National Preparedness Month

All posts tagged National Preparedness Month

By Tess Pennington – Ready Nutrition

The devastation of the Texas coast has been sobering, to say the least, and has brought about a new found focus in the preparedness community to get more families prepared for disasters. While Hurricane Harvey was an extreme case, what we can take away from this ordeal is that you cannot always foresee every given turn of a disaster and by being fully insulated from disasters you will find yourself in the best case scenario.

We all live in an area that sees some type of disaster: flood, wildfire, earthquakes, droughts and other extreme weather scenarios. As well, not enough can be said about preparing for personal disasters like job loss, which do not always give warning.

In response to this ever-growing need to prepare, Ready Nutrition is gearing up for a month of preparedness. Each week, we are going to bring you preparedness materials you can use to get prepped for all types of disasters. We’ve done this before in our 52-weeks to preparedness series, but this will cover more information in a shorter amount of time.

As an added incentive, we will be giving away preparedness products and books to Ready Nutrition readers. All you have to do is sign up for our newsletter and leave a comment in one of our weekly National Preparedness articles about what you feel the most important aspect of being prepared is in the bottom of the article. It could be commenting on the most important preparedness items, some lessons you learned personally from a disaster, situations you witnessed during a disaster or preparedness ideas people may not always think of when preparing.

As a community, I hope you will spread the word to folks who might need an added push to start getting ready or who do not know where to start. Having a more prepared community will reduce the initial shock of a disaster.

Here’s what we’ll cover in the Crash Course in Preparedness

Week 1: The Survival Basics – This will cover how you should make a plan and getting your beginning preparedness supplies in order, tips, as well as valuable skills you should learn.

During this first week, we will be giving away a preparedness manual and a 72-hour kit at the end of the week to a lucky winner! All you have to do is sign up for our newsletter and leave a comment.

Week 2: Medicine, Sanitation, and Disaster Disease Prevention – Following a disaster, sanitation, hygiene and medical care are often at the forefront of needs. We will dive into more details on immediate threats that occur in the wake of disasters, what you can do to be ready and how to avoid these aftermath scenarios when they occur. As an incentive, we will give away a sanitation kit and another preparedness manual.

Week 3: Reinforcing Your Survival Plans Using Long-Term Strategies – During this week, we will focus on how you can reinforce your preparedness plans and add additional preps so they extend into longer-term scenarios. Some of those far-reaching events are biological and chemical disasters, mass casualty health, longer-term food needs and more. As well, we will delve into long-term security measures you can use to protect your home and belongings.

To better prepare for these type of events, one winner will get a gas mask as the giveaway prize of the week to add to your preps and The Prepper’s Blueprint!

Week 4: Getting Your Community Prepped – We’ve heard the term, “It takes a village.” Well, when a disaster strikes, it really does take the binding of a community to get through. Disasters are an undeniable part of life, but a prepared community is more resilient and can withstand longer-term scenarios. Having a large group of prepared individuals will help the general public thrive for longer amounts of time because each home has the supplies and skills it needs to keep going. Moreover, communities should provide skills training to help the general public learn critical survival skills for long-term survival. And that is just what we will be discussing in week 4.

A few months ago, I co-hosted a webinar with the folks at SunOven on how to cook with the sun and was amazed at how many uses the SunOven had in an off-grid environment. You can read my review of them here. Our gift on our final week of National Preparedness Month is one of these dynamic SunOvens complete with a homesteading package. Remember all you need to do is sign up for the Ready Nutrition newsletter and leave a helpful comment in the article.

Let’s Do This!

Whether you’re preparing for a short-term disaster or a long-term disaster, you have the same basic goal. That goal is to be self-sufficient and have the ability to care for yourself and your family independently during an unforeseen event.

As an added incentive, if your local church is interested in starting a preparedness course for its congregation, I would like to send a free copy of The Prepper’s Blueprint to them to help get that endeavor going. 1 manual will be sent to each church. I have 20 books that I would like to send so please contact me through my Facebook page with a church address. The first 20 churches get the books!

This information has been made available by Ready NutritionNational Preparedness Month: A Month of Getting Prepped and Giveaways

The Prepper's Blueprint

Tess Pennington is the author of The Prepper’s Blueprint, a comprehensive guide that uses real-life scenarios to help you prepare for any disaster. Because a crisis rarely stops with a triggering event the aftermath can spiral, having the capacity to cripple our normal ways of life. The well-rounded, multi-layered approach outlined in the Blueprint helps you make sense of a wide array of preparedness concepts through easily digestible action items and supply lists.

Tess is also the author of the highly rated Prepper’s Cookbook, which helps you to create a plan for stocking, organizing and maintaining a proper emergency food supply and includes over 300 recipes for nutritious, delicious, life-saving meals. 

Visit her web site at ReadyNutrition.com for an extensive compilation of free information on preparedness, homesteading, and healthy living.

 

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By Katy Galimberti

Marked as National Preparedness Month, September brings the reminder of how pivotal it is to be prepared for extreme weather in order to minimize the impact on families, communities and essential infrastructures.

The National Weather Service is partnered with AccuWeather in order to mold a resilient nation that has the proper information, tools and knowledge to brace for nature’s fury. Known as Weather-Ready Nation, the program strives to hinder the potential damage by encouraging citizens to prepare now for weather that could strike at any moment.

September’s headlining phrase for creating a strong, equipped country is “Be Disaster Aware, Take Action to Prepare.” The simple message can be taken in great stride to protect yourself, your family and your entire community.

The entire effort is based upon four pillars: be informed, make a plan, build a kit and get involved.

The Weather-Ready Nation Ambassador Lead for the NWS Douglas Hilderbrand stressed the instrumental importance of treating preparedness as a “365-days-of-the-year state of mind.”

“We have national preparedness month to shine the spotlight on preparedness, but really it’s every single day that people need to know as they’re making their plans and what risks are out there,” he said.

RELATED:
Building a Weather-Ready Nation: Going Beyond Forecasts and Warnings
Weather-Ready Nation Partnerships Crucial to Extreme Weather Preparation, Response
Weather-Ready Nation: Forecasting Models to Improve This Fall

As the weather is ever-evolving and rapidly changing, Hilderbrand strongly encourages people to remain prepared even when away from the shelter of home. While having a kit is essential, there should be plans in place if danger strikes at a school, an office or even in transit.

Hilderbrand cited the late-January 2014 winter storm that slammed Atlanta and left highways clogged with stranded motorists. The massive number of people stuck on icy, impassable highways could have been avoided by businesses having adequate plans to keep employees home and off dangerous roads, he said.

Weather and climate disasters have been the catalyst for a connected, supportive nation, including events such as Hurricane Katrina. To this day, Hurricane Katrina remains the most expensive billion-dollar disaster in the U.S. since 1980 with over $149 billion lost.

Hurricane Katrina destroyed entire towns and portions of cities along the Gulf Coast in the U.S. late in August of 2005 (Photo/NOAA).

Still, communities need to think of everyday weather events as a way to protect each other as well.

“Serve as an example to your family, neighbors, community. Inspire others to know the risk, take action and promote [preparedness] throughout your social network,” Hilderbrand said.

More at AccuWeather: National Preparedness Month: Tips to Become ‘Ready, Responsive and Resilient’ to Extreme Weather

September is National Preparedness Month - Be Disaster Aware, Take Action to Prepare.

“Be Disaster Aware, Take Action to Prepare”

Ready.gov

During National Preparedness Month we ask you, your family, community and workplace to take action by planning a National PrepareAthon! Day on or around September 30th. We recommend using digital media tools as a way to promote National Preparedness Month, September 1-30th.

What you can do to promote National Preparedness Month:

This first appeared at Ready.gov: 2014 National Preparedness Month (NPM)

Since it is still National Preparedness Month I thought it still appropriate to throw out another list and the Mom Scouts has a great list if you want to be prepared.

 

National Preparedness Month Sign

 

September is National Preparedness month and government and local entities want to know if you are prepared for an emergency. Do you have an e

English: Biloxi, Miss. (Sept. 12, 2005) - U.S....

English: Biloxi, Miss. (Sept. 12, 2005) – U.S. Navy Sailors, Royal Dutch Sailors, and Marines from Mexico, along with the American Red Cross, handout water and food at a Red Cross distribution point in Biloxi, Miss. The Navy’s involvement in the humanitarian assistance operations are being led by the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), in conjunction with the Department of Defense. U.S. Navy photo by Photographer’s Mate 2nd Class Michael B. Watkins (RELEASED) (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

mergency plan? How about an emergency kit (and we aren’t just talking a First Aid kit)? Many Americans still lack having an emergency kit and plan.

Making a Plan

When planning for disasters in your area, what comes to mind? Fire, earthquake, flood, power outages? Knowing the common types of natural disasters in your area will help you in making a plan.  The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) sister site, Ready.gov has a Family Emergency Plan that you can print, fill out, and distribute copies to family members. The Family Emergency Plan is a place to record all important information about your family. For example: birth dates, prescription medications, doctors, addresses, and contact information. Remember, when a disaster occurs your family may not be together. If you have children, it is important to check with your child’s school about their emergency plan. Check with your place of employment for their disaster plan in case you are at work when the disaster occurs.

Building a Kit

Having an emergency kit will provide you and your family with the essential supplies during an emergency. During a disaster you may be without water and/or food. The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) recommends that you have enough supplies to last you and your family at least three days. The American Red Cross recommends that you have enough food and water to last two weeks. More is better in this case, but having enough for three days is a great start. This kit contains food, water, and supplies that you will need as well as items that are specific to your family’s needs.

Water: When a disaster occurs your water supply may be contaminated or you may not have access to water. You will need one gallon, per person, per day. So for a family of five, you would need 15 gallons of water, which would last three days. This includes drinking and sanitation uses. It is important to store water in proper containers and not use empty milk cartons or empty soda bottles. Purchasing water by the gallon is the safest way to store water.

Food: You will need enough non-perishable food items to last each person three days to two weeks. The amount of food will depend on how much each person consumes. To determine what foods you need, think about your basic food groups; fruits, vegetables, protein sources, and grains.  Foods that are canned and dried will keep the longest. Pre-packaged foods like crackers will also keep.

Supplies: You will need to have a first-aid kit, a multi-purpose tool, radio (either battery or hand-crank), extra batteries, cell phone charger, a seven-day supply of any medicine that you take, flashlight, whistle, duct tape, plastic sheeting, manual can opener, blankets, sleeping bags, paper plates, napkins, plastic utensils, resealable plastic bags, and local maps – at the very least. Other items in your kit will depend on your family’s unique needs. If you have a baby you will need to include formula, diapers, bottles, etc. Storing coloring books, board games, stuffed animals, and other comfort items for young children will help them cope with the disaster. If you have pets, having extra food, water, and veterinarian records is important.

The MRC recruits people with medical or health backgrounds to assist during an emergency. Photo by MRC.

Many local organizations will be hosting emergency preparedness events throughout September. For disaster preparedness events in your area contact your local American Red Cross and Public Health Department; they are just some of the organizations that may be hosting disaster preparedness events in your area.

If you would be interested in helping out your community during a disaster, the Citizen Corps is a nation-wide organization. The Citizen Corps was founded as a result of the September 11th terrorism attacks. The Citizen Corps mission is to; “harness the power of every individual through education, training, and volunteer service to make communities safer, stronger, and better prepared to respond to the threats of terrorism, crime, public health issues, and disasters of all kinds.”

An extension of the Citizen Crops is the Medical Reserve Corps. If you have a medical background and would be interested in volunteering during an emergency, contact the Medical Reserve Corps. The Medical Reserve Corps (MRC) enlists volunteers who assist their local community’s health needs during a disaster.

Why Should I be Prepared?

When a disaster occurs, it is uncertain how long it would take emergency personnel to get to you and your family. If it a large-scale disaster, it could be days before someone is able to get to you. For example, on January 26, 2009, Kentucky experienced a winter ice storm that weighted down power lines until they snapped. According to FEMA, over 600,000 Kentuckians went without power for up to ten days. Would you have the supplies to go ten days without power in the winter? This is just one example of how important it is to have a plan, and have a kit.

Always Be Prepared

Preparing for a disaster can seem like a daunting task, but the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reports that people who are prepared deal with disasters more effectively. Being prepared also help reduce fear and anxiety when a disaster occurs.

Author: Janelle Vaesa This article first appeared at decodedscience