Gardening

All posts tagged Gardening

By Ken Jorgustin – Modern Survival Blog

Depending on the growing time to maturity (time to harvest) for a given vegetable you might consider a two week staggered planting delay instead of starting everything all at once.

Why might this be a good idea?

One of our readers recently said this:

 

“I learned that planting an entire garden at one time was a disaster when everything matured at the same time as well. We could not eat it fast enough nor could we preserve it all as required.”

Continue reading at Modern Survival Blog: Vegetable Garden Staggered Planting Every Two Weeks

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By  – The Prepper Journal

Preparedness and self-sufficiency usually turns to food production at some point. Whether we’re old hats or just getting started, there are some set standards that tend to take place in the veggie garden. Sometimes they’re very well deserved. Sometimes, though, changing things up can make a difference in our ability to produce foods. Small scale or large, when it comes to the veggies, doing things differently can buy us the time and space to get started or expand our harvests.

Doing Things Differently

We may not have time for the conventional annual-veggie garden. The big square or rectangle of bare earth set off from the house takes a fair bit of time and water to maintain, even if there’s best management practices in place that return organic matter and keep the soil healthy.

Changing things up can help us save time, especially.

Where we place our veggies alone makes a huge difference for a lot of people. Growing in a bed system is its own article. So is mapping a home, yard, or larger property with a process called zoning. We can automatically make a few changes, however, to bring our veggies to more convenient locations.

Why is convenience entering the conversation?

Continue reading at The Prepper Journal: Start Gardening Differently

By Theresa Crouse – SurvivoPedia

People strive for independence from big government for different reasons. Maybe you’re a “traditional” prepper who is worried about, and preparing for, a future disaster. Until then, you may be perfectly happy living with all of the modern conveniences. On the other hand, you may be seeking to be self-sufficient today and in the future.

Some people do this because they’re concerned about the planet. Others may do it in order to be able to feed themselves without depending on the government or grocery stores. Maybe you’re worried about all of the chemicals used in commercial farming. Or maybe it’s a combination of all of these.

I consider myself to be resilient. The old analogy “watch your pennies and the dollars will take care of themselves” applies here. I’m taking care of myself and my family today in ways that will insure that we will be able to take care of ourselves in the future, even when fragile food systems may fail. Survival is built into everything I do – I just call it being self-sufficient, present, and forward-thinking.

There are many reasons you may want to be self-sufficient, or resilient, but many of the basic tools and knowledge that you need will be the same regardless of your reason. And I’m here to tell you that as long as you have a little space, you can grow enough food to survive.

Continue reading at SurvivoPedia: Are You Making These Steps To Resilience?

10 Vegetables That Just Might Grow Better In Containers

Swiss chard. Image source: Pixabay.com

By Mary Dyer Off The Grid News

Growing vegetables in containers is touted as something you do if you’re an urbanite without space for a “real” garden. People often turn to container gardening when back or knee pain make bending and digging too difficult, or when the soil is so poor that it’s incapable of supporting life.

How about growing vegetables in containers because it’s a rewarding, enjoyable activity? No excuse is required. More and more people are discovering that container gardening is a perfectly viable method for growing vegetable crops.

Container gardening is so popular these days that growers have created dwarf versions of even super-size plants (like watermelons).

In fact, some vegetables actually thrive in smaller accommodations.

Continue reading at Off The Grid News: 10 Vegetables That Just Might Grow Better In Containers

Junk The Water Hose For A Simple $35 DIY Rainwater Irrigation System

Image source: Gardenweb.com

By Joseph Gleason Off The Grid News

One of my favorite summertime passions is gardening. I generally attempt to grow all the needed vegetables I consume over the course of the summer as a way of ensuring I am eating high quality products while also saving a little bit of money.

I already use landscaping fabric to keep the weeds to a minimum, and I employ a variety of other methods to help with water retention in the soil. I am always concerned with maximizing space and effective pest control measures to ensure the crops I am able to harvest are the best I can get.

But one of the hardest things for me – with a busy summer schedule — is keeping track of watering the garden. I do my best to make sure that each plant receives the necessary amount each day if there is no rain, but this isn’t always an option. Just like everyone else, there are days that I just can’t get to it.

Continue reading at Off The Grid News: Junk The Water Hose For A Simple $35 DIY Rainwater Irrigation System

By Daisy Luther – The Organic Prepper

Finally….the week we’ve all been itching for.  At least where I live, it’s planting time! Did you ever wonder exactly how to grow specific vegetables in your garden for the biggest, healthiest harvests?

I’ve spent the past few weeks pouring over my gardening books and scouring the internet to learn all that I can about the specific veggies, fruits, and herbs that I intend to grow. While lots of folks just stick everything in the ground and grow it under the same conditions, (exactly what I’ve been doing) I believe that a little attention toward the specific needs of individual plants can reward you with greater productivity and healthier plants. Below, you can find a round-up of the information I am using to set up my garden this year. I hope some of this is useful to you, as well.

How to Grow Specific Fruits and Vegetables

Asparagus

Basil

Beans (Pole)

Blueberries

Borage

Broccoli

Bush beans (square foot gardening method)

Chamomile

Corn

Garlic

Herbs

Lettuce

Mint

Mushrooms

Onions

Peas

Peppers

Potatoes (Hilling method)

Potatoes (Towers)

Potatoes (Containers)

Rosemary

Stevia

Summer squash

Sweet potatoes

Tomatoes: This is the best tomato-planting advice I’ve seen. I’m trying his method this year.

Turnips

Zucchini

Be sure to also check out the Self-Reliance Manifesto for more than 300 links to other gardening and homesteading tips.

Planting Time Books and Products

These are the books that I referred to when planning this year’s garden.

I’m also a big proponent of Smart Beds. If you don’t have construction skills (ahem – me – cough) they are a great way to make yourself a raised bed on top of any surface. The price is very reasonable too.

Tell me about your garden

Is it planting time where you are? What are you planning to grow this year?  Do you grow plants specifically to certain guidelines or do you grow everything the same way? Please share your very best tips and tell me about your gardens in the comments.

This article first appeared at The Organic Prepper: Learn Exactly How to Grow 25 Vegetable Garden Favorites for Maximum Harvests

About the author:

Daisy Luther lives on a small organic homestead in Northern California.  She is the author of The Organic Canner,  The Pantry Primer: A Prepper’s Guide to Whole Food on a Half-Price Budget, and The Prepper’s Water Survival Guide: Harvest, Treat, and Store Your Most Vital Resource. On her website, The Organic Prepper, Daisy uses her background in alternative journalism to provide a unique perspective on health and preparedness, and offers a path of rational anarchy against a system that will leave us broke, unhealthy, and enslaved if we comply.  Daisy’s articles are widely republished throughout alternative media. You can follow her on Facebook, Pinterest,  and Twitter,.

How to test seeds

By R. Ann Parris – The Prepper Journal

People who are interested in preparedness routinely end up looking further into the future than an event and the aftermath, and eventually end up looking at sustainability and self-sufficiency. Whether we want to augment an affordable beans and rice diet or we want to never need a supermarket again, growing food rears its head. There are lots of factors that go into gardening and crop raising. It starts with the very seeds we plant, so I’d like to look at two of the seed sources we see in the preparedness fold, and how to test seeds to find out if stored seeds are still viable.

How to Procure seeds

Seed kits and especially the long-storage seed vaults can be had good and bad, like any other one-size-fits-all gear or a multi-tool. There are some charts available that tell you how long regular ol’ seeds last, in a fridge or at a constant temperature in a closet. Various vaults and long-storage kits will provide their own estimates.

Continue reading at The Prepper Journal: How to Procure and Test Seeds