Pacific Tsunami Warning Center

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Blood Moon - Public Domain

By Michael Snyder – End Of The American Dream

On September 28th, we will witness the last of the four blood moons that fall on Biblical festival dates during 2014 and 2015.  This blood moon will be a “supermoon” and it will be clearly visible from the city of Jerusalem.  According to Google, a supermoon is “the coincidence of a full moon or a new moon with the closest approach the Moon makes to the Earth on its elliptical orbit, resulting in the largest apparent size of the lunar disk as seen from Earth.”  In recent years, there have been some that have suggested that there is a link between supermoons and increased seismic activity on our planet.  But others have written articles that claim to debunk this theory.  Personally, I have read what both sides of the argument have to say, and I do not know which side of the argument is correct.  But what I do know is that seismic activity along the Ring of Fire has picked up dramatically in recent years.  

According to Volcano Discovery, there are 32 volcanoes on or near the Ring of Fire that are erupting right now.  If that sounds like an unusually high number to you, that is because it is an unusually high number.

We have seen earthquake activity increase along the Ring of Fire as well.  Just a few days ago, a massive 8.3-magnitude earthquake hit Chile.  It produced a tsunami that was approximately 16 feet tall, and tsunami advisories were issued as far away as New Zealand

A tsunami advisory was issued for the coastal areas of Southern California, which means strong currents are likely and residents should stay away from the shore.

Los Angeles, Orange and San Diego counties warned residents to stay away from beaches and harbors due to the chances of strong currents. But authorities in the three counties said land inundation is not expected.

“Widespread hazardous tsunami waves are possible” along the coast of Chile and Peru, the Pacific Tsunami Warning Center said, and a tsunami watch is in effect for Hawaii.

A tsunami watch is issued “to alert emergency management officials and the public of an event which may later impact the watch area,” the center says. A warning is issued when a “potential tsunami with significant widespread inundation is imminent or expected.”

Even New Zealand, which is 6,000 miles away from the quake’s epicenter, issued a tsunami warning.

You can see some video footage of the immense damage that the tsunami caused in Chile right here.

Approximately 80 percent of all large earthquakes each year happen along the Ring of Fire, and at some point we are going to see natural disasters occur in this “danger zone” that are going to absolutely shock the entire planet.

Continue reading at End Of The American Dream: The September 28 Blood Supermoon, The Ring Of Fire And The Coming Great Japan Earthquake

About the author:

Michael T. Snyder is a graduate of the University of Florida law school and he worked as an attorney in the heart of Washington D.C. for a number of years.

Today, Michael is best known for his work as the publisher of The Economic Collapse Blog and The American Dream

Read his new book The Beginning of the End

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PLANETARY TREMORS: Powerful Magnitude 7.3 Mega- Earthquake Strikes Coast of Honshu, Japan - Tsunami Warning Issued! UPDATE: Strong 6.2 Aftershock Strikes Japan's East Coast! ~ The CELESTIAL Convergence

Small tsunami hit coastline but no damage reported

AP

A magnitude 7.3 earthquake struck in the Pacific off the crippled Fukushima No. 1 nuclear complex early Saturday, triggering small tsunami but causing no damage.

An official with the Meteorological Agency said that the powerful temblor was an aftershock of the 9.0-magnitude earthquake and tsunami that struck the same area of the seabed on March 11, 2011, killing or leaving missing around 19,000 people and causing three core meltdowns at Fukushima No. 1.

There was no damage and only one minor injury was reported from the quake, which occurred at 2:10 a.m., according to the Fire and Disaster Management Agency of the internal affairs ministry.

Tsunami of up to 40 cm affected four areas along the coast, but a tsunami advisory was lifted less than two hours after the quake.

The epicenter of the temblor was around 290 km off Fukushima Prefecture, and it was felt some 480 km away in Tokyo.

“It was fairly big and rattled quite a bit, but nothing fell to the floor or broke. We’ve had quakes of this magnitude before,” said Satoshi Mizuno, an official with the Fukushima Prefectural Government’s disaster management department. “Luckily, the quake’s center was very far off the coast.”

Tokyo Electric Power Co. reported finding no damage or abnormalities at its destroyed Fukushima No. 1 atomic plant, Mizuno said.

The Meteorological Agency issued a 1-meter tsunami advisory for a long stretch of the northeastern coast. It put the quake’s magnitude at 7.1, while the U.S. Geological Survey estimated it as magnitude 7.3. The U.S. Pacific Tsunami Warning Center did not post any regional alerts.

The agency reported tsunami of 40 cm in the city of Kuji, Iwate prefecture, and in the city of Soma in Fukushima, as well as 30-cm tsunami at Ishinomaki in Miyagi Prefecture and 20-cm tsunami at the city of Ofunato, Iwate Prefecture.

All of Japan’s 50 commercial nuclear reactors remain offline while the government decides whether they meet more stringent requirements enacted after the 2011 quake-tsunami disaster, which triggered the Fukushima meltdowns and the discharge of massive leaks of radioactive materials.

The Fukushima No. 1 plant lies about 250 km northeast of Tokyo.

A string of mishaps this year at the crippled plant has raised international concerns about the ability of Tepco and the government to tackle the continuing crisis.

Nuclear Regulation Authority Chairman Shunichi Tanaka has scheduled a Monday meeting with Tepco President Naomi Hirose to seek solutions to what he says appear to be fundamental problems with the current situation at Fukushima No. 1. – The Japan Times

earthquake35

By Samantha-Rae Tuthill

Around 10:30 UTC Wednesday, a magnitude 6.8 earthquake shook just 40 miles west-southwest of Panguna, Papua New Guinea.

As of 7 a.m. EDT on Thursday, no deaths or damages have been reported.

Quake location courtesy of the United States Geological Survey.

The quake occurred 36.2 miles below the surface. Papua New Guinea sits along the Australia-Pacific plate boundary, which stretches through Indonesia and around Australia. According to the USGS, there have been 22 earthquakes with a magnitude of 7.5 or higher in the region since 1900.

RELATED Panguna Forecast Center Papua New Guinea Satellite US Interactive Radar

The Pacific Tsunami Warning Center does not have any advisories out at this time

More at AccuWeather – Magnitude 6.8 Earthquake Shakes Coast of Papua New Guinea

earthquake35

By Samantha-Rae Tuthill,

Around 10:30 UTC Wednesday, a magnitude 7.1 earthquake shook just 40 miles west-southwest of Panguna, Papua New Guinea.

As of 7 a.m. EDT on Wednesday, no deaths or damages have been reported.

Quake location courtesy of the United States Geological Survey.

The quake occurred 36.2 miles below the surface. Papua New Guinea sits along the Australia-Pacific plate boundary, which stretches through Indonesia and around Australia. According to the USGS, there have been 22 earthquakes with a magnitude of 7.5 or higher in the region since 1900.

RELATED Panguna Forecast Center Papua New Guinea Satellite US Interactive Radar

The Pacific Tsunami Warning Center does not have any advisories out at this time. – AccuWeather

earthquake35

Provinces and regions of the Philippines

Preliminary Earthquake Report
Notice! This is a computer-generated report – this event has not reviewed by a seismologist!

EDIS Number: EQ-20131015-360876-PHL Common Alerting Protocol
Magnitude: 7.2
Mercalli scale: 9
Date-Time [UTC]: 15 October, 2013 at 00:12:35 UTC
Local Date/Time: Tuesday, October 15, 2013 at 00:12 at night at epicenter
Coordinate: 9° 53.400, 124° 12.600
Depth: 30   km (18.64 miles)
Hypocentrum: Shallow depth
Class: Major
Region: Pacific Ocean – West
Country: Philippines
Location: 5.67 km (3.52 miles) SE  of Buenavista, Central Visayas, Philippines
Source: EMSC
Generated Tsunami: Not or no data!
Damage: Not or no data
The potential impact of the earthquake
Well-built buildings suffer considerable damage. Houses that are not bolted down move off their foundations. Some underground pipes are broken. The ground cracks. Reservoirs suffer serious damage.

RSOE EDIS – Preliminary Earthquake Report in Buenavista, Central Visayas, Philippines.

A 7.2-magnitude earthquake struck near Papua New Guinea early Monday morning, local time. No tsunami has been generated.

The epicenter of the earthquake occurred 68 miles east-northeast of Taron, Papua New Guinea, at 4:35 a.m. Monday local time (2:35 p.m. Sunday EDT), according to the U.S. Geological Survey.

The location of the epicenter is under water, but no tsunami was generated. The earthquake occurred at a depth of 235 miles below the earth’s surface, which the Pacific Tsunami Warning Center states is too deep to trigger a tsunami.

That depth has also prevented the resultant shaking from causing damage on the surrounding islands.

AccuWeather.com Senior Meteorologist Jim Andrews explains, “By the time the energy from an earthquake that deep reaches the Earth’s surface, the energy is diffused over a wide area.”

According to the USGS ShakeMap, only light shaking on the nearby islands would have been felt.

The star indicates the epicenter of the earthquake. Image courtesy of the USGS.

AccuWeather – 7.2-Magnitude Earthquake Near Papua New Guinea

April 6, 2013 – A powerful 7.1 magnitude earthquake has hit off eastern Indonesia.  No tsunami warning has been issued, and there were no immediate reports  of damage or injuries.

The U.S. Geological  Survey says the quake shook Papua province Saturday at a depth of 75  kilometers (47 miles).

The Pacific Tsunami  Warning Center in Hawaii said no tsunami had been generated. Residents  ran from their houses in panic, and many remained outside fearing  aftershocks.