prepping supplies

All posts tagged prepping supplies

By Ken Jorgustin – Modern Survival Blog

Sealed batteries, particularly the AGM (Absorbed Glass Mat) battery, is becoming increasingly popular for off-grid applications and have always been preferred in RV or trailer applications due to their safety attributes.

The AGM battery is a lead acid battery, but unlike its traditional counterpart it is sealed tight and offers a number of advantages that more and more users are recognizing.

Sealed batteries with their technology advancements are capable of good performance in many demanding applications from RV battery power to off-grid living.

The technology of sealed batteries (the AGM type is the most popular) has been improving and there are some significant benefits to consider:

Continue reading at Modern Survival Blog: The Advantages Of AGM Sealed Batteries For Your RV Or Off-Grid

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People, Camping, Hiking, Trekking, Forest, Woods

Image Source: Pixabay.com

By Staff Writer – The Survival Place Blog

TV presenters such as Bear Grylls have made surviving in the wilderness cool. Even President Barack Obama spent a few days with Mr. Grylls for a trek across the Alaskan wilderness. Essentially it was a great TV show in which President Obama could chat about climate change, his family and home life while at the same time looking effortlessly cool with a survival expert. Survival skills are worthwhile. You may never find yourself stranded in the middle of a jungle or without water in a desert, but you just might enjoy the thrill of a survival skills weekend. Read on to explore the what every survivalist needs in their backpack.

Safety First

A first aid kit is the most fundamental bit of kit you should be packing. Accidents happen, and while there will be tree sap somewhere in the forest that may help with the gash on your hand, it’s always safer to clean it with an antiseptic wipe and stick on a band-aid. Ensure you have painkillers, band-aids, gauze, antiseptic and bandages as a bare minimum.

Know Where You Are

Gone are the days of navigating by the stars; get yourself a nifty little compass. This tiny feat of engineering can slip into your pocket and can save you from getting stranded. Used in conjunction with a map or ordinance survey record, you will be able to locate key points along your trail or within your environment.

Blend In

If you are keen to take on the true survivalist mentality, then it’s essential that you get yourself some effective camouflage gear. Camo has been around for years, used by armed forces and survivalists across the globe. A more effective range of 3D camo now enables you to blend even more efficiently into your surroundings by using laser cut leaves to break up your outline. If you find yourself hunting animals for food, your camo gear can make or break whether you will be going to sleep having had a satisfying meal.

Tools

It’s vital that you pack tools that have a range of uses. With a swat knife, you can build a shelter and start a fire. Find a swat knife that is durable and locks open and closed to prevent accidents.

In Case Of Emergency

It doesn’t happen very often, but you may need to call for help. As a survivalist wanting to get away from it all, it may pain you to take a phone with you, but you don’t even have to switch it on and can leave it floundering at the bottom of your bag. Just make sure you have one. A cellphone is vital if you are going to ensure your safety at all times.

If you are just starting out learning about survival techniques, think about meeting like minded people on a survival course. You’ll be able to venture into the woods, and with expert tuition, you’ll get to test your newfound skills in a safe and controlled environment. Any wilderness is a daunting place, but treat them with respect, and you can enjoy the challenges they present.

This article was originally published at The Survival Place Blog: Essential Items For The Ultimate Survival Kit

By Daisy Luther – The Organic Prepper

Making your own baby food is easy if you have a blender or food processor, but what if the power is out?

When my daughter recently had complications from oral surgery, letting her feast on nothing but ice cream for 10 days seemed pretty counter-productive to healing. While making her very soft diet for 10 days, the thought crossed my mind that post-collapse, people with dental issues and babies will still need to eat long after the jars of Gerber are gone. (And really, a lot of that jarred food is pricey and isn’t made from the best quality products, which means that making your own is a thrifty and healthful idea regardless of the circumstances.)

But, without our normal kitchen gadgets like stick blenders, food processors, and blenders, what’s the best method to make purees?

Making a puree without kitchen gadgets is only slightly more time-consuming. The only kitchen implements you need are probably things you already have on hand.

  • A potato masher (for longevity, go with a sturdy metal one instead of a cheapo plastic one)
  • A metal strainer (you want the criss-cross mesh and not the kind with perforated circles for best results.) You can get this kind with feet or this kind with a handle. Note how the one with the handle has the little hooks on the opposite side – this will make your life much easier.
  • A large metal spoon

Like I said, you probably have all of these things – the links are for informational purposes so you can envision exactly what I’m talking about. Unless, of course, you have no spoons, strainers, and mashers. Then, by all means, pick them up.

Here’s how to prepare baby food without a food processor or blender.

I used this technique with grains (like pasta, oats, and rice), fruits, and vegetables with great success. You can add broth for a little bit of protein, or, instructions for preparing meat are below.

  1. Cook your ingredients until they are soft. You won’t be able to get the right texture with lightly steamed veggies. Generally, boiling will be the best way to cook the food.
  2. Use your mesh strainer to drain the cooked food, reserving the cooking liquid to add back in for the right consistency.
  3. Depending on the sturdiness of the food, you may need to use your potato masher to prepare the food for straining. Starchier foods like potatoes, carrots, and sweet potatoes, for example, will require mashing first. Once the food has been mashed, return it to the strainer.
  4. Place your strainer over another pot or a large bowl. Using your large metal cooking spoon, press the food through the mesh strainer. The pieces left in the strainer can be used for the adults by adding them to a soup or casserole.
  5. If the puree needs thinning, add some of the cooking liquid back in a tiny bit at a time, stirring constantly to achieve your desired consistency. For a very young infant, you’ll require a much thinner puree. As the child gets older and more able to chew, it can be a bit thicker.

For older babies who are able to eat a wider variety of foods, the family’s dinner can often be processed this way so that they can enjoy the same meal.

How to prepare meat for baby food.

Meat is more difficult to prepare without a food processor but can be done for older babies. If your child is just starting out with solids and you are unable to puree it in a food processor, you may need to delay introducing it for a little while and just add bone broth to their vegetable purees.

  1. A slow-cooked, tender meat will yield the best results.
  2. Once the meat is very tender, cut it into tiny pieces – and by tiny, I mean about the size of a grain of rice.
  3. Place it back into the pot and use your potato masher to tenderize it even more.
  4. Stir in some broth or add a vegetable/grain puree.
  5. Press this through a colander with bigger holes. Strain thoroughly to ensure the pieces are small enough that your baby won’t choke.

There’s also the option of this baby food-making gadget.

The methods above all use simple, easily accessible products that most people already have in their kitchens.

However, if you like gadgets and your kitchen is not overflowing with them, this potato ricer would easily strain the daylights out of some baby food, performing all of the tasks that your three kitchen tools above will.

Preserving baby food by canning

If you want to preserve some food during harvest time for baby to eat later, remember this one important thing:

You should NOT puree food before canning.

Whenever you puree a low acid food and can it, you run the risk of not reaching the appropriate internal temperature throughout the puree to keep the food safe from botulism. Botulism can be deadly for a healthy adult – it would be difficult for an infant to survive a bout of the disease.

If you are putting food back for baby, can the item as is normally directed. For example, potatoes or squash should be diced, green beans should be cut into jar sized pieces – you get the idea. Then, at serving time, use the steps above to process the jarred food for baby. You won’t need to boil it any further to reach the appropriate consistency – just start right in with the straining and the smashing.

To learn how to safely home can fruits, vegetables, and more, check out my book, The Prepper’s Canning Guide.

This article first appeared at The Organic Prepper: The Prepper’s Guide to Making Homemade Baby Food (without a Blender or Food Processor)

About the author:

Daisy is a coffee-swigging, gun-toting, homeschooling blogger who writes about current events, preparedness, frugality, and the pursuit of liberty on her websites, The Organic Prepper and DaisyLuther.com She is the author of 4 books and the co-founder of Preppers University, where she teaches intensive preparedness courses in a live online classroom setting. You can follow her on Facebook, Pinterest, and Twitter,.

By Ken Jorgustin – Modern Survival Blog

Storing an amount of extra water and food to be prepared for 1-week is smart and cheap preparedness insurance for many of the “most likely to happen” disruptions that you may encounter one day.

You may be surprised that the majority of Americans apparently do not have a solid 1-week supply of food at home, and most certainly don’t have a 1-week supply of stored water either.

The assumption is that the faucet will always deliver clean drinking water and the grocery store will always be open and accessible. Unfortunately this normalcy bias has helped keep the notion of preparedness out of the mainstream consciousness.

While having a supply of food and water to last 1-week will not cover all hypothetical disruptions, it will set you off in the right direction to be prepared for many of today’s typical disruptive events within “Prepping and Preparedness 1” and hopefully eventually moving you towards “Prepping and Preparedness 2”.

Here’s what you might consider doing regarding water and food:

Continue reading at Modern Survival Blog: Prepping For 1 Week -Water and Food

Survivopedia_Is_There_Life_After_A_Nuclear_Blast

By Carmela Tyrell – SurvivoPedia

The world is far less stable insofar as mass numbers of people are exposed to the risk of a nuclear event.

While Russia and North Korea have the bulk of people’s attention, every single nuclear reactor and other nuclear locations can be the source of disaster. That’s why it a bomb based nuclear war is a small problem compared to our electric grid being hacked/infiltrated and other situations that can be far more dangerous.

As for the nuclear event, if you survive the initial attack, you’ll face a different world in the aftermath.

But how are you going to survive? Here are 10 questions answered about how life is going to be after a nuclear blast.

Make sure that you can do as well as possible in a medium where the following changes are expected to occur.

Continue reading at SurvivoPedia: Is There Life After A Nuclear Blast?

How To Store Tap Water For Survival

By Theresa Crouse – SurvivoPedia

You turn on the faucet and there it is: as much water as you could possibly want. But then, as a prepper, you think, “What about the day when I turn it on and nothing comes out?”

Many people buy bottled water for their stockpile, and that’s fine, but you can also store tap water for survival and it won’t cost you a dime beyond your monthly water bill, if you have one.

There are some precautions that you need to take, but otherwise, turn on the tap, fill your containers, and store away!

Continue reading at SurvivoPedia: How To Store Tap Water For Survival

By Brady – The Prepper Journal

Once you have a firearm you need to consider what it is going to take to feed your weapon. You can think of it in the way of just getting enough ammo for a particular hunt or recreation, but I suggest you take a good hard look at stockpiling ammo for the just in case scenario. There are some good guidelines and tips on stockpiling ammo that will simplify this process for you and make it easier than it sounds on some forums you may have come across.

Stockpiling Ammunition: Amounts and Types

First we will go over the best amounts and types of ammunition to stockpile. This could be specific to the caliber and gauge of the firearms you so they may be somewhat generalized. The first type is the ultra popular 22LR. It is common and popular for good reason because it is light, effective, and generally cost efficient. The fact that you can generally get larger lots of this ammo for a fraction of the cost makes it an absolute staple in any ammo stockpile. Chances are you already own a 22LR and if you are new to firearms they are great way to get into shooting because of the lack of harsh noise and absence of recoil making it easy to get your fundamentals down. If you are able to master your shooting fundamentals with a gun that uses cheap ammunition you will be way ahead rather than trying to buy a gun to make you better. 22LR is now becoming a little easier to get a hold of in the 500 round lots again so it is a good time to go out and grab some. My recommendation for the amount to keep on hand is 2,000 rounds that you actually keep stockpiled away from your normal shooting stash. In the event you need to hunt for food this gives you a lot of opportunities with minimal space to store it and weight of the cache. This is only 4 cases of the 500 round “bricks” you typically see people buying.

Continue reading at The Prepper Journal: Stockpiling Ammo for SHTF