Outdoor recreation

All posts tagged Outdoor recreation

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By The Survival Place Blog

The stereotype of preppers is one that very much doesn’t fit the reality a lot of us live in. Many will imagine that we’re loners without families. In reality, a lot of us have kids and spouses who we’re keen to protect as much as ourselves if not more. So, as a prepper with a family, you need to start preparing them, too. It just so happens to be that there are plenty of activities you can get into year round to help with that.

Real camping

An obvious activity to get into is camping. There are plenty of great spots for it. But we’re not talking about the places with running water and electricity within five feet. To really benefit from camping, you need to go as wild as you can. You need to teach your family to create rope from nature, how useful a knife is for first aid and cooking and how to really thrive in the wild.

Traversing those waters

Being near water when out in the wild is important. Being able to move over it is even better. If cars and public transport fail, then water is one of the best ways to travel. Look up the best sit on top kayak and get practicing. It helps a lot that kayaking is one of the most fun ways to spend your time in the water.

Nature hikes

When you’re not camping, considering taking the family to see some of the most beautiful environments that nature has to offer. But don’t just take the sights in. Learn them. Consider using apps to start identifying different plants. There are those with harmful properties as well as helpful ones. Not to mention all kinds of foodstuffs that could be foraged when needed. Make your hikes a much more educational experience. That knowledge of nature is something we’ve been lacking for far too long.

A good fishing trip

As important as nature is, it’s also important we learn how to sustain ourselves from it. Fishing has that obvious benefit. But it’s also a great way to teach your kids some important values. Values like patience and dedication. It also serves as a time to spend one-to-one with your kids. The intimate peace of a fishing trip can be a tremendous force in building lasting bonds.

Winter building

Not every activity is best done in Spring and Summer. Camping is one thing, but it’s not enough in the Winter. Yet Winter can be one of the most magical times to get out in nature. So take your kids somewhere you can all practice building a Winter shelter together. Build yourself a cozy space where you can sit inside with your family and watch the landscape fill up with snow. The kids are guaranteed to love it and you’re guaranteed a skill that could one day be the deciding factor for your survival.

What we consider recreation was once essential for survival. If the world we know changes (as it has before and will again), they might be essential still. Make sure your family is as prepared as you.

This article first appeared at The Survival Place Blog: Family Fun That Doubles As The Preparedness Training You Need

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By The Survival Place Blog

Once you become a parent, you enter a whole new zone. And as much as it’s fun thrilling and happy, sometimes it’s all about survival too!  Kids are notoriously difficult to please. And they might be as good as gold one minute, but they go into serious meltdown mode the next. And don’t we just love them for it! But sometimes it can be exasperating and stressful too. And never is that exasperation more present than when trying to work out where to go on a vacation as a family.

Ever Considered An RV Adventure?

Luxury hotels are wonderful, but sometimes they are best enjoyed as a couple. Especially if you have young kids in tow. Quite frankly they’re not going to care about marble bathrooms and Egyptian cotton sheets. They much prefer outdoor adventure, playgrounds, splashing in the pool and campfires at night. This is why it’s worth considering buying a luxury travel suite so that you can enjoy the flexibility and freedom on offer. Take to the open road whenever you want and have all their creature comforts available inside. Fluffy bunnies, DVD’s, their favorite games and all their books can come with them. And don’t forget emergency supplies of food. And there’s something ever beautiful knowing you’re on the road ready to take on a big adventure. And to survive? It may be bad but take Haribo and potato chips. Use films to keep them occupied. Bargain away with ice lollies and spending money. Remember that the iPad is your new best friend. And pack a couple of bicycles so they can have lots of outdoor fun!

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Family Friendly RV Campsites

So what are some of the best RV resorts when traveling with a family?

Enota RV Campground, Georgia

This place is perfect for kids and adults alike. It’s located in the Chattahoochee National Forest and close to plenty of waterfalls and streams perfect for outdoor swimming. There are fire pits and campfires, and you can really get to enjoy the outdoor scenery with the kids, and maybe even teach them some survival skills of their own!  You can go fishing and hiking, and enjoy the organic farm, where kids can learn all about life in the great outdoors. And bonus, there are three ground trampolines which will wear them out, just in time for you to enjoy a glass of wine by the fire in the evening.

Copper Johns Resort, Arkansas

Want to get your kids back to nature and give them a great big slice of beauty and fresh air? Then head to Copper Johns resort, Arkansas. Here you can spend your days fishing on White River, all having some good quality family fun together. There’s plenty to do here including boating, scuba diving, wakeboarding, and swimming. The focus is all on an outdoor adventure in beautiful surrounds.

Fort Wilderness Resort, Disney

Sometimes, we’ve just got to go with what the kid’s dream of this year why not let their imagination run wild at Disney! The Fort Wilderness Resort recreates the timeless beauty of the American Frontier. There are great entertainment and fantastic swimming pools. And as a survival bonus, it’s close enough to Disney to enjoy all the theme parks on offer. On top of that, there is also archery, horse riding, and waterslides too!

This article first appeared at The Survival Place Blog: Surviving Vacation With The Kids: Family-Friendly RV Camps

By Daisy Luther – The Organic Prepper

It’s summer time! School is out, you may have time off work, and everything just feels a bit more relaxed without the usual hustle and bustle. Now is the time to really give your kids something to write about in the inevitable “What I Did Last Summer” essay when school starts back up.

Bonus! It’s also the perfect time of year to brush up on some of your skills with prepper summer vacation activities.  Not only is it a fun way to pass the time, most of these activities are frugal too.

Here’s a list of the best prepper summer vacation activities!

  1. Go camping. This time of year, you won’t have to worry about getting too cold at night. Put down your devices and go stay somewhere wild and wonderful to camp with your family. Be sure to practice all of the necessary safety precautions at your destination. (This book is a guide to freebie places to camp all across the country.)
  2. Cook outdoors. Go beyond the barbecue and try a sun oven or cooking over a campfire.
  3. Go hiking. Take the family out for an all-day adventure. This is a great time to put on your bug out bags and test them. Are they too heavy? Do you have everything you need in them?
  4. Take a class.  There are lots of weekend classes in the summer. Get certified in First Aid or Wilderness Survival. Learn a new skill like sewing or home preservation.
  5. Grow your own food. Even if you live in the city, you can use a teeny patio or balcony to grow at least some of your own food. This is a skill that could serve you very well one day.
  6. Pick survival-themed beach books. Even if you’re headed to the beach, you don’t have to leave prepping completely behind. Pick up an awesome piece of prepper fiction to enjoy while you’re lying by the water. (I am a huge fan of this series for grown-ups and here’s a list of some of my daughters’ favorite books through their childhoods.)
  7. Send the kids to a summer camp. But not just any summer camp! Pick one in which they’ll be spending lots of time doing outdoor activities, many of which are the precursor to serious survival skills. Some programs to look for are archery, marksmanship, hiking, fishing, outdoor skills, swimming, and cooking.
  8. Go fishing. Hang up your shingle and head out. Fishing is a great skill for preppers. Not only is it incredibly relaxing, you are learning two very valuable skills: acquiring food and cleaning the fish. Bonus points if you cook your catch over an open fire.
  9. Learn to preserve food. If you don’t yet know how to can or dehydrate food, summer is the perfect time to learn, when produce is abundant. Hit the farmer’s market and grab a bushel of something delicious. Then go home and put it up to enjoy throughout the winter. (Here are some tips for water bath canning, pressure canning, and dehydrating.) My kids were always very proud to serve jam that they had made and preserved themselves to guests, and they also loved giving homemade jam as holiday presents.
  10. Go shooting.  If your family enjoys firearms, summer is a great time to brush up on your skills. You can go to a range, or even better, go to a place with simulations so that you can really up your personal defense game. Even paintball can be a fun way to improve your skills.
  11. Hit some secondhand sales. One of our very favorite activities is getting up on a weekend morning and heading out with a thermos of coffee in hand. We go to yard sales, estate sales, flea markets, and thrift stores and come home loaded with treasures for only a few dollars. The stuff you find will often be of very high quality for a fraction of the price of newer, lesser quality goods. As well, if you purchase from an estate sale, you can often find extremely useful things like tools and kitchen devices.
  12. Go foraging. This is a great way to teach kids about edible plants. Grab a good local guidebook with high-quality pictures and head out to the woods with a basket. Then, come home and prepare your finds together in a delicious foraged feast.

Of course, this isn’t a comprehensive list, and all of the caveats apply. (Don’t eat poison stuff, don’t drown in the river, don’t leave food in your tent and get eaten by a bear, and if you do, please don’t blame me for suggesting you go foraging, swimming or camping.)

One of the most important things is to put down the devices, get away from the screens, and go outside. Spend some time in nature and some time away from your normal responsibilities. Really connect with one another and take a break from the demands of our normal lives.

What are some other good, family-friendly activities that build skills while being fun? What are your summer plans?

This article first appeared at The Organic Prepper: The 12 Best Prepper Summer Vacation Activities

About the author:

Daisy Luther is a single mom who lives in a small village in the mountains of Northern California, where she homeschools her youngest daughter and raises veggies, chickens, and a motley assortment of dogs and cats.   She is a best-selling author who has written several books, including The Organic Canner,  The Pantry Primer: A Prepper’s Guide to Whole Food on a Half-Price Budget, and The Prepper’s Water Survival Guide: Harvest, Treat, and Store Your Most Vital Resource.  Daisy is a prolific blogger who has been widely republished throughout alternative media. On her website, The Organic Prepper, Daisy uses her background in alternative journalism to provide a unique perspective on health, self-reliance, personal liberty, and preparedness. You can follow her on Facebook, Pinterest,  and Twitter,.

 

The Survivalist’s Summer Guide To Deterring Ticks

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By Angela Counter Off The Grid News

If you think ticks are just another outdoor nuisance, no more dangerous than a mosquito, think again.

According to the CDC, approximately 30,000 cases of Lyme disease are reported annually. It is caused by bacteria spread by the bite of an infected tick, and can lead to rash, fever, aches, and in serious cases, cardiac arrest and death. Although Lyme disease is most commonly associated with ticks, these tiny creatures are also responsible for the spread of more than 10 other diseases, including Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever.

Even if a tick doesn’t carry disease, its habit of burrowing into the skin can make it difficult to remove, creating an open bite that can become infected. Be practical when moving through brush and woods in summertime, and take precautions to prevent tick bites.

Continue reading at Off The Grid News: The Survivalist’s Summer Guide To Deterring Ticks

appBy Pamela Bofferding – Ready Nutrition

If you have an iPhone, chances are you’ve used a recognition app like Shazam if you’ve ever heard a song you liked and wanted to identify the artist. These recognition apps seem like magic, giving you a definitive answer in just seconds and providing a link to purchase the music you’ve just heard.

Once, while on a hike in the Hudson Valley with a friend, we joked that there should be a Shazam app for nature. At the time we were both living in NYC and we felt a big disconnect from the plants and animals we were seeing around us. Wouldn’t it be great, we thought, to have an app that would tell us which berries were dangerous and what kind of bird has a bright red chest? After doing a little research, it turns out that there are a few apps meant to do exactly this.

  • Bird Song ID is basically Shazam for birdsong. The app allows you to record birds’ singing and then a processor will let you know what species you’re listening to. Like Shazam, the clearer the recording, the better your chances are of getting a match. An added bonus is that don’t need an Internet connection to use this app, so it’s perfect for those remote hikes.
  • Merlin Bird ID is fast and simple to use while birdwatching. You’ll answer 5 quick questions to narrowdown a list of potential species. Millions of recorded observations help the app to make educated guesses.
  • Leafsnap allows you to take a photo of a leaf against a light-colored background and identify the plant or tree from which it came. The catalogue is extensive and it’s a free app—a downside is that you’ll need an Internet connection to use it.
  • IdentiPlant is an app for identifying flowers and plants. Like Leafsnap, this app works by using an image your snapped of the plant and cross-referencing it with a large database. There’s no need to take a photo against a light-colored background for this one, and the app provides extensive information about each plant.
  • Audubon’s Field Guide to North American Mammals can help you identify what animal just darted across your path. You’ll narrow down possibilities by size, shape, location, and habitat and you can even analyze the droppings or tracks the critter left behind.
  • For more advanced nature lovers, the What’s Invasive app lets people track invasive species they might encounter. A list of invasive plants or animals is provided by the National Park Service based on your GPS location. Look through the list before your hike and then keep your eyes open for species that threaten native plants and animals. Report what you see to do your part in keeping indigenous species safe. More advanced nature nerds will love this, plus, if you have small children, this app can give them something to watch out for and therefore hold their interest on longer trails. Also available for Android.

All of these apps are under $5 and most of them are free. Take advantage and download the ones that interest you before your next brush with nature!

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition: Identify Nature With These Cool Apps

 About the author:

Pamela Bofferding is a native Texan who now lives with her husband and sons in New York City. She enjoys hiking, traveling, and playing with her dogs.

 

 

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By The Survival Place Blog

Today, we’re looking at the most hostile and unexplored region on the planet: the ocean. It doesn’t get much more terrifying or dangerous than under the sea. We still know so little about this vast expanse. In fact, we know more about the solar system and space than we do our own oceans. The sea has claimed its fair share of victims who failed to act accordingly underwater. Just like any hostile environment, the ocean demands respect. Whether you’re sailing on top, or diving below.

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In this post, we’ll teach you how to dive correctly, and avoid the most common mistakes. Diving has a mythical aura about it, but it’s certainly not to be taken lightly. It is fascinating and exciting, but it’s also dangerous. Disorientation is commonplace, and it’s not unusual for divers to lose all sense of where they are. Without further ado, here’s how to survive underwater.

Rule #1: Dive with an expert

The underwater diving community has always maintained the ‘buddy rule’. In other words, always dive with a partner. It’s good for maintaining safe practice, and you can keep an eye on each other. Some diving experts have recently relaxed this rule, and expressed the safety benefits of solo diving. However, this is only for divers with years of experience under their weighted belts. If you’re a newbie, always dive with an experienced expert. Follow their lead.

Rule #2: Get the right gear

You would scale a mountain with dodgy, frayed ropes or a discount snow jacket. So don’t dive without top-of-the-range gear and technology. You’re looking for a high-tech dry suit to start with. Buy the very best you can afford if you expect to use it regularly. Invest in the latest oxygen systems and dive monitoring equipment. You do not want your oxygen and nitrogen monitors to fail. Lastly, if you plan on checking out shipwrecks and established dive sites, load up on underwater lift bags. That way, you can bring things back up to the surface.

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Rule #3: Ascend slowly

Any diver’s instinct tells them to head straight for the surface after a long dive. However, this couldn’t be more dangerous. Ascending quickly wreaks havoc with your pressure system, and can cause a lot of damage. Ascend slowly and carefully. The general rule is one foot every two seconds.

Rule #4: Safety stops

A safety stop is a three-four minute rest before your final ascent. You do this at about 15 feet under the surface. The reason for this stop is to ease the decompression process. It gives your body time to release excess nitrogen before going through the biggest pressure change. (Right under the surface).

Rule #5: Equalise

You all know that the pressure changes as you go deeper. This can have a devastating effect on your ears and bodily systems. That’s why you must ‘equalise’ as you go down. The most common method is squeezing your nose, and blowing to ‘pop’ the pressure in your ears.

With these tips, you’re ready to face the ocean. Good luck!

Delivered by The Survival Place Blog

best lightweight tent

By  – The Bug Out Bag Guide

We recently published a great article that provided tips for building shelter in any survival situation, which we highly recommend that you read and familiarize yourself with. However, while learning to build shelter from found materials is a skill we feel everyone should have, there are also many advantages to carrying a tent with you for excursions into the wilderness.

Having a tent saves the effort and time of preparing shelter from scratch – allotting you more energy to expend on other aspects of your camp – and can provide life-saving shelter in cases of extreme weather or ready-made shelter when bugging out at night.

Whether for backpacking, recreation, or bugging out in a disaster, having a tent on-hand can be indispensable. However, especially in disaster scenarios, size matters: the smaller and more lightweight your tent, the better. In the case of your bug-out bag, not only are you looking for gear that is light enough to be carried over long distances, but also that doesn’t take up so much room that other survival essentials are left behind.

What is ‘lightweight’? Generally, for a one-person tent, it can be as light as a few pounds, with anything up to approximately seven pounds still considered lightweight.

Continue reading at The Bug Out Bag Guide: How To Choose The Best Lightweight Tent For Camping, Recreation, and Bugging Out