Survival and Primitive Technology

All posts tagged Survival and Primitive Technology

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The Survival Place – Staff Writer

Being at one with nature has to come second. Being at one with yourself is much more important. Being confident in your skills of proficiency in a scenario where you’re left to your own devices, is the key to many survival mindsets. Being self-sufficient is perhaps the best ability you can have when you’re going out hiking, trekking up a mountain, or suddenly being lost out in the woods during a camping trip. However, it doesn’t come naturally to most people; therefore, it does put them off from going out and taking charge of their own adventure. But it can be learned, and much of that has to do with knowing what kinds of skills can be supplemented by modern technology. The combination of knowing the basics and being proficient in them can be complemented to a greater extent with the aid of gadgets that enhance those skills.

Map reading and orientation

Knowing where you are on a map is paramount to being aware of where you came from, where you are and which direction you should be travelling in. Without the know-how to reading a map, you can only turn back around and restart your adventure. You can learn how to read a map online with many different options at your disposal. You can play online games, watch detailed and lengthy walkthroughs from the basics of advanced techniques on video sharing websites, as well as the good old fashioned way of learning from a skilled bushcraft teacher. Together with this, you can get a GPS electronic map, which can pinpoint your location with precision. This kind of portable, handheld technology is great as a backup for your map reading skills and imperative in a life and death situation.

Forging ahead in the dark

Sometimes when you’re out on adventures, the night can suddenly take you by surprise. Without the proper technology and gadgets to help you see in the dark, you will have to bed for the night, exactly where you are at that moment. There are some great reviews on http://offthegridguru.com/ for tactical flashlights that are small and extremely useful in a tight situation. They can also be attached to things like clothing, hats and fitting onto your backpack. There are other reviews on the website that include tactical tomahawks which are useful cutting and shaping tools. Military watches are also put under the spotlight, but more of all, the tactical torches of the modern market are put through their paces.

Image Source: Pixabay.com

Cutting before building

Every single adventurer should be carrying with them a good sharp bushcraft knife. This can cut branches and shape them; it can also help to make you tools which you can use to make other survival necessities. Being self-sufficient starts with being able to carve out tools from pieces of timber, making small changes to equipment, and or cutting through something that is hindering your ability to progress. The knife is the first and foremost tool of anyone looking to take care of themselves on their trip.

Being self-sufficient is one of the keys to being confident during a survival scenario. However being great at the basics can be further improved by the use of modern gadgets and technologies, helping you to survive and thrive in the wildness of nature.

The Survival place Blog: Self-Sufficiency Is A Powerful Tool That Can Be Learned

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By Staff Writer – The Survival Place Blog

Going off grid is something that few people have chosen to do, but those who have would never go back to the way things were before. Going off grid isn’t for everybody, but for the right people, it’ll completely change their lives.

Taking this step isn’t something that should be taken lightly, so you’ll need to consider a few things first. After reading this, you should have a good idea of whether going off grid is truly right for you:

Is Going Off Grid Right For You?

You need to figure out if going off grid is right for you. Ask yourself, do you want to stop paying electricity bills? Are you ok with spending money to create your off grid paradise? Do you want to teach yourself all about alternative energy?

If the answer to those questions is yes, then this could potentially be a good choice for you.

There are plenty of reasons people choose to live in this way. For example, finding a place in the world that you think is absolutely amazing but you’ll have to come off the grid to live there is a perfectly good reason. Producing your own energy and doing other things related to coming off the grid are also good reasons, as they are so empowering. You will be producing your own clean energy, and there’s nothing in the world quite like it. Especially when you’re not receiving utility bills anymore!

Reasons To Go Off Grid

  • Being concerned for the environment. You can use less energy and make your own from renewable resources.
  • You want to eliminate vulnerability from utility outages.
  • Your political/social values.
  • It makes economic sense for you in terms of cost.

The Time Needed To Maintain Your System

Figure out how much time you have to maintain your off-grid system. It’s going to take plenty of work in the beginning, and you’ll more than likely make some mistakes while you figure out what’s right for you. Your lifestyle will need to change considerably, and it can take some getting used to. You’re going to need to pay attention to your energy stores too, so you know you’re not depleting what you have faster than you generate. It takes a lot of thought and planning, but if it’s something you really want, you can do it.

Finding The Money/Resources To Go Off The Grid

Going off the grid doesn’t need to be expensive. You can do so many things to your home to get started and many are inexpensive. Solar panels, for example, or rechargeable batteries can be used to generate your own power. Many of the items you purchase will be a one time payment. There are all kinds of resources online to help you too. You can find out how to make well water drinkable, how to generate your own power from scratch, and more. This will be a huge change of lifestyle, so you need to make the commitment if you decide this is what you want.

You can learn more about becoming energy self-sufficient through various resources. It’ll take time, so if this is what you want to do, make sure you start now.

Is going off grid for you? Leave a comment!

The Survival Place Blog: Going Off Grid: Is It Right For You?

By Mike B. – Guest Post

Survival isn’t just a skill – it’s a conglomeration of many skills, all of which you need to learn, master, and perfect to stay safe, secure, and comfortable in survival situations. Many of these skills are overlooked by preppers who focus purely on stockpiling materials without the know-how needed to use them – or replace them when stores are compromised.

In this article, we’ll give you a run-down of the 5 most important survival skills to master – including why they matter, different techniques you can use, and resources to learn. No matter how well you stock, build, and lock your stores and shelters, you never know when life will throw you a curveball and put your real knowledge to the test. These skills can be used in every situation – from the mundane, to the extreme – so study up, and get ready.

#1: Shelter Building

Any wilderness survivalist will tell you that the in almost all climates, exposure is the biggest threat. Shelter is essential in every situation, whether it’s cold, hot, polluted, exposed to animals, or even seemingly safe. Shelter provides security for your body and your material goods – but sometimes, our pre-prepared shelters become unavailable. Learning how to create your own shelter with the materials around you is absolutely vital to staying safe.

There are several ways to build shelter, and the type you build depends on your surroundings. In cold weather, lean-tos, A-frames, and other enclosed brush shelters can protect you from insects, hypothermia, and rainfall – and all of these can be created using a tarp. In the absence of a tarp, learn to handle a knife – like one of these best combat knives – so you can effectively chop saplings and other vegetation to create your structure. In snow, learn how to dig snow caves – a long-time favorite shelter of mountaineers and explorers that provides a surprising amount of warmth, even in sub-zero temps.

Although it seems counterintuitive, shelter in hot weather is also extremely necessary. Shelter from the sun prevents life-threatening conditions like heat stroke, dehydration, and severe sunburns, and can be used to store perishable goods like freshly hunted meat and fish. Shelter is the first priority of nearly all wilderness survival experts in a tough situation – make sure you’re prepared to make your own in a pinch.

#2: Water Gathering

The next most important skill to learn is water gathering. Although humans can go several weeks without food, we can only last a few days at most without water – and we deteriorate fast. Water is available in all environments, even seemingly dry ones, and learning how to collect it effectively and safely is incredibly important. Here are some tips for different types of climates:

  • In snowy conditions, water isn’t hard to find – but it can be harder to prepare. Snow should be melted before consumed so as not to drop the body temperature dangerously, and try to gather freshly fallen snow or snow pack from high points.
  • In wet climates, rainwater can be collected using buckets, tarp traps, or any other type of container. If possible, filter rainwater before drinking.
  • In dry climates with no precipitation, dew and underground water are your best sources. Dew can be collected in tarp traps in the morning, but it may be scarce. Condensation pits are also useful, and are created by placing a jug or cup into a hole in the ground, insulating, and covering with plastic or a tarp. Condensation from the ground will collect in the cup. Use this water sparingly.

Water is vital to survival – make sure you know how to find it with primitive tools.

#3: Fire Starting

The last of the “big three” basics for survival is fire starting. Fire provides not only heat, but a way to cook and preserve food, signal for help, and sanitize water and medical supplies. Most survivalists won’t be caught without some kind of firestarting tool – whether it be waterproof matches, lighters, or flints – but in the absence of these tools, make sure you can start a fire without them

Bow drilling is an ancient practice of starting fires that uses the friction between materials to create heat. You’ll need several tools to start a fire with this method, but they can all be found in almost any environment. For an in-depth guide to the bow drill method, check out this resource.

#4: First Aid

The next skill we’ll discuss is first aid. A lot of first aid is pretty intuitive, and chances are you can handle scrapes and bruises without too much trouble. However, other injuries like animal bites, dislocations, breaks and sprains, burns, and allergic reactions often require a little more know-how to manage in the best way.

Make sure that you’re well equipped with a basic first aid kit everywhere you go that includes materials for infection control, splinting, bleeding control, and allergic reaction control. There are tons of guides for how to put together a good kit, so we won’t go into it here, but there’s one more thing we will mention: you don’t need a first aid kit to provide first aid. In situations where medical supplies aren’t available, you can use everything from ski poles to ripped up clothing to manage wounds, breaks, sprains, and insect bites. Consider taking a first responder or wilderness first responder course to learn how to utilize the things around you to take care of injury and illness.

#5: Plant Identification

Our final skill of note is plant identification. Most people don’t realize just how many plants around them are edible and medicinal, and many beginners make the mistake of consuming incorrectly-identified plants that make them sick. Plant identification, while not generally considered a “rugged” skill, is unbelievably useful for providing extra nourishment, treatments for common conditions, and learning to harvest and grow your own garden.

Start learning plant identification with easy-to-recognize vegetation. This category includes berries (like huckleberries, blackberries, and raspberries, which grow across the U.S.), edible flowers (like pansies, nasturtium, dandelions, and violets), and seeds (like pine nuts and sunflower seeds). Then, work your way up to more difficult-to-recognize plants with possible imposters, like wild garlic and onions. Always make sure you’re absolutely sure what you are eating before you eat it – and practice before you actually need to use the skill.

These skills are only a few of the amazing things you can learn to survive when modern comforts aren’t available. Make sure to master them before you need them, and you’ll be safe in the most difficult of situations.

Guest post at The Survival Place BlogTop Skills You Need to Perfect in Order to Survive

About the author:

Mike is a passionate hunter and his favorite grounds are Alaska and British Columbia. He’s also an expert in hunting gear and he is one of the most reliable resources when it comes to choosing the right tools for the job. He also writes for OpitcGearLab.com

man in the wilderness in the winter

By Nick O’LawModern Survival Online

Bushcraft is the art of living in a natural environment, within and in harmony with nature. It is distinct from (though it shares a lot with) survival, where the mindset is only about getting out at the other end as safely as possible. Bushcraft will teach you skills not just to survive, but to thrive in comfort, and rely not on your gear, but yourself. This is a list of the skills you will need.

Finding and Purifying Water

Water is almost certainly the very first thing to worry about when learning bushcraft. The rule of three gives you a maximum of three days without water, which goes down to one in very hot, arid conditions. Remember that even once you have found water, in most cases it will then need at least to be filtered and possibly distilled or boiled before it is safe to drink.

Finding water is often just a matter of understanding your surroundings well, such as knowing that water flows downhill, so valleys and gullies are always a good start. Humans are only animals, and all other animals need water too, so following animal trails or watching for birds flying quickly (they fly slower after drinking, because they are heavier) are also good strategies.

There are many, many different ways to purify water, and there is not space here to do justice to all of them, but suffice it to say that filtering will remove only the larger particles, distilling will get rid of smaller stuff, and boiling will kill bacteria. Sometimes all three may be needed.

Finding Food

There are three ways to find food in the wild: foraging, hunting and trapping. Foraging is by far the easiest to learn, and is likely to produce the most reward.

Continue reading at Modern Survival Online: The Definitive Bushcraft Skills List

A Fully Off-Grid Home For $4,500

By Tricia Drevets – Off The Grid News

If you have been wondering about living a self-sufficient lifestyle in a tiny house, you may want to check out a new video tour of such a home in Eastern North Carolina.

Jeremy Clemons designed and built his cozy $4,500, 160-square-foot home himself, and it is an evolving work in progress. He is working on the door for his stall shower, and he says he is on his fifth revision of the home’s interior set-up, including the placement of his queen bed in the tiny house. Right now, the bed is set up several feet in the air, allowing plenty of room for storage underneath.

Jeremy grows much of his own food in a garden outside his home. He gets power from solar panels and from three marine batteries. A large woodstove dominates the home, and he admits it puts out more heat than he needs. Jeremy says that the foam board insulation in his walls helps the home retain heat and that his inside temperature is often 20 degrees above the outside temperature in the winter without use of the woodstove.

This article first appeared at Off The Grid News: A Fully Off-Grid Home For $4,500

By SurvivoPedia

Most people wrongly believe that it is difficult, if not impossible to hide in plain sight. If you want to avoid detection even when surrounded by other people that may be looking for you, you have to change your way of thinking and learn how to blend into your surroundings.

Once you have mastered how to do this, you can hide in plain sight without family, close friends, or co-workers noticing you.

9 Ways to Make Yourself Invisible With What You Have on Hand

Sometimes individuals have distinctive features that make them stand out in a crowd. It could be a scar, tattoo, or the color of their eyes. The following items can help to make you invisible.

Hats

Use a hat to cover hair styles or colors that are not common where you are. If no one is wearing a hat and you are, take it off or wear a scarf instead rather than take a chance of your hair standing out in the crowd.

Glasses

If you have distinctive colored eyes, wear different colored contacts, sun glasses, or regular clear reading glasses that have fake lens. Once again, the style and design of the glasses should match what is popular in the area so that you do not stand out.

Continue reading at SurvivoPediaSurvival Defense: How To Hide In Plain Sight

TakeOutdoors Infographic on Things to Do When Lost

From our friends over at TakeOutdoors.com , check out the complete article here it’s worth the read: How To Navigate In The Woods – The Traditional Way

About:

TakeOutdoors.com is a website created to make better outdoor experiences for everyone. It is for avid outdoor travelers who want to make the best out of their trip.