Water

Survivopedia water tank

By Chris Black – SurvivoPedia

Preparedness comes in many shapes and forms, but water storage is one of the main problems to be taken care of in any survival scenario. Storing food for long term is not a big problem anymore, since freeze dried foods became affordable for the masses, but water storage is another discussion.

We can’t live without water, or at least we can’t live without it for more than three days anyway. Regardless of your situation, whether you’re an urban prepper or you’re already living off-grid somewhere in the countryside, storing water in a big tank on your property as a backup system would be a great idea.

I am talking about building a water tank and hooking it to a rain water collector; now you can see why DIY-ing your own water container would be a good thing for long term survival, because rain is a given regardless of your geographical location.

Continue reading at SurvivoPedia: How Many Ways Can You Build A Water Container?

Advertisements

water-300x225

By Joshua Krause – Ready Nutrition

You’ve probably seen it countless movies and TV shows. Some poor guy is stranded out in the desert, and is in desperate need of water. So he cuts into a cactus, and harvests an abundance of lifesaving H2O. In the real world however, most cacti don’t really provide much water. The fluid they do provide is far from potable. In all likelihood it will induce vomiting and delirium rather than quench your thirst.

But that doesn’t mean you can’t gather water from other plants. In fact, there are several tree species you can tap for fresh drinking water, in much the same way you would tap a cactus (if you had a death wish). While everyone knows that you can tap maple trees for their syrup, birch and walnut trees can also be tapped. They will produce a fluid that has a much lower sugar content than maple, though all three are good sources of hydration in case you’re ever stranded in the wilderness. Here’s how it’s done:

Or if you’d rather make a less intrusive mark in the tree, you can use this slightly different technique.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition: How to Harvest Clean Drinking Water From a Tree

About the author:

Joshua Krause was born and raised in the Bay Area. He is a writer and researcher focused on principles of self-sufficiency and liberty at Ready Nutrition. You can follow Joshua’s work at our Facebook page or on his personal Twitter.

Joshua’s website is Strange Danger

 

 

shtf-water-plan

By Ken Jorgustin – Modern Survival Blog

Here’s the thing about water that most of us already know, but many ignore… ‘you can’t live long without it’. In fact, water will rapidly become a NUMBER ONE concern following most any major disaster.

As I’ve said before, I believe that many or most people who are actively involved in preparedness, often overlook the importance of water by making the assumption that water is and will always be easy enough to obtain. This assumption is based on the readily available supply that most of us take for granted, and the fact that we often ‘see’ water in our natural surroundings as we travel here and there.

There are several issues to consider though:

Continue reading at Modern Survival Blog: Do You Have A SHTF Water Plan?

purify water 1Jeremiah Johnson – Ready Nutrition

This is Part II of a pair of articles on finding and obtaining water in the field.  The last one we covered some methods of chemical purification, and stressed (as we stress here): boiling is the safest method to purify your water.  Keep in mind something I didn’t mention in the previous article: water that is contaminated by pollutants such as toxic chemicals and industrial wastes is not able to be purified by chemicals or boiling to make it safe for drinking.  We will address that in a minute.

How to Distill Water

We covered some basics, and along with that is how to find surface water that is relatively uncontaminated.  This is where the boiling came in, to remove the pathogens (as many as possible) safely.  Now, what do you do when you come across a water source that has a chemical sheen and an odor about it?  You can remove the water by condensation.  If you can’t filter it through a Brita or other system that removes chemical contaminants, take a small pot, and (preferably) a glass lid that is larger than the opening of the pot.  You’ll need a third vessel.  This is for “pour off,” of your condensed water.

Straining off as much as you can (with a piece of cloth, and perhaps an empty plastic bottle, pour some water into the smaller pot.  Then bring it to a boil, and set the glass lid over it, and tilt it at an angle to one side (45 degrees is fine).  The bottom tilted edge of the lid needs to be able to “empty” into a clean vessel.  When you boil the water, the steam that condenses on the bottom of the lid is water: you can collect this and use this to drink, effectively removing enough contaminants to make the condensed water potable.

You’ll have to improvise to either hang the lid at an angle with some weight on one edge to make the tilt possible, or build a stand.  Just make sure the lid doesn’t touch the top edge of the pot with the water to be condensed.  Don’t boil it all the way down!  Leave about an inch of water or so to enable you to get rid of the newly-concentrated chemical “slurry” now remaining in the pot.

Solar Still

solar still

Next, a solar still.  There are plenty of diagrams available for this one.  Dig a hole, conically-shaped about 2-3’ in depth, and line around that hole, covering it with clear plastic, a 9’ square sheet is best.  You then place a collecting receptacle underneath the center of the plastic.  Line the edges of the sheet with stones, and place a small stone in the center of the plastic sheet.  It is best to cut green, non-poisonous vegetation and line your hole with it before you cover it with the plastic sheet.  The collecting vessel should be at least a quart, because in this method, you will obtain 1 quart of water per day on a sunny day.  Simple math tells you if you need at least a gallon a day, then you need a minimum of 4 stills to make it work.  You can also run a siphon tube to your collecting vessel in order to siphon or drink your water without removing/dismantling the still.

That plastic sheeting can also be immediately pulled up and turned into a funnel for other vessels to fill with drinking water should it rain.  This stuff is all pretty easy to cram into a backpack, and it doesn’t have much weight.  You can pick up “drop cloths” of plastic in the dollar store…4 of them…and place them in a protective bag or canister to keep them from being torn.  Stock up on a bunch, as they’re micro-thin; other plastic can be obtained, however, this is lighter and easier to tote.

Hidden Water Sources

Let’s go into real grid-down situations.  You have (may God forbid) had to flee your home, and it’s a “Road Warrior” environment.  Along the way you may come across abandoned houses or buildings.  Water, think water.  Where man has dwelt, water is near.  This is a rule of thumb for you.  Time to spec out the following to see if you can locate water:

  1. Washing Machines: sometimes they have a reservoir that will enable you to drain out some water if you tilt the machine to the rear. Check the outflow portion.  You’ll have to filter it, condense it, and then (to be on the safe side…it washed out the socks that stepped in Fido’s doggie-do) boil it again.
  2. Refrigerators: especially those with the ice-machine and the cold water dispenser in the door. You can find the copper inflow pipe, and the fridge usually has a drain for ice melt down below.  Tap into these and tilt if necessary.  Filter and condense, then boil.
  3. Hot Water Heater: a “gold mine,” as most of them hold at least 45 to 50 gallons. Same thing…tap into it…there’s an outflow…and then filter and boil, to be on the safe side.
  4. Chest-type freezer: this you’ll have to be more careful, as if any food went bad, you’ll have to take the ice melt and filter, purify (chemically), and then boil.
  5. Toilet: the top tank is the goal. Can you take from the bowl?  Do the three-prong: condense, boil, and treat chemically, and you can in a survival situation.  Same for the top tank, as you don’t want any pathogens in your water.
  6. Radiator (heater for house): will oftentimes have a small supply of water.  Purify by condensing.
  7. Iron (for clothes): yes, Mom may have left a little in the reservoir for you to take; boil it or chemically purify it.
  8. “Green Thumb” house: yes, in that greenhouse or garden shed may be a little water you can cannibalize from water cans; condense it (there may be weed killer lingering in the pitcher), and boil it (if they compost or fertilize with manure).
  9. Birdbath/bird feeders/animal bowls: once again, it may be there for the taking. Remember: these must be boiled!  Too much of a chance for pathogens.
  10. Cisterns/wells/water tanks: remember, if you can store water, so can the people who might have had to dee dee mau (exfil the AO) lickety-split.  Never neglect the potential for the other guy to leave something behind.

If you’re more in the forest than an urban/suburban area, watch the wildlife if you haven’t found a surface water source, especially deer.  Look for deer paths and game trails.  Most of the time they will cross a running water source.  Watch the skies frequently for waterfowl, such as ducks or geese.  They need the water.  On the advent of nightfall, open your ears for the sounds of frogs…they need to be in the water to breathe.  If you hear Bobby the Bullfrog, water is definitely near.

All of these basics print out and go over them in your mind until you remember them and are familiar with them.  Remember, we covered 10 items for a house.  The more houses and buildings you find, the better your chances of finding a water supply.  Just remember, it may be someone else’s water supply, too.  Such is the chance you take on the Day after Doomsday.  Be smart, be adaptive, and as the Irish saying runs, “The top o’the mornin’ to ye, and the bottom o’me glass!”  Water glass, in this case.  Keep fighting that good fight!  JJ out.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition: How to Find and Purify Water Sources You Never Considered

 About the author:

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

 

 

catchment

By Jeremiah JohnsonReady Nutrition

Hey, hey, hey, ReadyNutrition Guys and Gals!  No, Fat Albert is not in front of the keyboard!  Just JJ here with an article geared toward gearing up for a potential drought year.  Coleridge’s “Rime of the Ancient Mariner” referred to the omnipresence of water regarding the seas and oceans.  Fresh water is a different matter; therefore, here are a few pointers that you can follow to help secure your family’s supply in both time of paucity and for when the SHTF.

Water Storage Solutions for Every Type of Emergency

1. Soda Bottles

There are ways to prepare for and store water for short-term emergencies. Of course, one of the determining factors being your geographic location, as well as the other one of how your home is situated – if you have a lot of ground or live in an apartment – are variables that will affect your family’s water plans.  I highly recommend starting off small, and working your way up.  Two liter soda bottles are excellent water storage vessels, and well within the budget.  Here are some other popular choices for storing water for emergencies. Also, don’t forget about emergency water sources hidden in your home. Read more about them here.

To remove the sugar and any remaining acidic fluid, make sure you fill them halfway with hot or boiled water and shake them out really well. These actions will remove the sugar and enable your water to not have a medium that could help to grow bacteria.  Remember, check to make sure your bottle has a code number such as 1,2,5,7, or HDPE on the bottom to ensure plastics do not leach into your water.  The bottles are made to hold soda (a caustic, acidic fluid) for a long period of time and will work equally well in protecting your water.

 

water2. 5-gallon containers

For disasters water sources to be questionable for a week or longer, consider investing in some 5-gallon containers. Water bricks are a great example of this type of water storage solution.There are myriads of five-gallon water canisters available, so we will just mention that whatever type you decide to go with, standardize it and make it the norm, to help you keep track of the water.  Store your water on the bottom of your storage space, so that if the container is compromised you will not experience everything under it being soaked.

Also, keep your soda bottle-containers “boxed,” in groups of 6 or twelve to help prevent them from falling or rolling all over the place.  Once again, plastic bins are best to accomplish this task. Here are plans for creating a holding rack for 5-gallon water bottles.

 

catchment3. Catchment systems

Rainwater catchment systems are an excellent choice for those of you preparing a long living disaster. You can refer back to previous articles on water-catchment systems I wrote with diagrams on how to utilize rainwater to build up a supply right out of your downspout to fill in 55-gallon food-grade plastic drums.  Another consideration is a good cistern.

There is a great article in Howtopedia, a free downloadable resource (and printable) with all kinds of plans and designs for different projects.  The articles come with step-by-step instructions on how to accomplish the tasks at hand.

 

Cistern4. Cisterns

Cisterns are the ultimate long-term water storage source and have the capacity to hold up to 20,000 gallons of water or more (depending on the size, of course). For a cistern, you will need some ground and you might want to rent a “C” (as we called them in the Service) or a small backhoe to go nice and deep.  Cisterns can be above ground or below. For the latter, you want it at least 6” below the frost line (the top of the hatch), and you can also channel your downspout into it.

There are several layers of sand, gravel, and charcoal that you can place at the top of your cistern that will allow for filtration of rainwater into it through the downspout and into the ground.  One thing that will help immensely is an access hole that can be “plugged” through which you can insert the tube for a hand pump/hand-crank water pump to pull water out, as you need it.  The cistern is good because it’s out of sight and allows for passive collection of water.

Here is a great example how to purify drinking water from a cistern if you find yourself in an off grid situation.

19th_century_knowledge_water_cistern_and_filter

Storing water during winter months

For the wintertime, if you have a root cellar you can also store water there.  Winter water collection is not as difficult as you may think.  A woodstove adds to the benefits of utilizing snow and ice, providing a steady supply of hot water from a five-gallon soup pot.  Keep in mind that water will need to be purified before drinking. On a side note, the evaporating water will act as a humidifier and keep the woodstove from drying out all of the air in the house.

I have a question to ask of you guys and gals.  Over the winter, I saw a woodstove photo that had copper tubing wrapped around the stovepipe (before it exited the cabin, naturally).  This tubing was attached as an inlet and an outlet to heat up water and recirculate it into another container…a passive hot water heater.  The tubing had an outflow (from the water container that sat upon the stove) and an inflow (to transfer the hot water to a storage unit).  Anyone who knows of information on this system (links, plans, etc.), I would greatly appreciate your sharing it with us.

To summarize, now is the time to take these measures to store and collect water for your family.  There is plenty of time now to inculcate a working system and build up sizeable storage sections for your home, wherever you live, that is within your budget.  It is best to have at least a 10-14 day supply for every member of your family, going at a rate of 1 gallon per day minimum per family memberDon’t forget the pets on this, and also take into consideration any family member – pet or human – that may have special needs of increased water.  Have a great day, and happy water collecting!  JJ out!

About the author:

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

 

 

SolarStillforPreppers

By Blake Alma – The Prepper Journal

In this day and age, we have plumbing and faucets. We have our own water bills and water heaters. We also have our own water pipelines which connects with the cities or counties pipeline. We drink our water from our faucets. We may have water filters so that we may stay away from unwanted bacteria and particles. But what happens if an earthquake or a natural disaster occurs and it destroys the pipelines? You have no more water!!!

Well that is a problem considering the fact that we humans can only live 3 days without water! How then can you get water when your water’s pipeline is destroyed? You may begin to worry, for that is okay. However, let me put your fears behind you, for you can survive! Sure it may not be easy or even fun, but even the most urban human being can collect water without a pipeline. Nevertheless, if you have a fresh body of water nearby, you’re probably going to be okay! You just need to boil all water that you collect from the wild. Now, if you have several plastic water bottles you may survive a little longer. But all your supplies may run out! So why not be a prepper and prepare your home with the prepper’s solar still kit.

Continue reading at The Prepper Journal: The Prepper’s Solar Still

ways-to-store-water-at-home-for-emergency

By Ken Jorgustin – Modern Survival Blog

When disaster strikes, begin storing water IMMEDIATELY! Lack of clean water will ravage you and your family much quicker and more critically than any shortage of food.

If you do not have clean water for drinking, cleaning, food preparation, and for bathroom-sanitary purposes, crippling sickness could tear through your family — especially without the hope of prompt medical attention.

You MUST have enough water…

Continue reading at Modern Survival Blog: Ways To Quickly Store Water At Home During Disaster