Tsunami

All posts tagged Tsunami

Nuclear Explosion - Public Domain

By Michael Snyder – The Economic Collapse Blog

While the eyes of the world are on ISIS, Russia is creating weapons unlike anything the world has ever seen before.  Plans for a giant self-propelled nuclear torpedo that can create a giant tsunami more than 1,000 feet tall were recently “leaked by mistake” by the Russian media.  Apparently the warheads on these torpedos are designed to create so much radiation “that everything living will be killed” – including those that try to survive the attack by hiding in underground shelters.  These “robotic mini-submarines” would have a range of up to 10,000 kilometers and would be able to evade all existing U.S. detection systems.  To say that such a weapon would be a “game changer” would be a massive understatement.

I know that you are not just going to take my word for any of this.  So like I do in all of my articles, I am going to carefully document what I am saying.

The reason why we know about the plans for this new nuclear torpedo is because they were displayed on Russian state television for a few moments during a recent broadcast.  According to Russian officials, this was an “accident”.  The following comes from a report in the Independent

Secret plans for a new Russian nuclear torpedo system have been shown on state-controlled television in what the Kremlin said was an accident.

A close-up of a confidential document detailing “Ocean Multipurpose System: Status-6” was broadcast for several seconds by Channel One Russia and NTV during coverage of a meeting between Vladimir Putin and military officials.

Could it be possible that this “accident” happened on purpose?

Could it be possible that it was intended as a warning for the Obama administration?

You never know.

But without a doubt, this is the kind of weapon that would keep military planners up at night.  According to RT, this new nuclear torpedo is designed to create “extensive zones of radioactive contamination” that would ensure that no “military, economic, business or other activity” would occur in that area for a very long time…

The presentation slide titled “Ocean Multipurpose System: Status-6” showed some drawings of a new nuclear submarine weapons system. It is apparently designed to bypass NATO radars and any existing missile defense systems, while also causing heavy damage to “important economic facilities” along the enemy’s coastal regions.

The footnote to the slide stated that Status-6 is intended to cause “assured unacceptable damage” to an adversary force. Its detonation “in the area of the enemy coast” would result in “extensive zones of radioactive contamination” that would ensure that the region would not be used for “military, economic, business or other activity” for a “long time.”

In addition, Konstantin Sivkov of the Russian Geopolitical Academy told the BBC that this kind of weapon could be used to create a tsunami more than 1,000 feet high…

A warhead of up to 100 megatons could produce a tsunami up to 500m (1,650ft) high, wiping out all living things 1,500km (930 miles) deep inside US territory

As I have written about previously, a whopping 39 percent of all Americans live in counties that directly border a shoreline.  The detonation of just a handful of these weapons could wipe out the entire east coast and kill off a very substantial percentage of the U.S. population.

On top of all that, the BBC is reporting that a state-run Russian publication is suggesting that these new torpedos are being fitted with extremely radioactive cobalt warheads…

Continue reading at The Economic Collapse Blog: Russia’s New ‘Nuclear Torpedo’ Can Create Giant Tsunamis And Wipe Out Entire Coastal Cities

About the author:

Michael T. Snyder is a graduate of the University of Florida law school and he worked as an attorney in the heart of Washington D.C. for a number of years.

Today, Michael is best known for his work as the publisher of The Economic Collapse Blog and The American Dream

Read his new book The Beginning of the End

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By Michael Snyder – End of The American Dream

Could you imagine what would happen if a tsunami hundreds of feet high slammed into the east coast of the United States at several hundred miles an hour?  Just because it has never happened during any of our lifetimes does not mean that it can’t happen.  In fact, scientists tell us that there is a very good chance that it will happen someday.  And if it does happen, there is a very good chance that the number of dead Americans could be in the millions.  Even though there are “Tsunami Hazard Zone” signs on Florida beaches to remind us of this potential threat, we have built giant cities right along the edge of the water all along the Atlantic coast.  Today, an astounding 39 percent of all Americans live in counties that directly border a shoreline.  The potential damage that a major east coast tsunami could do would be unimaginable.  Remember, those living along the Indian Ocean never expected a tsunami in 2004, and those living in Japan never imagined what would hit them in 2011.  These things do happen, and it might very well happen to us one day.

If you do not think that this is within the realm of possibility, just consider what the Washington Post has had to say on the matter…

However, while there is no indication it could happen soon (but could), there are scientifically sound reasons for concern that at some point a mega-tsunami could engulf the entire East Coast with a wave almost 200 feet high sweeping everything and everybody up to 20 miles inland. The consequences of such a relatively unlikely but very possible event in loss of life and property are inestimable and beyond the realm of imagination (at least for me).

Yes, there has not been a major tsunami event along the perimeter of the Atlantic Ocean during any of our lifetimes.

But it has happened.

The most famous Atlantic Ocean tsunami during recorded history happened in 1755

The most widely known Atlantic Ocean tsunami struck Lisbon, Portugal on November 1, 1755 . It was caused by a magnitude 8.6 earthquake beneath the floor of the Atlantic about 100 miles offshore. This earthquake and associated tsunami destroyed most of the city of Lisbon. Waves up to 12 meters high hit the coastlines of Spain and Portugal just minutes after this earthquake. Over nine hours later waves with seven meter runup heights arrived in the Caribbean and caused significant damage. The earthquake and tsunami killed between 60,000 and 100,000 people.

And National Geographic says that there have been 37 verified tsunamis in the Caribbean since 1498.

So these things do happen from time to time.

But why should we be concerned now?

What could possibly cause a mega-tsunami to slam into the east coast today?

Well, according to the Washington Post, there are a couple of scenarios that scientists are focused on…

The first is a submarine landslide at the edge of the continental shelf off the coasts of Virginia and North Carolina where unstable sections of the shelf could collapse into the trenches of the deep ocean. Should that occur scientists believe an 18-foot-high tsunami would propagate towards the coast and strike in a matter of hours.

The second time bomb is a mega-tsunami caused by a massive landslide as a large section of La Palma, one of the Canary Islands in the Eastern Atlantic, collapses into the ocean following a volcanic eruption of the Cumbre Vieja volcano on La Palma. If (when) this occurs, modeling results indicate a wall of water up to 300 feet high would race across the Atlantic and reach the East Coast in about nine hours with devastating effects.

If a 300 foot tall tsunami did “race across the Atlantic” and slam into the United States, the devastation would be beyond anything that any of us have ever seen before.

The following excerpt from an article posted on Modern Survival Blog gives you a little bit of an idea how incredibly vulnerable we are…

Regardless of the factors, I felt that you may be curious to see following elevation graphics that I layered together which increment 75 feet all the way to 300 feet in height along the U.S. East Coast. I would guesstimate that if you live within 20 miles of the coast, you may be vulnerable to a Canary Island ‘event’. Fortunately, these don’t happen very often…

Several observations regarding a 300 foot tsunami would be the probable devastation of the following major East Coast cities…

Portland, ME (~ 50′)
Boston, MA (~ 30′)
New Haven, CT (~ 50′)
Bridgeport, CT (~ 40′)
New York City, NY (~ 20′)
Jersey City, NJ (~ 30′)
Newark, NJ (~ 50′)
Atlantic City, NJ (~ 10′)
Wilmington, DE (~ 80′)
Philadelphia, PA (~ 40′)
Virginia Beach, VA (~ 10′)
Wilmington, NC (~ 20′)
Myrtle Beach, SC (~ 20′)
Charleston, SC (~ 10′)
Savannah, GA (~ 10′)
Daytona Beach, FL (less than 10′)
West Palm Beach, FL (less than 10′)
Fort Lauderdale, FL (less than 10′)
Miami, FL (less than 10′)

There are countless cities in between these coastal cities. The Eastern Seaboard of the United States includes some of the largest metropolitan areas in the country. Over one third of the country (more than 100 million people) live along the East Coast. Evacuation would be virtually impossible for most (except for the astute who act quickly) due to only hours notice, probable doubt, and the subsequent immediate gridlock that would follow.

And since nearly the entire state of Florida is close to (or below) sea level, there would be next to nothing to stop it from sweeping across the entire state.  The following is an excerpt from an article about how incredibly flat Florida is…

South Florida has two big problems. The first is its remarkably flat topography. Half the area that surrounds Miami is less than five feet above sea level. Its highest natural elevation, a limestone ridge that runs from Palm Beach to just south of the city, averages a scant 12 feet. With just three feet of sea-level rise, more than a third of southern Florida will vanish; at six feet, more than half will be gone; if the seas rise 12 feet, South Florida will be little more than an isolated archipelago surrounded by abandoned buildings and crumbling overpasses. And the waters won’t just come in from the east – because the region is so flat, rising seas will come in nearly as fast from the west too, through the Everglades.

Even worse, South Florida sits above a vast and porous limestone plateau. “Imagine Swiss cheese, and you’ll have a pretty good idea what the rock under southern Florida looks like,” says Glenn Landers, a senior engineer at the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. This means water moves around easily – it seeps into yards at high tide, bubbles up on golf courses, flows through underground caverns, corrodes building foundations from below. “Conventional sea walls and barriers are not effective here,” says Robert Daoust, an ecologist at ARCADIS, a Dutch firm that specializes in engineering solutions to rising seas.

Personally, I am not that concerned about a potential Canary Island event creating a giant tsunami.

I am much, much more concerned about what would happen if a giant meteor were to hit the Atlantic Ocean.

According to the University of California at Santa Cruz website, if a giant meteor did slam into the Atlantic Ocean, it could potentially produce a gigantic tsunami with a wall of water as high as 400 feet…

If an asteroid crashes into the Earth, it is likely to splash down somewhere in the oceans that cover 70 percent of the planet’s surface. Huge tsunami waves, spreading out from the impact site like the ripples from a rock tossed into a pond, would inundate heavily populated coastal areas. A computer simulation of an asteroid impact tsunami developed by scientists at the University of California, Santa Cruz, shows waves as high as 400 feet sweeping onto the Atlantic Coast of the United States.

Could you imagine?

Today, about 10,000 major near earth objects have been discovered by scientists, and approximately 10 percent of them are one kilometer or larger in size.

At some point in the future, it is inevitable that one of them is going to hit us.

And if one does splash down in the Atlantic, the resulting tsunami could potentially kill millions upon millions of Americans.

Nobody talks about this much.  And it is almost too horrifying to think about the death and destruction that such an event would cause.

But it will happen one day.  Let’s just hope that you are out of the way when it does.

This article first appeared at End of The American Dream: East Coast Tsunami: If It Happens, MILLIONS Of Americans Could Die

About the author:

Michael T. Snyder is a graduate of the University of Florida law school and he worked as an attorney in the heart of Washington D.C. for a number of years.

Today, Michael is best known for his work as the publisher of The Economic Collapse Blog and The American Dream

Read his new book The Beginning of the End

 

How Far Inland Will a 300 Foot Tsunami Go on the East Coast

By Ken Jorgustin

Back in 2011, I wrote an article titled “300 Foot Tsunami And East Coast Destruction” regarding the possibility that a catastrophic volcanic eruption and subsequent marine (and/or submarine) landslide of one of the Canary Islands collapsing into the ocean in the Eastern Atlantic could lead to a mega-tsunami that travels across the Atlantic and devastates the East Coast of the United States. Whether it is El Hierro or La Palma that slides into the ocean, there are many opinions of the probable outcomes of such a scenario, and there are many who believe that the result could be a mega tsunami that reaches heights up to 300 feet by the time it rolls up the shoreline of the East Coast United States.

So here’s the question… “IF” a 300 foot tsunami reached the East Coast, how far inland would it go?

The short answer, and one that many may think to be accurate, is that it will go inland until the elevation of the land is higher than the tsunami. While that sounds logical, there are variables…

Actually, the distance a tsunami will travel inland has more to do with the energy it still has left as it hits the shore.

A tsunami will speed across the ocean at hundreds of miles an hour but at a relatively small height (because the ocean is DEEP). Its speed decreases as it approaches the shoreline (because the ground beneath it is getting shallower) but its energy begins to transfer to its monstrous HEIGHT. When the speed of the wave approaches zero, the wave breaks, much of its energy is released and it will not go too much further. A tsunami that reaches a height of 300 feet when it rears up at the shore, will lose energy as it travels inland.

It’s all about energy. Frequency (depending on the source of the tsunami?) and Amplitude (shape of ocean floor, shoreline and up-slope factors). It is conceivable that some tsunamis will rear up quickly (and very high) once they reach the shore (depending on the shape of the ocean floor leading to the shore), and then ‘break’ and lose much of its energy in a relatively short distance, while another tsunami may be more compressed (in frequency) and be thrust forward very quickly while traveling a long distance inland (remember Japan?).

There are scientifically sound reasons for concern that at some point a mega-tsunami could engulf the entire East Coast with a wave almost 300 feet high sweeping everything and everybody up to 20 miles inland. The consequences of such a relatively unlikely (but very possible) event in loss of life and property are beyond the realm of imagination.

Out of curiosity and an interest in maps, I have custom built the following elevation maps based on high resolution data from USGS digital elevation maps of the United States, particularly the East Coast. I have modeled several layers of elevation of the East Coast to illustrate various height scenarios of tsunami versus geography as it travels inland.

Having said that, there are many variables and factors as to how far a tsunami would travel inland, so just because a section of coastal geography doesn’t reach the height of 300 feet for say, 50 miles, doesn’t mean that the tsunami will have enough energy to travel fifty miles. There are some instances where such a tsunami would probably only travel several miles while there are other scenarios where it may roar up a river way or bay and devastate far inland (e.g. 30 miles up Delaware Bay to Dover, another 30 to Wilmington and then 20 more to Philadelphia as it builds enormous height up the waterway).

Regardless of the factors, I felt that you may be curious to see following elevation graphics that I layered together which increment 75 feet all the way to 300 feet in height along the U.S. East Coast. I would guesstimate that if you live within 20 miles of the coast, you may be vulnerable to a Canary Island ‘event’. Fortunately, these don’t happen very often…

Several observations regarding a 300 foot tsunami would be the probable devastation of the following major East Coast cities…

Portland, ME (~ 50′)
Boston, MA (~ 30′)
New Haven, CT (~ 50′)
Bridgeport, CT (~ 40′)
New York City, NY (~ 20′)
Jersey City, NJ (~ 30′)
Newark, NJ (~ 50′)
Atlantic City, NJ (~ 10′)
Wilmington, DE (~ 80′)
Philadelphia, PA (~ 40′)
Virginia Beach, VA (~ 10′)
Wilmington, NC (~ 20′)
Myrtle Beach, SC (~ 20′)
Charleston, SC (~ 10′)
Savannah, GA (~ 10′)
Daytona Beach, FL (less than 10′)
West Palm Beach, FL (less than 10′)
Fort Lauderdale, FL (less than 10′)
Miami, FL (less than 10′)

There are countless cities in between these coastal cities. The Eastern Seaboard of the United States includes some of the largest metropolitan areas in the country. Over one third of the country (more than 100 million people) live along the East Coast. Evacuation would be virtually impossible for most (except for the astute who act quickly) due to only hours notice, probable doubt, and the subsequent immediate gridlock that would follow.

The maps below simply show elevation… not the expected distance a 300 foot tsunami would travel.

 
Maine, New Hampshire, Massachusetts, Connecticut, New York Coastal Elevation Map
300 Foot Tsunami Northeast Coast United States Map

 
Chesapeake Bay & North Carolina Coastal Elevation Map
300 Foot Tsunami Chesapeake Bay and North Carolina Coast Map

 
North and South Carolina Coastal Elevation Map
300 Foot Tsunami North and South Carolina Coast Map

 
Georgia Coastal Elevation Map
300 Foot Tsunami Georgia Coast Map

 
Florida Coastal Elevation Map
300 Foot Tsunami Florida Coast Map

 
As is obvious, Florida in particular would be wiped out for many many miles inland from its coast. – Modern Survival Blog

earthquake35

Provinces and regions of the Philippines

Preliminary Earthquake Report
Notice! This is a computer-generated report – this event has not reviewed by a seismologist!

EDIS Number: EQ-20131015-360876-PHL Common Alerting Protocol
Magnitude: 7.2
Mercalli scale: 9
Date-Time [UTC]: 15 October, 2013 at 00:12:35 UTC
Local Date/Time: Tuesday, October 15, 2013 at 00:12 at night at epicenter
Coordinate: 9° 53.400, 124° 12.600
Depth: 30   km (18.64 miles)
Hypocentrum: Shallow depth
Class: Major
Region: Pacific Ocean – West
Country: Philippines
Location: 5.67 km (3.52 miles) SE  of Buenavista, Central Visayas, Philippines
Source: EMSC
Generated Tsunami: Not or no data!
Damage: Not or no data
The potential impact of the earthquake
Well-built buildings suffer considerable damage. Houses that are not bolted down move off their foundations. Some underground pipes are broken. The ground cracks. Reservoirs suffer serious damage.

RSOE EDIS – Preliminary Earthquake Report in Buenavista, Central Visayas, Philippines.

Preliminary Earthquake Report
Notice! This is a computer-generated report – this event has not reviewed by a seismologist!

EDIS Number: EQ-20130817-346660-NZL Common Alerting Protocol
Magnitude: 5.1
Mercalli scale: 5
Date-Time [UTC]: 17 August, 2013 at 08:58:40 UTC
Local Date/Time: Saturday, August 17, 2013 at 08:58 in the moorning at epicenter
Coordinate: 41° 46.710, 174° 4.932
Depth: 18.50 km (11.50 miles)
Hypocentrum: Shallow depth
Class: Moderate
Region: Pacific Ocean
Country: New Zealand
Location: 12.45 km (7.74 miles) W  of Seddon, Marlborough, New Zealand
Source: USGS
Generated Tsunami: Not or no data!
Damage: Not or no data
The potential impact of the earthquake
Almost everyone feels movement. Sleeping people are awakened. Doors swing open or close. Dishes are broken. Pictures on the wall move. Small objects move or are turned over. Trees might shake. Liquids might spill out of open containers.

RSOE EDIS – Preliminary Earthquake Report in Seddon, Marlborough, New Zealand.

Preliminary Earthquake Report
Notice! This is a computer-generated report – this event has not reviewed by a seismologist!

EDIS Number: EQ-20130812-345462-JPN Common Alerting Protocol
Magnitude: 6.6
Mercalli scale: 8
Date-Time [UTC]: 12 August, 2013 at 04:23:25 UTC
Local Date/Time: Monday, August 12, 2013 at 04:23 at night at epicenter
Coordinate: 30° 3.600, 157° 19.200
Depth: 33   km (20.51 miles)
Hypocentrum: Shallow depth
Class: Strong
Region: Asia
Country: Japan
Location: 1,513 km (0.62 miles) –  of Hutami, Japan
Source: EMSC
Generated Tsunami: Not or no data!
Damage: Not or no data
The potential impact of the earthquake
Drivers have trouble steering. Houses that are not bolted down might shift on their foundations. Tall structures such as towers and chimneys might twist and fall. Well-built buildings suffer slight damage. Poorly built structures suffer severe damage. Tree branches break. Hillsides might crack if the ground is wet. Water levels in wells might change.

RSOE EDIS – Preliminary Earthquake Report in Hutami, Japan.

Preliminary Earthquake Report
Notice! This is a computer-generated report – this event has not reviewed by a seismologist!

EDIS Number: EQ-20130810-345051-USA Common Alerting Protocol
Magnitude: 4.5
Mercalli scale: 4
Date-Time [UTC]: 10 August, 2013 at 05:10:16 UTC
Local Date/Time: Saturday, August 10, 2013 at 05:10 at night at epicenter
Coordinate: 43° 43.800, 128° 1.200
Depth: 10   km (6.21 miles)
Hypocentrum: Shallow depth
Class: Light
Region: North-America
Country: United States
Location: 299.8 km (186.29 miles) S  of Bandon, Oregon, United States
Source: EMSC
Generated Tsunami: Not or no data!
Damage: Not or no data
The potential impact of the earthquake
Most people indoors feel movement. Hanging objects swing. Dishes, windows, and doors rattle. The earthquake feels like a heavy truck hitting the walls. A few people outdoors may feel movement. Parked cars rock.

RSOE EDIS – Preliminary Earthquake Report in Bandon, Oregon, United States.