that such outbreaks cannot always be completely confined.

Dave Hodges released an excellent piece recently, entitled Something Very Big and Very Evil is About to Happen that is worth reading, especially concerning the special warehouse facilities where government medicine and supplies are being stockpiled throughout the nation.  Another very relevant article is entitled “An alarming development as the Bubonic Plague is now confirmed in the Seychelles while hundreds of new cases suspected in Madagascar“.  The reason this plague is so bad is that it is readily transmissible, it is a pneumonic plague (which is more severe), and fatalities are occurring within 24 hours.

How to Protect Yourself Against the Pneumonic Plague

I researched a WHO site that lists pharmacological treatments for the plague.  The resource is 79 pages in length, authored by two medical doctors.  It comes directly from a WHO (World Health Organization) plague manual from Chapter 3 entitled “Treatment of Plague.”  I am going to list the top three plague medications from the article here:

1.Streptomycin is the number one drug for the treatment of Yersinia pestis (the plague bacteria) and specifically effective against pneumonic plague.  The dosage is 30 mg per kg (of patient body weight…conversion being 1 kilogram = 2.2 pounds).  Up to 2 grams per day can be administered in divided doses, injected intramuscularly for a course lasting 10 days or until 3 days after the body temperature of the patient has returned to normal.

2. Chloramphenicol: can also be used to treat plague, with a dosage of 50 mg/kg/day in divided dosages. The dose is given parenterally (by IV) or orally, for a period of 10 days.

3. Tetracycline is an antibiotic that is bacteriostatic. This means that bacteria does not grow/spread with its administration.  This antibiotic can be used in treatments of plague.  Loading (initial) dose of 15 mg/kg is given, not to exceed 1 g total.  Subsequent dosages are 25-50 mg/kg/day, with no more than 2 g per day given, for a total of 10 days.  It can be given as an adjunct to other antibiotics.  Caution in that expired Tetracycline cannot be used past the expiration date, because it is hepatotoxic (poisonous to the liver).  It also causes photosensitivity (makes one sensitive to sunlight).

Preparing for Outbreaks by Using Multipurpose Drugs

The website, www.rightdiagnosis.com  lists Ciprofloxacin as a drug to use against pneumonic plague post exposure.  Ciprofloxacin prevents the plague bacteria’s DNA from being able to replicate.  In short, it stifles reproduction of the bacteria, and it is a broad-spectrum antibiotic.  The FDA authorized it as a preventative medication and as a treatment.  Dosage (a website for drugs at www.drugs.com ) lists it 500 to 750 mg orally every 12 hours for 14 days.

In case you haven’t been following the news, the drug listed above, Ciprofloxacin is also a drug that can treat against Anthrax.  Yeah, one of the bio-weapons that North Korea is believed to have stockpiled…with the capability to deliver to the United States via a missile.

In addition, the shelf-life to the last med is at least 10 years, and it doesn’t need refrigeration.  It is also available as an aquarium med from veterinary pet suppliers without a happy prescription from your smiling, happy, perfect doctor.  So now Mr. and Mrs. Hallmark and family can stock up on something that may help if the pneumonic plague crosses borders and the ocean, as well as picking up something that may be used to treat for anthrax initiated by a war.

Preparation and survival must take into consideration the nature of the disaster that strikes for an apocalyptic/SHTF scenario, but you must also consider what is going on prior to the event… because chances are high that it won’t stop going on!  Outbreaks that are contained will become epidemics when a collapse happens or a nuclear war.  You want to well-round your supply stores with what is needed before you need it.  Be smart, and update your supplies periodically, so that you’re never without a current and working supply of meds.  More information will be published on this outbreak in the near future where we will cover more on the plague and go over some herbal remedies that may help in case you can’t acquire the meds listed here.  JJ out!

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition: Health Alert: Fatal Airborne Transmission of Pneumonic Plague Spreading at Alarming Rate. These Lifesaving Antibiotics are Your Best Defense

About the author:

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.