Survival skills

All posts tagged Survival skills

[Editor’s Note: A mad max scenario is one of the worst-case scenarios one can prepare for. The adage “if you can’t protect you don’t own it” rings true in this case. Long-term survival plans that reflect this type of disaster suggest preppers getting away from urban and suburban living and heading for hills. While this would be the safest option, there are dangers that lurk for those who plan to “live off the land.” Because in a post-collapse world – they will come for all that you own.]

By Jeremiah Johnson –  Ready Nutrition

Seems almost self-explanatory, right?  I mean, what could be so involved with the term “living with the land,” right?  There is a lot to it.  There’s a reason to do this:

Living with the land will help you to live, and avoid the greatest hunter of all: man. Men…mankind…has the same instincts as you, the same success in the generations as you.  Although this is not an “anthropological” treatise, it holds a lot of anthropology within it, because there are a few key points you must keep in mind: Your weakness is a weakness shared by other men; your strength is a strength possessed by other men; what you can do can be done by other men.

The commonality is both your strength and your weakness.  You become cold, and so does the man (or men) hunting you. The dark poses impediments and unknown dangers, and it does the same to your hunters.

Turn the Hunters Into the Hunted

You can turn the hunters into the hunted…for you are a hunter: it is “hard-wired” in you through a thousand generations of successful hunters, warriors, and killers. You need to eat, and so do your pursuers.  You need water, and so do they.  You can track, and so can they.  You have senses that can detect man, and so do they.  All of this, yes, you know, I’m sure.

But have you considered it all?  Really considered it?

The land: to blend with it, and to live with it without being obtrusive is the key to avoiding the hunters…and remember that they have the same limitations as you.  The more pure and “clear” you keep your senses, the better they’ll work for you.  We have done some pieces on the way the eye works, and the sense of smell.  This is the time to do your work…your training to use these senses to their maximum capabilities.  Let’s cover some basics as to what to expect when you’re living with the land and avoiding marauders, foreign soldiers, forces of a dictatorial government, and so forth.

10 Ways To Avoid Marauders and Looters After the Collapse

  1. Don’t travel the heavily-traveled: stay off of paths and trails and cover your tracks, as most people (and anyone hunting you) will use them. Busting brush will ensure you’re safer.
  2. What’s easy for you is easy for them: taking the harder path will oftentimes confuse and discourage them.
  3. You lay a trail for dogs or men: your scent for the dogs and your tracks for the men. Defeat both: use “blue” (water) features to disguise and throw off the scent, being careful not to leave footprints in banks or mud.
  4. Opposite actions and times: You sleep during the daytime, travel at night. I have emphasized this (to the “chagrin” of naysayers galore) in previous articles…you have to develop the ability to move at night.  When they’re eating, be on the move.  When they’re awake, you stay in a hide site.
  5. Boobytrap all avenues of approach and high-traffic areas: punji stakes, pits, and IED’s (Improvised Explosive Devices). Heaven forbid!  Do you want to win, or just play “good guys and bad guys” in the woods?  There is going to come a time to act and not just sit around with all of your canned fruits and stored supplies.  Hopefully, that time will come later, so that you can prepare for it.
  6. Key choke points use for an ambush, and to circle around them: As they pass through a defile, backtrack on them.  Or ambush them in the defile.  A rock slide is a beautiful thing that can be initiated with a minor amount of explosives
  7. Use the animals as cover: following them will throw off the trail of the dogs. It will also say something for your tracking ability to be able to follow a small herd of deer or elk.
  8. Your pursuers can be “distracted”: I’ll leave it to you to figure out what to leave for them….the standard fare can be imagined. Your job is to avoid them or to “deal” with them, not to “win them over to your side.”
  9. Do not underestimate their tenacity: they may have you greatly outgunned, with multiple “shifts” to put on you to allow you only a scant amount of rest and sleep. This is where endurance and physical training comes into play: the “thing” that nobody wants to hear about.
  10. If it looks as if it’s a good hide site in plain view?  Then it’s not, and they will be sure to check it.  Don’t put yourself underground even before they catch you.

One of the things you’re going to have to do is practice, as well as reinforce your plan of action for when the time comes.  Sound boring?  It’s better than going to some mall and spending all day meandering around with a herd of beeves.  You have to develop these skills so they’re ready to employ at a moment’s notice.  The knowledge is not enough: you have to put it into practicum.  That’s the only way to test yourself and know your capabilities.  Falls in line with the Army saying, “Know yourself and seek self-improvement.”  Don’t stagnate: improve.  Learn to live with the land, or you may not make it through…when “the man” comes around.  JJ out!

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition: Surviving a Mad Max World: How To Avoid Marauders and Looters After the Collapse

About the author:

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

 

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By TaraModern Survival Online

When the SHTF, information will become a very powerful commodity. Initially, the breaking news about the doomsday disaster will likely blare from the television screen, radio, the internet in general and social media platforms in particular. But, those high tech methods of communications so many people currently take for granted, will almost assuredly cease within possibly hours to days after the apocalyptic event began.

There really isn’t a single SHTF scenario that will not, sooner or later, impact or completely take down the power grid. Whether the disaster is natural or man-made, or even a pandemic, at some point, workers will be unable to too fearful, to return to their place of employment.

After the initial stages of the doomsday disaster, local news is going to probably become far more important and critical to your survival than national news. If we are in the midst of a Red Dawn type World War 3 scenario, you will want to know how the battle is going everywhere on American soil, but learning about hostilities occurring in or near your neck of the woods, will be an immediate and ongoing necessity.

Whether your are bugging in or bugging out, knowing what is going on around you should be a priority. The news you collect will guide you to making informed decisions that will impact both the immediate and long-term survival of your family or mutual assistance group.

If modern communications systems go down immediately after a SHTF scenario, a communications plan – and a low tech backup, should be practiced and in place. The odds of you and your loved ones being all together or at home when the apocalypse hits are at the very best, 50 percent.

Continue reading at Modern Survival Online: How to Acquire Intelligence Post-SHTF

By Tess Pennington – Ready Nutrition 

With the unusual winter weather that many parts of the country are experiencing, driving conditions will be harsh and potentially dangerous. Moreover, getting stranded in your vehicle could become a very real threat, especially if you are traveling in isolated parts of the country. If this happens, you have a potentially dangerous survival situation on your hands.

Most people’s instinct will tell them to leave the car and go for help. If you are in a desolate area, you may not know how far help is and leaving your car will expose you and could get you lost in the wilderness if you don’t know where you are going.

6 Critical Tips You Need to Know In Order To Survive Being Stranded in Your Car in Freezing Temperatures


OK, let’s put your survival know-how to the test. Here’s the scenario:

At 3 p.m., a last minute work order has requested you to deliver some equipment but you must drive through a remote area where the road’s elevation is between 4,000 and 4,500 feet. The road is infamous for people who don’t know the area to take in the wintertime and get stuck, but you’ve driven it a few times and feel confident you can make it before dark. Before you set out, you turn on your GPS on your cell phone just in case. You’ve also checked the weather station, which turns out is calling for unexpected snow flurries in the area, but you’re on a deadline and will drive very carefully. 

Not a lot of people are driving on the road and you wish you could be at home too. The snow has been coming down for most of the trip making the roads slick. An hour into driving, you unknowingly make a wrong turn and end up on a remote logging road. The snow is really coming down making it difficult to see and you are losing daylight fast.

You curse your GPS for not telling you where to turn but realize you’ve lost signal and have no idea where you are. You decide to turn the car around and go out the way you came. As you get to the edge of the road, you lose traction and slide into a snow bank. 

As you try to free the car from the snow bank, the car won’t budge. You feel yourself panicking as you weigh all the problems – you’ve taken a wrong turn and are on a remote logging road, no one is in sight, you’re stuck in a snow bank and it’s dark outside. 


How to Survive Being Stranded in Your Car in Winter

So, what would you do if you were in this situation? Do you have the skills to get out alive?

Let’s look at some considerations to keep in mind:

  1. Keep calm. In this type of situation, you could be stranded for hours or in some cases, days. Mental preparedness is key and you must think rationally and logically. This is easier said than done when you’re in a survival situation.
  2. Stay in your car. Above all, exposure will be your greatest threat. Survival experts stress that it is easier for authorities to find you in your car than find you wandering in unknown territory.
  3. Have a vehicle preparedness kit. This emergency kit should reflect the season your area is experiencing and the terrain you are driving through. In winter, you want to have preps on hand to keep the core body warm. Items like a whistle, brightly colored rag or ribbon, thermos, hand warmers, emergency blankets, emergency beacon, a first aid kit, and flashlight. For a more in-depth article on critical items to carry in your vehicle, click here.
  4. Have survival food and water in the car at all times. Keep the basics in mind for food and water. Snow can be melted for water (have a portable water filter in your preparedness car kit. Protein bars, MRE’s or easy survival foods can be utilized for this emergency situation.
  5. Make your car visible. Have a bright colored rag or ribbon and tie it onto your car so that search parties can find you. Even using a reflective sun shade could help alert authorities to your whereabouts.
  6. Run your vehicle every 10 minutes. If your gasoline amount allows, run your vehicle to stay warm. You can bring heat to the interior of the car and charge your cell phone at the same time. Note: Make sure the exhaust pipe of the car is unobstructed from snow. If snow is covering the pipe, this could cause exhaust fumes to enter your car and cause health issues.

To survive this type of emergency, you must fight your instinct to leave. Staying with the vehicle will provide you shelter, warmth and if you have emergency supplies, you could have all you need to survive. No doubt that these life-saving tips will help you keep calm, think rationally and, ultimately, survive.

About the author:

The Prepper's Blueprint

Tess Pennington is the author of The Prepper’s Blueprint, a comprehensive guide that uses real-life scenarios to help you prepare for any disaster. Because a crisis rarely stops with a triggering event the aftermath can spiral, having the capacity to cripple our normal ways of life. The well-rounded, multi-layered approach outlined in the Blueprint helps you make sense of a wide array of preparedness concepts through easily digestible action items and supply lists.

Tess is also the author of the highly rated Prepper’s Cookbook, which helps you to create a plan for stocking, organizing and maintaining a proper emergency food supply and includes over 300 recipes for nutritious, delicious, life-saving meals.

Visit her web site at ReadyNutrition.com for an extensive compilation of free information on preparedness, homesteading, and healthy living.

 

Practical Skills

By Ken Jorgustin – Modern Survival Blog

Most professional worker skills today are hinged with our modern day way of life. The majority of people in the United States generally work in services rather than manufacturing / hands-on.

Preparedness for the ‘here and now’
Preparedness for the potential ‘after’

Having practical skills are beneficial for the now and potentially the ‘after’. ‘After’ meaning a time of post-collapse, a depression era perhaps.

Continue reading at Modern Survival Blog: Practical Skills for Hands On and Preparedness Viability

By Jeremiah Johnson – Ready Nutrition

ReadyNutrition Guys and Gals, this article is presented by request of one of the readers.  Here is the requesting comment, as posted to the recent METL (Mission Essential Task List) article of mine:

RedClay: “How about a list of circumstances for when it’s time to bug out. I’m amazed on prepper discussion boards about bugging out, at how many people are going to hit the road to bug out BEFORE the crowds mob the roads. But how will people know when to bug out? What combination of signs or circumstances will one depend on, in that decision? If one waits until it’s obvious, then everyone will know & be on the roads.”

So, as you can see, this is a common question in everyone’s mind, and not unusual by any means.  We have presented articles in the past to help you gauge by different sources how to prepare and when something is likely to happen.  Let’s jump into this in-depth!

One of the problems with preparation is the desire for an exact forecast of when the end of the world is going to occur.  First, allow me to state I’m Jeremiah Johnson, not the Prophet Jeremiah.  Secondly, anyone who claims to be a Prophet (not to delve into didactics) may not necessarily be one.  So, what to do?

If You See These 14 Signs It’s Time to Bug Out

What you do is observe what is happening and estimate…comparing possible with probable and coming up with the best course of action…and act when you know and feel it is the time to do so.

There are keys to show you that everything is going down.  The more that occur simultaneously, the higher the probability that it’s time to get out of town.  Let’s list some of them (and some of these may surprise you):

  1. complete collapse of the markets (a lagging indicator, but hitting rock bottom is a sign that it is gone), to include the Baltic Dry Index, and all commodities markets.
  2. The President, Vice-President, and members of Congress and the Pentagon “disappear” very suddenly and noticeably… (probably heading to a bunker on your taxed dime)
  3. National Guard and Active Duty troops and vehicles are out on the highways all of a sudden, moving out of cities and off of military establishments.
  4. A nationwide bank “holiday” for all banks occurs, with all accounts frozen…this would be very bad.
  5. Foreign military forces on the move either in the vicinity of or to the United States
  6. Outright declaration of either hostilities or an emergency condition by the MSM (mainstream media)
  7. Over a course of time: key members of industry, banking, and the government take “extended vacations” and disappear from the public eye.
  8. Sudden shortages or halts in the shipments of food, medicines, fuel, or any other necessary item…without any warning. Think Venezuela.
  9. Heavy troop and police movements and coordinating activities in major metropolitan areas
  10. Hospitals tasked with any kind of mass-casualty emergency preparations
  11. Numbers 1-10 happening simultaneously in foreign nations along with the U.S.
  12. Increased police and military checkpoints and restrictions on travel domestically or internationally
  13. Decoupling of financial markets and banks overseas and in foreign nations.
  14. Recall of any and all ambassadors and staff back to the United States on short notice.

We have mentioned a list of things here, but the list is not extensive.  I moved to Montana years ago and have taken necessary steps that my preparations are now in place.  This is key: to accomplish these objectives long before any of those listed items materialize, as those are “late” signs that something will occur.

If people all paid attention to things, then perhaps we would have a Civil Defense system in place.  The truth of the matter, to respectfully address RedClay’s concerns, is that even at the penultimate moment of truth, most will ignore the signs.  It’s not that everyone cannot be saved or alerted: it is that they will not pay attention to the signs even when it’s all coming down around them.

Best advice: have your plans in place long before all of this happens, be prepared to depend on yourself and your family alone, prepare today as if disaster will strike tomorrow, and don’t let anyone know your business.  Keep in that good fight.  JJ out!

 

Additional Reading Material:

How To Create a Coordinated Bug Out Plan

The Prepper’s Conundrum: To Bug in or Bug Out? Part 1Part 2Part 3

What If Your Preparedness Plan Isn’t As Sound As You Think

Using Layers to Build Your Preparedness Supply

Bugging Out: Preparing Multiple Escape Routes and Vehicles for a Major Emergency

Every Prepper Should Have Multiple Bug-Out Bags. Here’s Why.

This information has been made available by Ready NutritionIf You See These 14 Signs It’s Time to Bug Out
About the author:

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

 

9 Overlooked Things That Can Go Wrong With Your Survival Plan

By Rich M – Off The Grid News

There’s a saying in the military that no plan survives contact with the enemy. This is a pretty good thing for us to keep in mind, as preppers. While we may not have a human enemy that has a vote in whether or not our plan will succeed, we can say that the disasters that we face and the need to survive are our enemy. As such, we should recognize that whatever survival plans we have won’t necessarily survive more than about five seconds after the disaster hits.

This was brought home to me by the hurricanes we had this year. While I was not caught in any of them, Hurricane Harvey looked like it was headed right for my home, before it veered north to attack Corpus Christi and Houston. But it was my after-action review of these hurricanes that made me realize that no matter how good any of our plans might be, we may not be able to use them, because nature and circumstances get a vote in their effectiveness.

Continue reading at Off The Grid news: 9 Overlooked Things That Can Go Wrong With Your Survival Plan

Image Source: Pixabay.com

By Staff Writer – The Survival Place Blog

If you love nothing more than getting away from the city and adventuring out into the wild, you will likely love the idea of getting away for a camping trip at the weekend. As it’s still winter right now, it can be pretty unforgiving in the wild at night, and you will need to prepare a lot more for your trip out into the wild.

Camping in the winter might be cold, but it is also very tranquil and fun. Not many people choose the winter time to come out camping, so you will likely have the whole space to yourself, and beyond all that, you will be able to enjoy watching the stars and cuddling up beside the fire when the sun goes down.

If you want to shed a few post Christmas pounds and have a break with your family, get yourself a tent and head out into the wild this weekend. Before you go though here is a list of the winter camping essentials which you’ll need to take with you on the trip.

Navigation

For navigation, you will want a GPS or your phone, and also a compass and map just in case you run out of power and signal in the forest.

Sun protection

Although you might think that the sun can’t damage you in the winter, it is actually slightly lower at this time of year so you could end up burnt if you are out for too long. Bring along some sunscreen, sunglasses and lip balm to protect your lips from cracking in the cold.

Insulation
It goes without saying that you are in need of some layers in the winter. Mountain Goat Outdoor Apparel provides a range of thermal underwear, tops, fleeces, jackets, pants, gloves and hats to keep you warm and protected against the harsh conditions outside.

Light

Because the days are much shorter in the winter, you will need a few forms of light to keep you going. You will need a flashlight, headlamp and batteries ready in case they run out during the trip.

First-aid

Of course, every trip into the wild needs a first aid kit. You can get a kit from any drugstore for a great price.

Fire

If you are going to be spending some cold nights out in the wild and cooking food, you are going to need a fire to keep you and your food warm. Bring either a fire lighting kit, some matches or a lighter with you and you will be able to collect wood and make a fire on site.

Tools

In case of emergencies, bring along a Swiss Army knife, cooking equipment and duct tape.

Food

Potatoes, meat,  vegetables and of course marshmallows are a must here.

Water

Always pack more water than you will need, because you never know if something will go wrong. It may be useful to bring a water filter to if you need to drink from the river or lake.

Shelter

It goes without saying that you can’t go camping without a tent, sleeping bag and blankets!