Flood

All posts tagged Flood

By Eric Leister

Tropical Depression 32W produced extreme rainfall and deadly flooding across parts of central Vietnam last week.

Rainfall totaled over 500 mm (20 inches) in Hue, while over 425 mm (17 inches) fell in Da Nang.

The National Floods and Storms Control Agency confirmed that 41 people died in the latest round of flooding, while about 80,000 people were forced from there homes.

In this Monday, Nov. 18, 2013 photo, small boats are used to ferry school children and people through floodwaters in Quang Dien District, Thua Thien Hue province in central Vietnam. Several dozen people have died from flooding caused by heavy rains in central Vietnam, with about 80,000 people forced from their homes, disaster officials said Tuesday. (AP Photo/Vietnam News Agency, Quoc Viet)

An official for the Central Steering Committee for Storm and Flood and Control stated that the flooding was made worse by the release of water from 10 hydroelectric plants, according to the Bangkok Post.

Some additional rainfall is expected this week as an onshore flow continues to pull moisture in from the South China Sea, however rainfall amounts will be much lower.

This round of flooding was south of areas that were hardest hit by former Typhoon Haiyan about a week earlier. That storm killed at least 13 people. – AccuWeather

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By Eric Leister

Several days of excessive rains in the Indian state of Gujarat have turned deadly.

At least 13 people have been killed, according to the Associated Press. Earlier reports stated at least 50,000 people had been displaced by the flooding rainfall. Fortunately some of these people have been able to return to their homes as rainfall begins to shift northward.

A slow-moving monsoonal low has led to an extended period of torrential rainfall across the state and locally heavy rainfall will continue to be a concern into Friday before diminishing over the weekend as the low moves northward. The greatest threat for flooding rainfall will be across northern parts of Gujarat during this time.

An Indian motorist tries to balance himself as a bus drives past him on a flooded road after heavy rains in Ahmadabad, India, Wednesday, Sept. 25, 2013. (AP Photo/Ajit Solanki)

One of the hardest-hit areas is around Rajkot, where more than two feet of rain has fallen since Monday. Some rainfall will be possible in this area over the weekend, but a higher risk for rains will return early next week when the monsoon low shifts back southward. The low is expected to weaken before returning next week, but any additional rainfall could result in new flooding problems for the region.

The rainfall led to the closure of many schools and universities while also bringing travel to a standstill due to road closures. Trains in and out of the region were also brought to a halt. Travel by road and rail is slowly being restored across the region.

AccuWeather – 50,000 Displaced in India From Heavy Rains

Prepared? Could your family have survived the Colorado floods?

By P. Henry

As preppers or people who are trying to be more prepared for events in life I imagine that everyone has some of the same thoughts that go through my head whenever I see events like the Colorado floods in the news. I usually go through several emotions based upon whether my family or people I know would be affected, and then I am relieved if we aren’t. Lastly, as the reports of damage and recovery occupy most of the news I begin to wonder if our family could have survived the way millions were forced to do in the Colorado floods.

The ultimate test of all of your preparations is some type of disaster or crisis like this isn’t it? This is the type of thing most of us are preparing for on the surface regardless of other motivations we have. Even if you live far away from any water whatsoever on top of a mountain, natural disasters have a way of impacting people each year. If it isn’t floods, it’s the wildfires recently. If not fire or water, its hurricanes. There are ways Mother Nature has of messing up our lives and you don’t need a grand conspiracy to motivate you to prepare. Just watch the news and you won’t go too long without some scene of horror that causes me at least to think how would I make it through that?

The victims of the Colorado floods are finally starting the long journey toward rebuilding even as storms threaten again. For those who were in the path of this destruction as well as those who might have been safe from the rising waters, this disaster presented two main options we frequently talk about here on the Prepper Journal. How would your preps have stacked up?

Bug Out or Shelter in place?

You have to decide to Bug out before it's too late.

You have to decide to Bug out before it’s too late.

When the news started talking about the floods many people had the same short window of opportunity that so many other have of getting out of the direct path of destruction. This is when they had to make a decision to Bug Out or to Hunker Down and ride out the rain and water. For those people in lower areas or who were closer to rivers and creeks that had already started to rise, they had to make the decision to leave. Those who didn’t or could not became some of the victims.

If you were faced with that same decision, would you be able to pack up and go? Do you have a plan for leaving on short notice like this? Do you have Bug Out bags packed and ready with supplies you know how to use? Do you have a plan should the weather man come on the screen and tell you to evacuate, for you would even go? Do you have an alternate route to get there should the main road out be blocked or inaccessible due to flooding or damage?

I heard a report that Coloradans in that area are prepared for snow and cold, not flooding and I wonder how many may have ignored the signs telling them to evacuate. Being able to physically walk out the door is that first hurdle that you would need to conquer. That entails having a plan and supplies ready to go. The second part would be pulling the trigger on that actual decision and moving before it’s too late. Is this something you have considered if you were in the same situation?

What about the people who didn’t have to evacuate?

For all of the people who were in the path of the water, there were even more who weren’t directly impacted by the flooding but they were impacted by the destruction. Some people were told that even though their homes weren’t flooded, that they needed to evacuate or risk being trapped because the rescue teams wouldn’t come back. The authorities were saying leave now, or you are on your own. Personally I like that option and would take it myself all things being equal. I don’t want to be forced from my home by authorities who say they know better than me. I will take my life and the responsibility for my welfare in my own hands.

Roads may not be repaired for months

Roads may not be repaired for months

Now of course the flip-side of this is if something does happen –  I can’t cry and say I was neglected, but a lot of Coloradans are just like me. They insisted they were perfectly capable of taking care of themselves and stayed put. If this is what you might have done, would you be able to shelter in place with possibly no way of leaving for a week? Assuming that the roads were out, power was knocked out and there wouldn’t be any stores open, could you survive?

Would you have enough water? – It’s been said hundreds of times on this site alone, but the average person needs a gallon of water per day for hydration and hygiene. In a clean-up situation or if the temperatures are warmer, this amount could be double based upon how much you are sweating or working. Do you have enough water for your family for a month if needed? Do you have a way to resupply that water, maybe with rain barrels or a creek? Do you have water filtration methods available to you? This box would need to be checked off before you said yes to staying put. Water is one of the most available things you would need to survive.

Would you have back up power? – Living through any natural disaster like this involves some loss of power. Inevitably, power lines will be down or will be shut off for safety. If power is on, there is no guarantee it will stay on as crews might need to take sections off line to work on areas that can be miles away from you. Having a source of backup power is going to mean the difference between living comfortably or living miserably. A backup generator is usually the preferred method of powering some devices like refrigerators, cell phone chargers, laptops and lights. It isn’t the only option though. A decent sized power inverter you can buy at Wal-Mart and a few containers of properly stored fuel will meet a lot of the same power needs. It will most likely be much quieter and it will absolutely be easier on your back also.

Would you have enough food? – Everybody needs to eat and that is usually the first thing we run to the store for when there is any threat of weather or loss of services. Even if you have a pantry full of food, do you have the means to cook this food if you have no power? Do you have plenty of food that doesn’t require any cooking at all? Do you have food that you and your family will eat? Having hundreds of pounds worth of beans is great but if nobody likes chili for every meal, do you have a plan?

Like I said at the front of this article, this just got me thinking and I believe that’s a good thing. I don’t want to become complacent and hope that if I am faced with a situation like this I will have everything we need and be secure in our preps that we have made. I do wish the people of Colorado all of the best. Our thoughts and prayers are with them. – The Prepper Journal

After flooding devastated parts of Colorado earlier in the week, more rainfall is expected Saturday night and Sunday across areas that don’t need it.

As low pressure departs the Plains and heads into the Great Lakes Saturday night, high pressure building into the Plains from the North will send moisture up the Colorado Rockies once again.

This flow up the mountains will lead to additional rain and isolated thunderstorms through Sunday afternoon, which is not good news for communities from Boulder through Colorado Springs.

Four people have already been killed in Colorado floods and more than 170 people are still unaccounted for according to local authorities.

More rain will develop in the mountains Saturday evening before expanding into the Front Range through the overnight.

While the rainfall isn’t expected to be nearly as heavy as earlier in the week, any additional moderate to heavy rainfall can lead to continued flooding problems with the ground saturated.

AccuWeather.com Meteorologists expect a general 1-2 inches through Monday morning across flood-ravaged communities of Boulder and Lyons in the Foothills with higher amounts possible in the mountains.

RELATED: Colorado Weather Radar Four Dead in Colorado Floods, Evacuations Continue Boulder Weather

Rainfall rates of around an inch per hour which can lead to additional flash flooding, as well as additional rises in area rivers and streams.

Check back with AccuWeather.com over the next few days as we continue to monitor the dangerous flooding in Colorado.

More at AccuWeather – More Rain On the Way For Flood-Ravaged Colorado

By Courtney Spamer

Heavy rain on Wednesday led to significant flooding in the Boulder, Colo., area.

Rain began early in the morning on Wednesday and continued throughout the day, becoming heavy in the evening, dumping as much as 1 inch of rain per hour.

Torrential downpours brought somewhere between 5 and 10 inches of rain across the area. Excess flooding even broke Pinewood Springs Dam, sending rushing water into the city of Lyons.

Already, at least one person has been killed in a collapsed home due to the flooding.

Highway 66 was under water driving into Lyons, and Highway 7 was also shut down.

Roadways were reported as impassable in the city of Boulder’s Office of Emergency Management.

Colorado University‘s Boulder Campus closed for Thursday, Sept. 12 “due to effects of severe flooding and the ongoing weather emergency,” according to the school’s website.

Boulder’s Emergency Management spokeswoman, Gabrielle Boerkircher, told the Associated Press that about 400 students were evacuated.

Water was reported in dormitories and underpasses on campus.

Boulder Valley School District also closed school for Thursday.

Emergency managers also reported multiple home collapses in the Jamestown area. Due to the flooding and mudslides, multiple roads were being cut off.

More at AccuWeather – BREAKING: Major Flooding Kills One in Boulder, Colo.

Special Weather Statement

Special Weather Statement

Now – Thursday, Sep 5, 5:00am

…LOCALLY HEAVY RAINFALL POSSIBLE OVER NORTHWEST OREGON AND SOUTHWEST WASHINGTON THROUGH EARLY FRIDAY…

A DEEP UPPER LEVEL LOW PRESSURE SYSTEM OFFSHORE WILL SLOWLY MOVE THROUGH THE AREA OVER THE NEXT FEW DAYS. EXPECT ANOTHER ROUND OF LOCALIZED OVERNIGHT SHOWERS AND THUNDERSTORMS TONIGHT. MORE WIDESPREAD SHOWER AND THUNDERSTORM ACTIVITY BECOMES POSSIBLE AS THE LOW PRESSURE SYSTEM MOVES INLAND ON THURSDAY.

THE MOST LIKELY PERIOD OF HEAVIER SHOWERS IS FOR THURSDAY AFTERNOON INTO EARLY FRIDAY. THERE IS CONSIDERABLE UNCERTAINTY AS TO WHERE THE HEAVIEST RAIN MAY FALL. AT THIS TIME…IT APPEARS THAT WIDESPREAD RAINFALL AMOUNTS OF 0.25 TO 0.5 INCHES ARE EXPECTED IN THE NORTHWEST OREGON VALLEYS AND FOOTHILLS…WITH LOCALIZED AMOUNTS IN EXCESS OF 1 INCH IN ANY THUNDERSTORMS. UP TO 2 INCHES OR SLIGHTLY MORE COULD OCCUR IN THE SOUTHWEST WASHINGTON CASCADES…1.5 INCHES IN THE OREGON CASCADES. THE LIGHTEST AMOUNTS ARE EXPECTED SOUTH AND WEST OF SALEM.

EXCESSIVE RAINFALL RATES CAN OVERWHELM STORM DRAINAGE IN URBAN AREAS…LEADING TO URBAN FLOODING. THIS CAN ALSO RESULT IN FLOODING OF SMALL STREAMS.

SINCE WEATHER CONDITIONS IN THESE SITUATIONS CAN EVOLVE QUICKLY AND IT IS DIFFICULT TO PINPOINT HEAVIEST RAINFALL AREAS…PEOPLE ACROSS NORTHWEST OREGON AND SOUTHWEST WASHINGTON ARE URGED TO STAY TUNED TO LATEST FORECASTS AND UPDATES.

The combination of Tropical Storm Trami and the seasonal monsoon has unleashed torrential rainfall on parts of the northern Philippines since Sunday.

Rainfall has totaled more than 19 inches in Sangley Point, Philippines, while the capital city of Manila has reported  more than 14 inches of rain causing widespread flooding problems.

Filipino residents push their dog on top of a container across a flooded street in Las Pinas, south of Manila, Philippines, Monday, Aug. 19, 2013. (AP Photo/Aaron Favila)

The flooding was so bad in and around Manila that the financial markets for the country were shut down on Monday. Government offices, schools, universities and many businesses were also forced to close.

As of Monday afternoon, local time, the National Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Council reported three deaths from the heavy rainfall. Several people have been reported missing while at least 11 have been hospitalized with various injuries.

A Filipino man carries his son across a flooded street as they evacuate to higher grounds in Las Pinas, south of Manila, Philippines, on Monday, Aug. 19, 2013. (AP Photo/Aaron Favila)

Nearly 100,000 people have been directly affected by the flooding rainfall thus far. Many roadways remain closed due to the flooding while several flights have been canceled.

Tropical Storm Trami will slowly move to the northwest and then west over the next couple of days resulting in a track near Taiwan. Unfortunately, this track will likely continue enhance monsoonal rainfall across the northwest Philippines, including areas already suffering severe flooding problems.

Additional heavy rainfall will be possible through the middle of the week leading to more flooding problems across the region.

More at AccuWeather – Northern Philippines, Manila Flooded by Tropical Storm Trami