Survival kit

All posts tagged Survival kit

People, Camping, Hiking, Trekking, Forest, Woods

Image Source: Pixabay.com

By Staff Writer – The Survival Place Blog

TV presenters such as Bear Grylls have made surviving in the wilderness cool. Even President Barack Obama spent a few days with Mr. Grylls for a trek across the Alaskan wilderness. Essentially it was a great TV show in which President Obama could chat about climate change, his family and home life while at the same time looking effortlessly cool with a survival expert. Survival skills are worthwhile. You may never find yourself stranded in the middle of a jungle or without water in a desert, but you just might enjoy the thrill of a survival skills weekend. Read on to explore the what every survivalist needs in their backpack.

Safety First

A first aid kit is the most fundamental bit of kit you should be packing. Accidents happen, and while there will be tree sap somewhere in the forest that may help with the gash on your hand, it’s always safer to clean it with an antiseptic wipe and stick on a band-aid. Ensure you have painkillers, band-aids, gauze, antiseptic and bandages as a bare minimum.

Know Where You Are

Gone are the days of navigating by the stars; get yourself a nifty little compass. This tiny feat of engineering can slip into your pocket and can save you from getting stranded. Used in conjunction with a map or ordinance survey record, you will be able to locate key points along your trail or within your environment.

Blend In

If you are keen to take on the true survivalist mentality, then it’s essential that you get yourself some effective camouflage gear. Camo has been around for years, used by armed forces and survivalists across the globe. A more effective range of 3D camo now enables you to blend even more efficiently into your surroundings by using laser cut leaves to break up your outline. If you find yourself hunting animals for food, your camo gear can make or break whether you will be going to sleep having had a satisfying meal.

Tools

It’s vital that you pack tools that have a range of uses. With a swat knife, you can build a shelter and start a fire. Find a swat knife that is durable and locks open and closed to prevent accidents.

In Case Of Emergency

It doesn’t happen very often, but you may need to call for help. As a survivalist wanting to get away from it all, it may pain you to take a phone with you, but you don’t even have to switch it on and can leave it floundering at the bottom of your bag. Just make sure you have one. A cellphone is vital if you are going to ensure your safety at all times.

If you are just starting out learning about survival techniques, think about meeting like minded people on a survival course. You’ll be able to venture into the woods, and with expert tuition, you’ll get to test your newfound skills in a safe and controlled environment. Any wilderness is a daunting place, but treat them with respect, and you can enjoy the challenges they present.

This article was originally published at The Survival Place Blog: Essential Items For The Ultimate Survival Kit

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Emergency Lighting Ideas for Your Holiday Survival Kit | Backdoor Survival

By Gaye Levy – Backdoor Survival

There are days when I think that I am taking steps to earn a PhD in emergency lighting.  Having 4 different flashlights in my nightstand has certainly earned me a masters degree, don’t you think?

Staying with the topic of emergency lighting, today I am introducing three items from OxyLED that are nifty emergency lighting ideas for your holiday survival kit.  One is a combination solar motion detector and lamp, another is a headlamp with motion sensor, and the last is a powerful rechargeable flashlight.

I have been testing all three items for the past few weeks and find each of them worthy of finding their way into your survival kit.  The best part, though, is that I have one of each to giveaway. More about that in a moment because first I want to give you the rundown on each of these items.

Continue reading at Backdoor Survival: Emergency Lighting Ideas for Your Holiday Survival Kit + Giveaway

About the author:

Gaye Levy started Backdoor Survival so that she could share her angst and concern about our deteriorating economy and its impact on ordinary, middle-class folks. She also wanted to become a prepper of the highest order and to share her knowledge as she learned it along the way. On Backdoor Survival you will find survival and preparedness tools and tips for creating a self-reliant lifestyle through thoughtful prepping and optimism.

To read more from Gaye, visit her website, Backdoor Survival. You can also follow Gaye on Facebook, Twitter, Google+ and Pinterest or purchase her eBook, The Prepper’s Guide to Food Storage on Amazon.com.

ten-essential-survival-kit-items

By Ken Jorgustin – Modern Survival Blog

Here is a list of 10 essential items which you might choose as a minimum to start any survival kit. Then build up and tailor the kit from there – depending on a specific purpose (for the kit), your personal preferences, etc..

When deciding what to include in a survival kit, first think about where you’re going to use it. Is it for your car? In your backpack on a day hike? A week-long camping trip? A bug-out bag with 72-hour previsions? etc. This will alter what you might choose to include.

Also think about the resources that may already be available in the area where you plan to be. This again will affect the decisions that you make as to what to include in the kit.

The following items are intended to present ideas to spark your own thoughts:

Continue reading at Modern Survival Blog: 10 Essential Items in a Survival Kit

basic-survival-kit-list

By Ken Jorgustin – Modern Survival Blog

Putting together a so called basic emergency kit (and/or being sure that you have the essentials) is a simple and responsible thing to do. What goes into a ‘basic’ survival kit for home? Items that are purposed towards the most common or likely disaster that could occur in your own geographical area which will enable you to better deal with the follow-on consequences for a relatively short period of time (most emergencies are over within hours or days).

The basic emergency kit to keep at home might include the following items as a minimal recommendation:

Continue reading at Modern Survival Blog: BASIC Disaster Supplies – Emergency Survival Kit

SurvivalFishing

By Pat Henry – The Prepper Journal

Imagine a gathering of 10,000 preppers at a convention somewhere in the heart of Las Vegas and at that convention every single prepper had brought their own fully stocked bug out bag. The same bug out bags that each person had diligently packed using checklists gleaned from various prepping blogs, YouTube videos and their own personal experience. I would bet that a high percentage of them, maybe 90% or greater would have one very simple piece of gear in there somewhere along with the fire-steel, water filters, emergency blankets and survival knives. They would all have a survival fishing kit.

The survival tin, which is usually the container for the survival fishing kit is I think one of the most discussed pieces of gear in prepper circles. A quick search on YouTube finds well over 100,000 videos of preppers showing the contents of their tins, opening up the survival tins they receive from internet shopping and discussing the range of life saving implements they have been able to squirrel away in the confines of these small boxes.

I think the survival tin is so popular for a couple of reasons. They are really simple to make, just grab an assortment of items that you think can help you out if you are ever faced with some life or death survival scenarios. All you need, generally speaking are items that many of us already have lying around our homes somewhere. I put the contents of a sample survival kit below.

  • SurvivalKit
  • Rubber Band
  • Small flashlight
  • Waterproof matches
  • Leatherman Micra
  • Ziploc bag
  • Wire saw
  • Basic sewing kit
  • Tissues
  • Survival fishing kit
  • Safety pins
  • Mirror – for signaling
  • Pencils
  • Compass
  • Can opener
  • Emergency whistle
  • Small candle
  • Snare wire
  • Flint and tinder
  • Water purification tablets
  • Spare knife

Most of us can see the utility in having these items in our possession. The survival tin is designed to hold this potentially life-saving gear in a relatively compact form that is easy enough to slip in your pocket everyday as you head out the door. This is a mandatory part of many prepper’s EDC gear and I agree that if you had this in your pocket and were dumped in the middle of nowhere, next to a river at 0 Dark 30, you would be much better off than someone who had nothing. At least you could use the flashlight to see your way to using your flint and tinder to make a fire. Then you could take the survival fishing kit to catch a nice big trout for your sustenance. But for the rest of us who aren’t subjected to the life of a hypothetical Bear Grylls episode and aren’t dropped anywhere, does a survival fishing kit make much sense at all or is it wasting space in our bug out bags, backpacks and pants pockets? Is it giving you a false hope for food that might never materialize?

SimpleFishingKit

Does it make sense to have a survival fishing kit in your Bug out Bag?

I am not a big fish eater to be perfectly honest, but I grew up fishing with my friends in the neighborhood where we lived. In our area we had two fairly decent sized lakes within a short walk through the woods. In these lakes, we caught plenty of brim, crappie, bass and even a catfish or two. I completely understand the rationale behind having a way to catch fish as food and if you get lucky, a decent sized fish or even several smaller fish could provide a nice meal which if you are starving, could save your life.

There are dozens of survival fishing kits already assembled.

But fishing isn’t just as simple as throwing a hook into the water. Along with that survival fishing kit, you need the right bait, a good bit of luck and a small amount of skill and patience. Come to think of it, a lot of hunting activities share those traits. I think that many preppers assume that if they only have that handy little survival fishing kit in their bags they will be bringing a feast back to the campsite with ease. This is yet another one of the myths that I think preppers believe about bugging out to the woods.

I think that having the ability to even try your hand at fishing during a survival situation is going to come down to several factors but the top two that come to mind are your location and your availability to fish. Are you bugging out where there are any lakes, ponds or rivers with fish in them? Are you on the move? Can you stop and risk the exposure of fishing? Can you afford to alert others with a fire and the smell of fresh fish cooking? How large is your group?

You might argue that the supplies you need for a good fishing kit are so small and insignificant when it comes to weight that they are good to have anyway. I can buy that, but I think that some people are hanging their hopes on their perceived ability to put food on the blanket and simply having some hooks, weights and fishing line in your survival tin doesn’t guarantee you will catch anything or even find a place to fish in the first place.

What goes into a good survival fishing kit?

The contents of a survival fishing kit are pretty basic and true to the survival tin idea, they don’t need to take up much space. Could you fashion your own hooks with a soda can tab or natural materials and leave the fishing kit at home? Sure but for the size and weight I would rather have the real thing. Fishing line is hard to replicate in nature and it really doesn’t cost much at all to put these supplies together.

A good survival fishing kit should have at a minimum:

  • 50 ft. of sturdy mono-filament fishing line. 20lb test or higher will reduce the chance of it breaking. You can use a stick to wrap your line around similar to how a kite string works.
  • Assorted hooks for the fish in your area
  • Bobbers or you can use any material that will float like a piece of Styrofoam or wood.
  • Sinkers
  • Fishing lures or fake worms, whatever works best for your area. If you don’t know just ask the guy behind the counter at the place you are buying the fish hooks.


If you have fishing supplies at home, this should be easy to pull together or if you would rather buy a pre-built kit they have plenty of survival fishing kits online and most are less than the price of a meal out. Knowledge of basic knots that won’t come undone easily will help you here also. It would really suck to finally catch a nice fish only to have the hook come off the line as you are nearing shore and your dinner swim away into the deep.

So what is my answer to the question I posed at the beginning? I think because they are so compact and could give you the ability to catch fish if the right situation presented itself, a survival fishing kit makes a good addition to your bag. I would only expect to be able to use this in certain situations/locations though and not as a reliable source of food for survival. It’s the same with snares and traps, they can catch game for you but you have to be incredibly lucky to have an animal wander through the woods to your trap in the first place so don’t bet the farm on these two methods unless you are already living remotely well before the collapse. These make good supplies to have in my opinion, but not realistic food gathering options unless you are extremely lucky in a bug out scenario. Once the dust has settled and you are all living like nomads, then a good fishing kit would be a great idea.

What do you think?

This information has been made available by The Prepper Journal: Survival Fishing Kit: Worth the Time or Useless Gear?

man in postapocalyptic landscape wit survival gear and gas mask

By  – SurvivoPedia

Did you ever think about rope and survival in the same sentence or scenario?

Well, if you didn’t, you should from now on because one of THE essential items in any respectable survival kit or bug out bag is a strong, solid piece of rope. What kind of rope should you use, though?

To tell you the truth folks, the old-school rope used by our ancestors to drag stones, tie up vindictive wives and hang total strangers is almost obsolete; paracord is the new kid on the block for good reason but we’ll get to that in a minute.

Now, if you were wondering about what type of rope you should buy, and why, for your BOB or your emergency survival kit (because there are lots of choices on the market, believe me), this article is about to enlighten you.

Let’s start with the most common types of outdoor/survival ropes commercially available and later in the article we’ll concentrate on the best choice. You’ve probably already guessed which we think is best but let’s play it by the book and give you your options so you can decide for yourself.

The twisted rope aka laid rope looks like a spiral and it’s usually made of three strands (polypropylene wire most of the time) twisted together, hence the name. This is not the strongest nor the best rope design out there but nevertheless, it has its uses – it’s impervious to water and it also sinks, unlike many others types of rope – and it’s dirt cheap.

Definitely not a good choice for a survival rope, though. It rots quickly and isn’t agile. Also, it’s bulky and the individual strands aren’t that useful alone. In this case, you get what you pay for but it’s better than nothing in a pinch.

Twisted rope

Braided ropes are built by weaving fiber strands and come in 2 types: hollow and double braided. This kind of rope is very popular in marine applications but for survival, we would stay away from this beast. Braided ropes rot quickly, they stretch and they don’t unbraid well. They are fairly strong when new, though.

Continue reading at SurvivoPedia: Types Of Rope And Why You Need Them

what-is-a-survival-kit

By Ken Jorgustin – Modern Survival Blog

A survival kit can be many things or just a few things, and it serves its most common purpose to help get you safely to your next destination.

What is a survival kit?

Whereas most survival kit lists are those of specific ‘things’ (of which there are plenty similar lists on our site), this time I decided to approach it a bit differently. A survival kit might be any of the following:
An insurance policy.

A personal and unique set of ‘tools’.

Different from one to the next.

A set of things to keep you alive, safe, mobile.

Some of them are portable while others are meant for home.

Some will fit in your pockets as every day carry, others in a back pack.

They are big, small, and all in-between.

A motivation of self-reliance.

Continue reading at Modern Survival Blog: What Is A Survival Kit