Tropical cyclone

All posts tagged Tropical cyclone

This satellite loop of Soudelor is courtesy of NOAA.

By  – AccuWeather

Soudelor remains a powerful typhoon as it barrels toward Taiwan with destructive winds and life-threatening flooding rain. Eastern China will then become Soudelor’s final target.

While no longer a super typhoon, Soudelor is still a very dangerous typhoon with its strength equal to that of a Category 3 hurricane in the eastern Pacific or Atlantic oceans.

AccuWeather Meteorologist Anthony Sagliani expects Soudelor to maintain that intensity until landfall in Hualien County, Taiwan, early Saturday morning local time (Friday afternoon EDT).

Sagliani expects east-central Taiwan, including the Hualien City, to face the most destructive winds with sustained winds over 160 kph (100 mph).

“Significant flooding is likely across many areas of Taiwan with a high threat for landslides in the higher terrain,” Sagliani continued. Most of the lower elevations will see rainfall amounts exceed 200 mm (8 inches) with the mountains being inundated with 500 to 760 mm (20 to 30 inches) or more.

Continued coverage at AccuWeather: Typhoon Soudelor Bears Down on Taiwan; China Next Target

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By Eric Leister – AccuWeather

Soudelor rapidly intensified on Monday, becoming a super typhoon and reaching the equivalent of a Category 5 hurricane in the Atlantic or Eastern Pacific basins. Soudelor reached peak intensity late Monday with winds near 290 kph (180 mph) making it the strongest tropical cyclone anywhere on the planet this year.

Even though Soudelor has weakened, it will remain a powerful tropical cyclone as it crosses the West Pacific, eventually threatening Taiwan and eastern China later this week.

The center of Soudelor passed directly over the island of Saipan to the north of Guam with Category 2 hurricane-force winds on Sunday night.

Winds to near 170 kph (105 mph) were reported on Saipan as the eyewall of Soudelor passed over the island. Guam to the south was largely spared any damaging winds as gusts reached 50-65 kph (30-40 mph) for several hours.

More continued coverage at AccuWeather: Typhoon Soudelor Eyes Taiwan With Damaging Winds, Flooding Rain; China Next in Line

By Eric Leister

Tropical Cyclone Ita is making landfall just north of Cooktown, Australia, Friday night, local time. The Queensland coast from Cape Flattery to Cairns lies in the direct path of Ita.

The latest satellite imagery indicates that slight weakening occurred prior to landfall. However, Ita will remain a dangerous, powerful storm for the next 12-24 hours as it moves just inland from the coast.

Cooktown has reported more than 65 mm (2.56 in) through Friday evening, local time as Ita continues to approach from the north.

Image of Ita as it begins to make landfall in Queensland, just north of Cooktown, on Friday. Image courtesy of NOAA

Ita is making landfall with the equivalent strength of a Category 4 hurricane. Australia, which uses a different intensity scale than the U.S., indicates Ita was a Category 5 cyclone, the highest level before weakening to a Category 4 cyclone prior to landfall.

Devastating impacts are likely. Peak winds near the center of the cyclone at the time of landfall are expected to range from 200 to 225 kph (120 to 140 mph), leading to down trees and power lines with the potential for widespread structural damage.

A text book stadium effect is present in the Thursday afternoon satellite picture, courtesy of NOAA

Ita is making landfall north of Cairns, an area with a lower population than areas farther south. This region is known for mining and national parks.

Although Ita will weaken as it approaches Cairns, due to land interaction, flooding rainfall and hurricane-force winds are expected. Conditions began to deteriorate around Cairns on Friday with the worst of the storm expected Friday night into Saturday.

RELATED:
Australia Weather Center
Flood Threat Remains for Philippines From Peipah
World’s Heaviest 48-Hour Rainfall Confirmed as More Than 98 Inches

Ita will then continue to the southeast near or just off the coast of Queensland over the weekend, spreading heavy rainfall into Townsville and Mackay. Wind gusts over 50 mph will accompany the storm as it moves farther southeast and away from Cairns.

Rainfall will also be a major concern as 75-150 mm (3-6 in) will be common within 100 km of the coastline from north of Cooktown southward to Mackay. Local amounts over 250 mm (10 in) will be possible across the region, especially from Cairns northward.

By Monday the cyclone will be in a much weakened state as it moves farther southeast off the coast of Queensland with no further widespread damaging winds or flooding rainfall expected over land.

More at AccuWeather: Dangerous Cyclone Ita Makes Landfall in Queensland

By Eric Leister

Over the past few days, Tropical Cyclone Ita has continued to strengthen as it moved westward through the Coral Sea, reaching the equivalent of a hurricane.

Ita has the potential to strengthen further in the next 24 hours as it begins to turn toward the southwest then to the south as it approaches the Queensland coastline. Ita has the potential contain winds similar to that of a Category 4 hurricane as it approaches the coastline of northern Queensland on Friday.

The expected track will take the cyclone toward the Queensland coastline north of Cairns, an area with a lower population than areas farther south. This region is known for mining and national parks.

The above satellite image shows Tropical Cyclone Ita on Thursday, courtesy of UW-CIMSS.

Peak winds at the time of landfall are expected to range from 200 to 225 kph (120 to 140 mph), leading to down trees and power lines with the potential for widespread structural damage.

As Ita approaches the coastline of Queensland, a turn toward the south will occur taking the storm toward Cairns but also causing the storm to begin weakening due to interaction with land.

Although Ita will be weakening as it approaches Cairns, flooding rainfall and hurricane-force winds are expected. Conditions will begin to deteriorate around Cairns on Friday with the worst of the storm expected Friday night into Saturday.

RELATED:
Australia Weather Center
Flood Threat Remains for Philippines From Peipah
World’s Heaviest 48-Hour Rainfall Confirmed as More Than 98 Inches

Ita will then continue to the southeast near or just off the coast of Queensland over the weekend spreading heavy rainfall into Townsville and Mackay. Wind gusts over 50 mph will accompany the storm as it moves farther southeast and away from Cairns.

Rainfall will also be a major concern as 75-150 mm (3-6 inches) will be common within 100 miles of the coastline from north of Cooktown southward to Mackay. Local amounts over 250 mm (10 inches) will be possible across the region, especially from Cairns northward.

By Monday the cyclone will be in a much weakened state as it moves farther southeast off the coast of Queensland with no further widespread damaging winds or flooding rainfall expected over land.

More at AccuWeather: Queensland in Path of Dangerous Cyclone Ita

By Eric Leister

Over the past few days, Tropical Cyclone Ita strengthened as it moved westward through the Coral Sea, reaching the equivalent of a hurricane.

Ita is expected to strengthen further in the coming days as it tracks westward and then makes a turn toward the south later this week. Ita has the potential contain winds similar to that of a category 3 hurricane as it approaches the coastline of northern Queensland on Friday.

The above satellite image shows Tropical Cyclone Ita on Monday, courtesy of UW-CIMSS.

The expected track will take the cyclone into an area north of Cairns, an area with a lower population than areas further south. This region is known for mining and national parks.

Peak winds at the time of landfall could reach as high as 215 kph (135 mph), leading to down trees and power lines with the potential for some minor structural damage.

As Ita approaches the coastline of Queensland a turn toward the south will occur taking the storm toward Cairns, but also weakening it due to moving inland.

Ita will then continue to the south or southeast just inland across Queensland over the weekend spreading heavy rainfall into Cairns and Townsville. Wind gusts over 50 mph will accompany the storm as it moves southward.

RELATED:
Australia Weather Center
Flood Threat Remains for Philippines From Peipah
World’s Heaviest 48-Hour Rainfall Confirmed as More Than 98 Inches

Rainfall will also be a concern as 75-150 mm (3-6 inches) will be common within 100 miles of the coastline from north of Cooktown southward to Mackay. Local amounts over 250 mm (10 inches) will be possible across the region.

The heaviest rainfall can total more than 150 mm (6 inches) near where Ita makes a landfall and along its track over the Cape York Peninsula.

More at AccuWeather: Queensland in Path of Cyclone Ita

 

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Residents of the Philippines are being put on alert for future flood threats from Tropical Storm Peipah.

AccuWeather.com Meteorologist Eric Wanenchak is especially concerned for impacts across the southern Philippines given how unusually far south in the western Pacific Ocean Peipah developed.

“[The southern Philippines] do not get hit by tropical systems very often,” stated Wanenchak. The majority of tropical storms and typhoons form too far to the north to take aim at these islands.

Wanenchak expects the track of Peipah, through the point of landfall, to mirror Super Typhoon Bopha from late 2012 closely. Bopha slammed into the island of Mindanao in the southern Philippines.

The good news is that a repeat of Bopha’s super typhoon status is not expected. However, the warm waters of the Pacific and the absence of disruptive wind shear will allow for some additional strengthening over the next several days.

The storm will likely further intensity into a stronger tropical storm. It is not out of the question that Peipah reaches minimal typhoon strength, becoming the first typhoon of the year to threaten the Philippines.

RELATED:
AccuWeather.com Hurricane Center
Philippines Weather Center
El Nino May Tame Atlantic Hurricanes

Peipah is likely to reach the Philippine island of Mindanao by midweek with flooding rain and damaging winds.

There is concern that the tropical storm will then stall in the vicinity of Mindanao or the Visayas islands. Flooding is sure to result if this occurs as more torrential rain will be unleashed. Mudslides may ensue in the higher terrain.

AccuWeather.com meteorologists are also monitoring the possibility of Peipah stalling or significant slowing its forward progress before reaching the Philippines. That would delay the arrival of the heavy rain and flood threat in the Philippines until later in the week.

More at AccuWeather: Philippines Put on Alert for Tropical Storm Peipah

list-of-weather-links

By Ken Jorgustin

The following list of weather links include real-time data and radar, satellite, severe thunderstorm and tornado outlooks and warnings, lightning, maps, temperatures, pressure, tsunami, buoy data, and other weather related sites for your weather preparedness…
 
Radar: 10 U.S. Regional Loops, plus Alaska and Hawaii.
U.S. Regional Radar

Radar: Full-screen, Zoom, Layers
iMap Weather

Radar: Large High Resolution U.S.; click within the map to zoom to local radar.
Radar – National Mosaic – Full Resolution

Temperature: Current U.S. Temps and Contours
Continental U.S. Temperatures

Temperature: High Temp Forecast Map
U.S. Map: High Temperature Forecast

Temperature: Low Temp Forecast Map
U.S. Map: Low Temperature Forecast

Satellite: Links from NOAA Satellite and Information Service
Weather Satellite links from NESDIS

Satellite: ‘GOES’ East and West
GOES Project Science

Severe: Real-time Severe Weather Warnings List
Severe Weather & Flash Flood Warnings

Drought: Map from the University of Nebraska.
US Drought Monitor

Lightning: Real-time Map of the U.S.
VAISALA – Real-time Lightning Map U.S.

Buoy: Worldwide Buoy Data weather conditions, wave heights, ocean temperatures
National Data Buoy Center

Ocean: Temperature – U.S. Navy Real-Time Ocean Forecast System
Pacific Tsunami Warning Center

Observations: NOAA Web Mapping Portal to real-time observations and data
noaa’s nowCOAST

Storm Outlook: Today’s Convective Outlooks (Thunderstorms, Tornadoes) NOAA
Current Convective Outlooks

Radio: Listen to NOAA Weather Radio Broadcasts from around the country.
NOAA Weather Radio – online

Cams: Thousands of Weather Cams from around the US.
Weather Webcams

Model: ECMWF ‘EURO’ Weather Model Page (the most reliable of them all)
ECMWF ‘EURO’ Model Page

Track: ‘Spaghetti’ Tracks: Tropical, Hurricane, Cyclone (NOAA Earth System Research Laboratory)
Hurricane, Tropical, ‘Spaghetti’ Tracks

Forecast: Map for tomorrow
Tomorrow’s Forecast

Wind: Current Winds of the Earth
Animated Current Winds

Barometer: Barometric Pressure Map U.S.
Current Barometric Pressure Map of the U.S.

 
Share your favorite weather links in the comments section below…

More at Modern Survival Blog: A List of Weather Links