Shelter

Pixabay.com

Pixabay.com

By The Survival Place Blog

Whatever you think about the recent results of the US election, it’s not an exaggeration to say we’re living in strange times. A lot has changed around the world in the last few months and years. Who knows what might happen from here? And, there’s always the threat of natural disasters, which never truly go away. It’s always a good idea to have a survival shelter in case the worst was to happen, so let’s take a look at how to build one.

Shovel

For any survival kit, the shovel is an important necessity. A shovel can be used for all sorts of reasons with a shelter, from building a makeshift bed to solving drainage problems. You’ll need to be sure that you get a high-quality shovel if you’re planning to build a good shelter. You can find these across the web if necessary.

Power Drill

A power drill is an important tool for any circumstance, let alone building a survival shelter! You’ll need this to reinforce the shelter and carry out all manner of DIY tasks related to it. There are a lot of different drills on the market, and you might need to seek more helpful tips about which ones you’ll need for certain tasks. Be sure to have the right type of drill to hand when you’re building your shelter.

Tarpaulin

This might not be a tool to actually build your shelter with, but it’s an important necessity for the shelter itself. To be honest, a tarpaulin presents you with a readymade shelter from the off. It can be used for all sorts of other things, including providing ground insulation. Or, as a basic need to stay warm, it can be used to wrap around yourself inside the shelter during cold moments. A necessity, for sure.

Hatchet

You never just know what you might need a hatchet for. In a particularly troublesome scenario, it could be used as a self-defense mechanism. More likely, you’re going to use a hatchet to chop wood and hack tough materials. Ultimately, the hatchet is a great tool for the survival build because of its many uses. It’s also something you can carry around with ease, unlike some other tools which might need plugging into the mains.

Knife

Has a survival shelter ever been built without the use of a knife? Whatever type of knife you use for the task, you’re bound to get a lot of use out of it. In a similar fashion to the hatchet, the knife can be useful for a wide variety of tasks. Close-up work both inside and outside the shelter will be easy to tackle with the convenience of a knife. It’s also worth equipping yourself with a pocket knife for any nights you spend inside the shelter later on. You never just know when it might come in handy.

We hate to suggest that anything bad might be on the horizon, but it’s always worth having a shelter just in case. It’s also quite a fun task to get involved with, especially if you’re a fan of DIY! There’s no time like the present to get started.

This article first appeared at The Survival Place Blog; 5 Tools You Need To Build The Perfect Survival Shelter

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The Cheapest Way To Build A Sturdy, Reliable Bug-Out Retreat

Image source: Pixabay.com

By Rich M Off The Grid News

Probably the biggest problem associated with bugging out is having a place to go. A few survivalists or preppers have a cabin in the woods or a bunker buried somewhere, but most of us don’t, simply because we can’t afford it.

Please note that I don’t consider just bugging out to the wild a viable alternative. Few people have the necessary skills to play Grizzly Adams and live off the land. And trying to do that, with what you can carry in your bug-out bag, is a recipe for disaster. You just can’t carry the tools you need to be able to build a cabin and cultivate crops in the wild. Nobody can.

What if I were to tell you that you can build that bug-out retreat and you can do it relatively cheap? Now, let me define “cheap” here. I’m talking about building something for a few thousand dollars, maybe as much as $5,000, but definitely less than $10,000. Compared to what a cabin in the woods costs, that’s cheap.

There are two basic things you need in order to create a bug-out retreat: land and a shelter. With that as a starting point, you can work on putting together the rest. So, let’s start with those.

Continue reading at Off The Grid News: The Cheapest Way To Build A Sturdy, Reliable Bug-Out Retreat

Getting Out of Dodge Survival Retreat | Backdoor Survival

By Gaye levy – Backdoor Survival

There comes a time when every prepper takes a look at what they have done, what they are currently doing, and what they plan to do in the future.  Sometimes, they retrench and rethink past preps and improve on what they have done and especially what they have learned skill-wise.  Sometimes they take a break because let’s face it, we all need balance in our lives.  And then there is the most difficult part which is planning for future preps, if any.

I am very good about asking questions about prepping goals and readers excel at answering.  Today I want to turn the tables and share a major preparedness goal that looms on my personal horizon.  This is not so much that I expect you to follow suit, but more that it is such a huge goal that you may find the inspiration to set long term goals yourself.

Continue reading at Backdoor Survival: Getting Out of Dodge: The Survival Retreat

About the author:

Gaye Levy started Backdoor Survival so that she could share her angst and concern about our deteriorating economy and its impact on ordinary, middle-class folks. She also wanted to become a prepper of the highest order and to share her knowledge as she learned it along the way. On Backdoor Survival you will find survival and preparedness tools and tips for creating a self-reliant lifestyle through thoughtful prepping and optimism.

To read more from Gaye, visit her website, Backdoor Survival. You can also follow Gaye on Facebook, Twitter, Google+ and Pinterest or purchase her eBook, The Prepper’s Guide to Food Storage on Amazon.com.

SurvivalHomesteadSitePlan

By  – The Prepper Journal

A great deal can go into site planning for your survival homestead, even when the infrastructure is already in place and funds don’t exist to renovate lines or move buildings. Where we place things can increase or decrease our defensive abilities, success in growing, and how likely we are to see something – which can be good or bad. It can also hugely impact the efficiency of a site, whether it’s a small suburban or urban lot or a large rural retreat. While more space creates more options, planning for efficiency has major merits for any size site. When things are more efficient, they require less work to maintain. Whether that work is manual or powered, using less time, labor and resources frees up our abilities elsewhere, allowing us to do more.

Site Planning Factors for your survival homestead

The three most important factors in site planning for efficiency are arguably access, sun, and water. They are equally important, although when aspects like defense and drought resilience come into play one or another may take more precedence. There are variable levels of importance within factors as well. For example, access for ease and convenience might drop to the bottom of a list, but access for maintenance should stay near the top.

Continue reading at The Prepper Journal: Site Planning for Your Survival Homestead

homestead protection

By Jeremiah Johnson – ReadyNutrition

ReadyNutrition Guys and Gals, this article deals with preparation on a different slant: something you may be able to do in your home state to protect you from “Big Daddy” the Federal Government.  Remember, preparation is not only for ELE’s (Extinction Level Events) or an apocalyptic cataclysm.  I would venture to put forth that when one loses their home, this is an apocalyptic event in itself.  One of the things that you may be able to use to prevent this “capture” of your home by the Federal and State government is a Homestead Declaration, and I encourage all of you to pursue this simple avenue if it is available, as I have here in Montana.

The Homestead Declaration is a homeowner’s sworn statement that claims their property as their “homestead” and that claim is recorded with the clerk of the county courthouse.  This state law enables the property owner to ‘set apart’ their property (the homestead) and ‘designate’ it as such I the interests of protecting their home from a forced sale, thereby protecting its owner equity and denying such a sale to pay off creditors.

Sounds simple? Actually, it is.  This is how I did it in Montana for my property.  I went to a place that specializes in legal forms, and purchased my “Homestead Declaration” form for $9.00.  Then I filled it out in the County Courthouse.  The clerks helped me with it, as it is required to identify the property both by address and by the plat number they have in the courthouse.  You need to bring ID with you and any other persons who are on the actual deed to the property, as the document is notarized.  The fee to file here is $16.00 and it is done.

Here I was able to go directly across the hall, pay the fee, and obtain for 50 cents a copy of the document and a filing number.  The original is then filed, later registered, and in about a week or two they send you the original in the mail with the county seal on it.  There it is!  A done deal!

Let me tell you what this document does and how it protects you.  As mentioned, it is a Constitutionally-protected law, as the states that do this enact it on their own…a power reserved to the states.  In the grand scheme of things: to a certain assessed dollar value, they are not allowed to take your home.  For us here in Montana, that amount is $250,000, and rest assured, my home is much less than that figure.  Now let’s discuss what this does for you, and how it relates to the big picture, specifically Obamacare and Medicare.

The feds and states are almost completely “in-sync” with Obamacare.  What the feds can’t grab the states can scoop up, and vice-versa.  In Montana, if you do not have health insurance, the state government automatically enrolls you in Medicare.  The bills that rack up you will have to pay back, rest assured, for medical treatments under such.  They can grab your assets and gobble up your bank account, garnishing your wages along the way.

                                           But they can’t touch your home.

Same for the feds, because it is under the Constitutionally-protected laws of the state.

JJ’s advice: If you live in a state that permits this, fill out that Homestead Document ASAP.

 The Homestead Declaration is not to be confused with a Homestead Exemption.  This is completely different, and deals with exemption from property taxes and income and such.  Here is a list of states that offer you the chance to fill out a Homestead Declaration:
“Homestead rights don’t exist under common law, but they have been enacted in at least 27 states: Alabama, Arizona, Arkansas, California, Florida, Georgia, Idaho, Illinois, Kansas, Louisiana, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, Montana, North Carolina, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, Oregon, South Dakota, Texas, Vermont, Washington, West Virginia, Wisconsin, and Wyoming. If you own, and live on, property in any of these states, you should definitely take the time to file this important document.”

Source: http://www.homesteadus.com/faq.htm

There you have it, Readers.  Remember, prepping is not just for a natural disaster or a global thermonuclear war.  You must also take care of business in the context of the present time, and this means protecting your assets, finances, and property in a standard, legal context.

JJ’s advice: While we live in a functioning (although dysfunctional) society, you must use all of the tools – business, legal, and social – that you can use to protect you and yours.

Plain and simple, the Homestead Declaration is a way that can help you safeguard your assets and maintain your home while the society is as it is.  Check and see if you are in one of the listed states and do the research to follow the requirements as I listed them for what I did here, in Montana.  States vary, but the procedure is basically the same, with fees varying and maybe some small changes in procedure or residence requirements.  Use this tool if you can, and if you are considering buying property for a retreat, consider one of the aforementioned states that satisfies your survivability requirements.  Should you commit, fill out the Homestead Declaration form, and protect your home: not just when the SHTF, but before, as well.  Keep up that good fight and tell us about your experiences.  We’d love to hear from you.  JJ out!

 

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition: Protect Your Property with a Homestead Declaration

About the author:

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

 

 

shelter

By  – SurvivoPedia

Do you remember when people were stuck in the Superdome during Hurricane Katrina?

Aside from problems with waste disposal, there were also many people that developed severe psychological problems because too many people were packed in together.

This is one very good example of what shelter means for your survival, right? But this is not enough: clothing and bedding meet the most personal needs for shelter from the climate, so we have to take them into account as well while prepping.

Continue reading at SurvivoPedia: Quick Guide For A Comfortable Shelter

By Jeremiah JohnsonReady Nutrition

The weather is warming up, and as such, there will be an increase in the need to stay hydrated in your outdoor adventures.  But what if your adventure is “upped” a notch, and a full-blown societal collapse occurs?  Drastic times call for exceptional measures.  Your water supply is a factor that must be accounted for at all times.  There are also times when you’ll have to fly by the seat of your pants to maintain your need for a clean water supply.  The issue is addressed in this article for when you’re out and about, not locked up in your prepper fortress with the door buttressed and the shutters closed.

Water is a Top Preparedness Priority

In normal activity (times of low stress) the average person needs about a gallon of water a day.  There will be times in an emergency situation when you must rely on sources other than pristine bottles of spring water or the storage cistern you have built in your backyard.  Although these products come highly recommend, I’m not going to focus on the Big Berkey, or the Lifestraw, or the myriad of other devices available commercially.  I’m going to stick to some basics that you can use anytime, anywhere.

The Most Simple and Least Expensive Ways to Purify Water

First off, let’s talk about boiling water.  It may seem that the basics of boiling water has been covered, but it cannot be overemphasized.  When you come upon that “virgin stream” out in the woods, understand: that virginity may not exist.  A host of different pathogens come into play from many different sources.  Some of these are as simplistic as animals urinating in the water upstream of your collection point.  Also, many streams pick up sedentary water from pools or inlets that have algae and bacteria growing in them; this water is then transported to your location.

Bring your drinking water to a rolling boil for 15 to 20 minutes before consumption.  At altitudes above one mile or 2,000 meters, you should increase the rolling time to three minutes. I have advocated in the past the 1-quart Army green plastic canteen system, simply because the canteen is extremely durable, and its pouch houses a steel canteen cup.  This canteen cup is a lifesaver, simply because you can accomplish your boiling of water in it and transfer it to the canteen when finished.  Augment the canteen system with alcohol prep pads to swab and cleanse the mouth and cap of the canteen.

Another point is turbidity of the water, and this is defined as what makes the water cloudier or darker and prevents light from penetrating through the water completely.  It also holds the factor of particulate matter, that is small particles of dirt, debris, or sediment that can make your drinking experience very uncomfortable.  A method to decrease turbidity is filtration, accomplished by cloths or handkerchiefs.  I prefer the latter because you can clean them and see how clean they actually are by the whiteness of the cloth.

Boiling is the way to go, and you can use it in combination with chemical disinfection.  Chlorine bleach (minus additives) can go a long way.  16 drops of chlorine bleach per gallon, and (therefore) 4 drops per quart of water.  This is one of the reasons the Army canteen is useful, as you have a full quart, and it is easy to disinfect according to this ratio.  The water purification tablets that are issued by the service are useful, even though the water doesn’t taste great.  For any of these (including commercial tablets…follow the manufacturer’s instructions), allow the cap on your canteen/quart drinking bottle to remain loose.  Sometimes detritus rises to the surface.  Just slough this off, and let it sit for 15 to 20 minutes.  THIS IS NOT A SUBSTITUTE FOR BOILING!

The reason for this is that many water-borne diseases like giardia and cryptosporidium tend to encyst and can survive a chemical disinfection, especially with chlorine.  Most of your one-celled creepy-crawlies will bite the big one with it, but boiling is the only surefire method when you don’t have an advanced water filtration system available.  Calcium hypochlorite (HTH, also known as “pool shock”) is another method to use.  The concentrations are different per the manufacturer, but you can reconstitute it and make a slurry with a one-liter bottle and a teaspoon of the HTH.  Then you follow the ratio for chlorine drops as provided above, keeping aware that it will deteriorate over time.

The HTH is useful because it is dry, and you can reconstitute it when you wish.  Be advised that it is hygroscopic, which means that it readily absorbs water unless it is sealed off properly.  Also, it can “off-gas” chlorine vapors, and chlorine gas is deadly when it proliferates in a closed space.  Be advised that you should seal up your supply of HTH in good, sealable buckets or containers that are airtight.  This will prevent off-gassing from occurring outward, as well as preventing any moisture from coming in and ruining your supply.

So boiling is the preferred method.  Another thing worth mentioning are your meds to counteract any illness you may receive from improperly or ineffectively treated water.  Metronidazole (Flagyl), usually available in 500 mg capsules is the medication of choice to fight Giardia (Giardia lamblia).  Be advised: you cannot take it with any kind of alcohol…to include cough syrups, as well as beverages.  You’ll be very violently ill.  You can pack in some HTH with you, or some bleach in a sturdy brown bottle with dropper.  The smaller the bottle the more manageable it is.  See your doctor for a prescription and consult with him prior to taking any actions regarding such meds.

In our next installment of this series we will examine water sources for you, and some unconventional areas to procure water that you may not know about.  Please make sure you boil it all.  It’s better to accomplish the boil and wait for it to cool down than to take the chance with illness.  Water is very important, but just as important as quenching your thirst is to do it with water that you know to be safe and potable.  Keep fighting the good fight!

JJ

About the author:

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.