emergency food kits

All posts tagged emergency food kits

Once the prepping bug hits, it is easy to want to go for it.  You know what I mean:  Let’s do it and let’s do it all Right Now!

There are some problems with this.  First there are time constraints and second there is money and budget issues.  But the biggest problem and undoubtedly the one that is overlooked in the initial flurry of readiness preparations, is that without reasonable care and thought given to the process, the tasks and the actual products involved, you can make some costly mistakes.  I say this from experience.  In my haste to get “stocked up” I bought gear that I don’t like and will never use.  I purchased foodstuffs I will never eat.  Jeesh.

Stupid stupid stupid of me.  I should have taken my time, done my research, and made a well thought out and educated decision before I even got started.

Today I would like to help you break down the overwhelming task of emergency preparation by providing  you with a month by month calendar of things to do, tasks to complete and items to purchase.  For the newbies, this gives you a manageable number of things to do in a short period of time.  Instead of looking at a task list 10 pages long, you have a short list that is eminently doable in 30 days or less.

And for the more experienced prepper?  You can start with month #1, look at the activities and tasks involved and fill in any gaps you may have in your own preparation.  In some cases you may see a need to update or rotate what you have on hand and in others, you may find the need to practice a particular skill.

I love lists.  So bear with me as I present a readiness calendar to guide your through twelve months of prepping.  Hopefully you will find that one month’s work is not too costly, not too time-consuming and not too difficult.  The most difficult part as I see it will be getting off your bum and starting.

So let’s do it!

MONTH 1

SUPPLIES & GEAR:

  • Water-3 gallons per person and per pet
  • Hand-operated can opener and bottle opener
  • Canned meat, stew, or pasta meals – 5 per person
  • 2 flashlights with batteries

TASKS:

  • Inventory the disaster supplies you already have on hand, including your camping gear
  • If you fill your own water containers, mark them with the date they were filled
  • Date cans of food and food containers if you have not already done so

MONTH 2

SUPPLIES & GEAR:

  • Canned vegetables – 4 per person
  • Toilet paper – 3 rolls per person
  • Sanitary napkins – 2 months’ supply
  • Instant drinks (coffee, tea, powdered soft drinks)
  • Family sized first aid kit

TASKS:

  • Change the batteries  and test your smoke detectors.  Purchase and install smoke detectors if you don’t have them
  • Make an inventory of home contents for insurance purposes. Take photographs (digital are easiest) of your house and contents. Store a copy away from your home.

MONTH 3

SUPPLIES & GEAR:

  • Canned fruits – 3 cans per person
  • Any foods for special dietary needs (enough for 3 days)
  • A large plastic tub or bin for storage of food and other emergency supplies.

TASKS:

  • Conduct a home fire drill
  • Locate the gas meter and water shutoff points and attach/store a wrench or shutoff tool near them.  Also store special shutoff instruction, if any.
  • Establish and out-of-state contact to call in case of an emergency
  • Identify a location for your storage of plastic bin or tub.

MONTH 4

SUPPLIES & GEAR:

  • Extra baby bottles, formula and diapers if needed
  • Extra pet supplies; food, collar, leash, etc.
  • A stash of at least $100 in small bills – more if  you can afford it
  • Begin to stockpile extra supplies of critical prescription medications. Talk to your pharmacist for help in making this happen.

TASKS:

  • Place a supply of prescription medicine(s) in a storage container and date the medicine(s) if not already indicated on its label
  • Start putting supplies in storage container(s) and include blankets or sleeping bags for each family member

MONTH 5

SUPPLIES & GEAR:

  • Canned, ready-to-eat soup – 4 per person
  • Liquid dish soap
  • Plain liquid bleach
  • Portable am/FM radio with batteries
  • Liquid hand soap and hand sanitizer
  • Disposable hand wipes
  • Disposable latex or nitrile gloves

TASKS:

  • Make two photocopies of important papers and put one in the storage container, and one away from your home.
  • Talk with neighbors about organizing a neighborhood preparedness group.

MONTH 6

SUPPLIES & GEAR:

  • Box of granola or power bars – 1 per person
  • 6 rolls of paper towels
  • Box of N-95 or N-100 face masks – 1 per person.

TASKS:

  • Check to see if stored water has expired and needs to be replaced
  • Put an extra pair of eyeglasses in the supply container
  • Find out about your workplace disaster plans and the disaster plans at your children’s schools

MONTH 7

SUPPLIES & GEAR:

  • NOAA Alert Weather Radio
  • ABC fire extinguisher
  • Jug of juice – 1 per person
  • Adult and children’s vitamins
  • A pair of pliers and/or vise grip
  • 100 feet of rope or paracord

TASKS:

  • Take a first aid/CPR class
  • Show family members where and how to shut off utilities

MONTH 8

SUPPLIES & GEAR:

  • Box of crackers or graham crackers – 1 per person
  • Dry cereal or instant oatmeal – 1 weeks’ worth per person
  • 1 box of large, heavy-duty garbage bags

TASKS:

  • Make a small preparedness kit for your car. Include food, water, blanket, small first aid kit, a list of important phone numbers
  • Secure water heaters to wall studs (if not already done)

MONTH 9

SUPPLIES & GEAR:

  • Extra batteries for flashlights, radio and hearing aids (if needed)
  • Duct tape
  • Add an additional 3 days of water to your supply per person and per pet

TASKS:

  • Follow up on efforts to organize your neighborhood
  • Conduct an earthquake drill at home: stop, drop and hold, then go outside. (Remember, and earthquake can happen anywhere as recent events have demonstrated.)
  • Replace prescription medicines as required by expiration dates

MONTH 10

SUPPLIES & GEAR:

  • Take the month off from purchases. Yay!

TASKS:

  • Secure shelves, cabinets and drawers to prevent them from falling and/or opening during earthquakes
  • Imagine your house with no electricity. What more do you need?

MONTH 11

SUPPLIES & GEAR:

  • Package of paper plates
  • Package of napkins
  • Package of eating utensils
  • Package of paper cups

TASKS:

  • Exchange work, home and emergency contact phone numbers with neighbors for use during an emergency

MONTH 12

SUPPLIES & GEAR:

  • Heavy work gloves
  • Begin to try to expand your food supply to twice of what you have on hand right now. Continue with this effort into coming 12 months.

TASKS:

  • Check to see if your stored food and water needs to be replaced.

MONTH 13

Congratulations.  You have completed your year of preparations.  Now is a good time to go back to month 1 and review, replenish, rotate and drill.  Good job!

The Final Word

Once a month for the next twelve months I will feature an article devoted exclusively to the monthly tasks at hand including suggested activities, recommended purchases, viable alternatives, budget saving strategies and references to more reading material.  Sometime I may deviate from the list a bit and other times I may enhance it.

The final word for today is this:

Emergency preparation is your journey and should be unique to your circumstances, your family, your geographical location and your financial resources.  Yes, it can be a chore.  But as I have said before, it should be a chore with a happy ending.

Author: Gaye Levy http://www.backdoorsurvival.com/

Prepping Resources:

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September is National Preparedness month and government and local entities want to know if you are prepared for an emergency. Do you have an e

English: Biloxi, Miss. (Sept. 12, 2005) - U.S....

English: Biloxi, Miss. (Sept. 12, 2005) – U.S. Navy Sailors, Royal Dutch Sailors, and Marines from Mexico, along with the American Red Cross, handout water and food at a Red Cross distribution point in Biloxi, Miss. The Navy’s involvement in the humanitarian assistance operations are being led by the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), in conjunction with the Department of Defense. U.S. Navy photo by Photographer’s Mate 2nd Class Michael B. Watkins (RELEASED) (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

mergency plan? How about an emergency kit (and we aren’t just talking a First Aid kit)? Many Americans still lack having an emergency kit and plan.

Making a Plan

When planning for disasters in your area, what comes to mind? Fire, earthquake, flood, power outages? Knowing the common types of natural disasters in your area will help you in making a plan.  The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) sister site, Ready.gov has a Family Emergency Plan that you can print, fill out, and distribute copies to family members. The Family Emergency Plan is a place to record all important information about your family. For example: birth dates, prescription medications, doctors, addresses, and contact information. Remember, when a disaster occurs your family may not be together. If you have children, it is important to check with your child’s school about their emergency plan. Check with your place of employment for their disaster plan in case you are at work when the disaster occurs.

Building a Kit

Having an emergency kit will provide you and your family with the essential supplies during an emergency. During a disaster you may be without water and/or food. The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) recommends that you have enough supplies to last you and your family at least three days. The American Red Cross recommends that you have enough food and water to last two weeks. More is better in this case, but having enough for three days is a great start. This kit contains food, water, and supplies that you will need as well as items that are specific to your family’s needs.

Water: When a disaster occurs your water supply may be contaminated or you may not have access to water. You will need one gallon, per person, per day. So for a family of five, you would need 15 gallons of water, which would last three days. This includes drinking and sanitation uses. It is important to store water in proper containers and not use empty milk cartons or empty soda bottles. Purchasing water by the gallon is the safest way to store water.

Food: You will need enough non-perishable food items to last each person three days to two weeks. The amount of food will depend on how much each person consumes. To determine what foods you need, think about your basic food groups; fruits, vegetables, protein sources, and grains.  Foods that are canned and dried will keep the longest. Pre-packaged foods like crackers will also keep.

Supplies: You will need to have a first-aid kit, a multi-purpose tool, radio (either battery or hand-crank), extra batteries, cell phone charger, a seven-day supply of any medicine that you take, flashlight, whistle, duct tape, plastic sheeting, manual can opener, blankets, sleeping bags, paper plates, napkins, plastic utensils, resealable plastic bags, and local maps – at the very least. Other items in your kit will depend on your family’s unique needs. If you have a baby you will need to include formula, diapers, bottles, etc. Storing coloring books, board games, stuffed animals, and other comfort items for young children will help them cope with the disaster. If you have pets, having extra food, water, and veterinarian records is important.

The MRC recruits people with medical or health backgrounds to assist during an emergency. Photo by MRC.

Many local organizations will be hosting emergency preparedness events throughout September. For disaster preparedness events in your area contact your local American Red Cross and Public Health Department; they are just some of the organizations that may be hosting disaster preparedness events in your area.

If you would be interested in helping out your community during a disaster, the Citizen Corps is a nation-wide organization. The Citizen Corps was founded as a result of the September 11th terrorism attacks. The Citizen Corps mission is to; “harness the power of every individual through education, training, and volunteer service to make communities safer, stronger, and better prepared to respond to the threats of terrorism, crime, public health issues, and disasters of all kinds.”

An extension of the Citizen Crops is the Medical Reserve Corps. If you have a medical background and would be interested in volunteering during an emergency, contact the Medical Reserve Corps. The Medical Reserve Corps (MRC) enlists volunteers who assist their local community’s health needs during a disaster.

Why Should I be Prepared?

When a disaster occurs, it is uncertain how long it would take emergency personnel to get to you and your family. If it a large-scale disaster, it could be days before someone is able to get to you. For example, on January 26, 2009, Kentucky experienced a winter ice storm that weighted down power lines until they snapped. According to FEMA, over 600,000 Kentuckians went without power for up to ten days. Would you have the supplies to go ten days without power in the winter? This is just one example of how important it is to have a plan, and have a kit.

Always Be Prepared

Preparing for a disaster can seem like a daunting task, but the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reports that people who are prepared deal with disasters more effectively. Being prepared also help reduce fear and anxiety when a disaster occurs.

Author: Janelle Vaesa This article first appeared at decodedscience

With its remote location and dependence on the uninterrupted flow of supplies from the lower 48 states, the Governor of Alaska has made disaster readiness a hallmark of his administration.

Gov. Sean Parnell worries a major earthquake or volcanic eruption could leave the state’s 720,000 residents stranded and cut off from food and supply lines.

State Seal of Alaska.

State Seal of Alaska. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

His answer: Build giant warehouses full of emergency food and supplies, just in case.

For some in the lower 48, it may seem like an extreme step. But Parnell says this is just Alaska.

“We have a different motivation to do this, because help is a long ways away,” said John Madden, Alaska’s emergency management director.

The state plans two food stockpiles in or near Fairbanks and Anchorage, two cities that also have military bases. Construction on the two storage facilities will begin this fall, and the first food deliveries are targeted for December. The goal is to have enough food to feed 40,000 people for up to a week, including three days of ready-to-eat meals and four days of bulk food that can be prepared and cooked for large groups. To put that number into perspective, Alaska’s largest city, Anchorage, has about 295,000 people, according to the U.S. Census Bureau, and Juneau, its third largest, about 31,000.

It’s not unusual for states that routinely experience hurricanes or other large-scale disasters to have supplies like water, ready-to-eat meals, cots and blankets. But Alaska is interested in stocking food with at least a five-year shelf life that meets the nutrition, health and cultural requirements of the state’s unique demographics.

An estimated 90 percent of commodities entering Alaska are delivered through the Port of Anchorage. Air service is also a critical link to the outside world and generally the only way to reach many rural communities. A volcanic blast emitting a large amount of smoke and ash could disrupt supply lines by air and water for an extended period, Madden said, and an earthquake could knock out airport runways or ports. Those are just some of the disasters that might require emergency supplies.

State officials have been working to encourage individual responsibility, with talks at schools and public gatherings. Emergency management officials plan to have a booth at the Alaska State Fair. A statewide disaster drill is planned for October.

Over the past year, the state has acquired or purchased water purification units and generators designed to work in cold climates, including units that could power facilities like hospitals, Madden said. Officials also are determining what the state needs in terms of emergency medical supplies and shelter, he said.

Source: Business Week

Alaska’s Governor understands the fragility of modern just-in-time supply lines, and rather than leaving his state completely unprepared for a disaster as Louisiana did in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina, he is taking steps to have at least the bare necessities on hand in the event of a worst-case scenario.

Of note is that the State will only be stockpiling about five days worth of food and critical supplies for its population. Definitely a good start, but certainly not enough for any prolonged disaster that may strike their ports or the Continental United States. That’s why they are urging individuals to take it upon themselves to prepare as well.

As we have seen with every major disaster in the world over the last century, when an emergency strikes the government will be overwhelmed. Help will not be on the way – police, medical personnel and local government could potentially disappear in a serious emergency as first responders would go home to be with their families, or simply be out of contact due to downed communication lines.

Like Alaska, every American should prepare for the absence of government assistance and create a well rounded preparedness plan to deal with the aftermath of a disaster, whether natural or man-made.

Author: Mac Slavo  www.SHTFplan.com

Emergency Resources: http://www.thesurvivalplace.com/emergency-food-supplies-c-1024.html?zenid=af7f6e5939e0ce3b2a02df7884766524

Our world is becoming increasingly unstable, and millions of Americans are feverishly preparing for what they consider to be “the end of the world as we know it”.  In fact, it is estimated that there are now approximately 3 million “preppers” in the United States.  But for people that have never done much prepping before, getting started can be both confusing and intimidating.  In fact, I get more questions about prepping than anything else.  People are constantly asking me how they can prepare for the difficult times that are coming.  Well, in this article I have compiled 120 powerful pieces of advice for preppers.  No two situations are exactly the same, and almost every prepper approaches preparation differently, but there are some basic principles that apply to almost everyone.  And without a doubt, a lot of people that are not preparing now are going to regret it in the years ahead.  The global financial system is falling apart, the United States and Europe are absolutely drowning in debt, earthquakes and volcanic eruptions are becoming more frequent, signs of social decay are everywhere and war could erupt in the Middle East at any time.  Actually, it is absolutely amazing that there are so many people out there that still believe that “prepping” is not necessary.

When people ask me what they can do to prepare, there is usually one tip that I give above everything else.  It is not very “sexy”, but it is absolutely foundational.

During the last recession, millions of people lost their jobs, and because a lot of them had no financial cushion, many of them also lost their homes.

For the next couple of years, my number one tip is to build up an emergency fund.  If you are a prepper and you are living month to month, then you are in a very vulnerable position.

What is going to happen to all of your preparations if something goes wrong and you suddenly lose your home to foreclosure?

I recommend that everyone have an emergency fund that will be able to cover all bills and expenses for at least six months.

Yes, cash is continually losing value.  But during any economic downturn it is absolutely essential that you be able to continue to pay your bills.  Having a cash reserve is the smart thing to do.

So what else can people do to start prepping for the tough times that are on the horizon?

In a previous article, I explained that a good place to start is by focusing on the five basics….

1) Food

2) Water

3) Shelter

4) Energy

5) Self-Defense

If you have those five areas totally covered you will be in pretty good shape.

The following are some more things to consider as you are prepping….

*Do not post pictures of money or gold or your preps on Facebook.  If you do, you might get some unwelcome visitors to your home.

*Make sure that your preparations are not against the law.  If you have any doubt about this, make sure that you do not go on national television and tell all of America what you are doing.

*In the event of a major disaster, there will likely be hordes of “non-preppers” running around looking to take away the things that all of the preppers have been storing up.  This is something that you will need to be prepared for.

*The following are 6 excellent privacy tips for preppers that come from an article by an anonymous author that was recently posted on theintelhub.com….

1. Trust no one that you do not personally know. Even the little old lady down the road will rat on you if she is hungry when the SHTF.

2. Keep your prepping to yourself. Again, do not tell anyone you are prepping. If they know you have stores of food, where do you think they will think of first when the SHTF? Oh and don’t forget, the Department of Homeland Security thinks people with stockpiles of food and weapons as potential domestic terrorist.

3. Don’t share any prepping articles on Facebook or other social media. Don’t draw attention to yourself by posting prepping articles or discussing the topic on the website. You may think you are educating your friends, but in reality you are just letting them know of your actions and plans.

4. Make sure boxes are not labeled with the company name if your order emergency supplies. Most companies will publish this in their ordering information. You don’t want to tip-off the UPS driver that you just received a year’s worth of freeze-dried food.

5. Do not tell anyone what you are up to. You don’t know how hard it is for me not to tell people I meet that I was almost on the National Geographic TV show. That would be a disaster.

6. Be alert to what others are saying. I was sitting in my dental hygienist chair a week ago and she told me about another customer that was storing food. She thought he might be prepping and she said if it ever got bad, she knew where to find some food. I just acknowledged the statement and let it rest.

*In one article that I did about preparation, I listed 10 things that you can start doing right now to get yourself into a better position for the chaos that is coming….

1 – Get Out Of Debt

2 – Find New Sources Of Income

3 – Reduce Your Expenses

4 – Learn To Grow Your Own Food

5 – Make Sure You Have A Reliable Water Supply

6 – Buy Land

7 – Get Off The Grid

8 – Store Non-Perishable Supplies

9 – Develop Stronger Relationships

10 – Get Educated And Stay Flexible

*Would moving to another area of the country be the best choice for you and your family?  In an article entitled “What Is The Best Place To Live In The United States To Prepare For The Coming Economic Collapse?” I detailed some of the pros and cons for living in various areas of the country.

*In a recent article posted on shtfplan.com, Norse Prepper shared 11 questions that all preppers should be asking themselves….

1. What am I preparing for?

2. Am I going to bug in or bug out?

3. Can I defend my family, property and preps?

4. Do I have enough to feed my family until order is restored?

5. How will I heat my home?

6. How will I keep clean?

7. How will I provide light and electricity?

8. How will I keep up on information and communicate with the outside world?

9. What do I have to offer others?

10. How will I fight off boredom?

11. How do I pay for all of this?

You can read the entire article right here.

*In the years ahead food might cost a whole lot more than it does right now.  Your food dollars are never going to go farther than they do right now.

*Many people do not realize this, but you can grow herbs that have tremendous healing properties in your own garden.

*In a recent article, I detailed some of the things that you will want to consider in the event of a major economic collapse….

#1 Food Shortages Can Actually Happen

#2 Medicine Is One Of The First Things That Becomes Scarce During An Economic Collapse

#3 When An Economy Collapses, So Might The Power Grid

#4 During An Economic Collapse You Cannot Even Take Water For Granted

#5 During An Economic Crisis Your Credit Cards And Debit Cards May Stop Working

#6 Crime, Rioting And Looting Become Commonplace During An Economic Collapse

#7 During A Financial Meltdown Many Average Citizens Will Start Bartering

#8 Suicides Spike During An Economic Collapse

#9 Your Currency May Rapidly Lose Value During An Economic Crisis

#10 When Things Hit The Fan The Government Will Not Save You

*You need to have a plan for what you will do if a massive wildfire comes sweeping through your area.  This is especially true if you live in the western half of the United States.

*In a previous article entitled “20 Things You Will Need To Survive When The Economy Collapses And The Next Great Depression Begins”, I made a list of 20 things that you will need when you are not able to rely on Wal-Mart or the grocery store any longer….

#1) Storable Food

#2) Clean Water

#3) Shelter

#4) Warm Clothing

#5) An Axe

#6) Lighters Or Matches

#7) Hiking Boots Or Comfortable Shoes

#8) A Flashlight And/Or Lantern

#9) A Radio

#10) Communication Equipment

#11) A Swiss Army Knife

#12) Personal Hygiene Items

#13) A First Aid Kit And Other Medical Supplies

#14) Extra Gasoline (But Be Very Careful How You Store It)

#15) A Sewing Kit

#16) Self-Defense Equipment

#17) A Compass

#18) A Hiking Backpack

#19) A Community

#20) A Backup Plan

*In the comments following that article, my readers suggested a number of additional items to add to that list….

1. A K-Bar Fighting Knife

2. Salt

3. Extra Batteries

4. Medicine

5. A Camp Stove

6. Propane

7. Pet Food

8. Heirloom Seeds

9. Tools

10. An LED Headlamp

11. Candles

12. Clorox

13. Calcium Hypochlorite

14. Ziplock Bags

15. Maps Of Your Area

16. Binocular

17. Sleeping Bags

18. Rifle For Hunting

19. Extra Socks

20. Gloves

21. Gold And Silver Coins For Bartering

*There are more preppers out there than you might think.  Don’t be afraid to reach out and make new friends.

*In a recent article, Brandon Smith shared some of the factors to consider when choosing a location for a survival retreat….

1. Property Placement

2. Community Network

3. Defensibility

4. Water Availability

5. Food Production

6. Proximity To National Forest

7. Secondary Retreat Locations

You can read the rest of that article right here.

*Almost everyone can grow a survival garden.  Even if you only have an apartment, you can still grow a few things on your balcony.

*Don’t underestimate the impact a major transportation disruption could have on our daily lives.

*You would be surprised what you can actually do with limited resources.  For example, there is one family that is actually producing 6000 pounds of produce a year on just 1/10th of an acre right in the middle of Pasadena, California.

*Survival Mom once shared the top ten survival tips that nobody wants to talk about….

1. Duct taping your windows will not save you from radiation poisoning.

2. You may have to dig a latrine (more than one time).

3. You may not receive any government benefits or payment from your place of employment during a disaster.

4. It is possible that you may be sick or in the hospital during a disaster.

5. Your pets may not survive.

6. It is likely that your cell phone will not work.

7. No one is coming to help you.

8. Insurance doesn’t cover everything, if there is an insurance company left.

9. There will not be enough food and water for everyone.

10. If it is the end of the world, the previous nine tips will not matter!!!

*An EMP burst caused by a high altitude nuke or by a major solar event could fry most of your electronics.  What are you going to do if that happens?

*Spending a million dollars on a “survival condo” in an abandoned missile silo in Kansas is probably not a very efficient use of your limited resources.

*Off Grid Survival recently posted a list of four powerful traits that most survivors have in common….

1. Survivors stay Calm in the face of Danger

2. Survivalists are Experts at Improvisation

3. Survivors are D.I.Y Experts

4. Survivors are Great Leaders

*You can always learn more.  Organizations such as The American Preppers Network enable preppers to network and learn from one another.

*During the difficult times that are coming, in addition to physical preparation it is going to be absolutely crucial to be both mentally and spiritually tough.

Many have accused me of being a “doom and gloomer”, but I don’t see anything negative about being prepared.

In fact, having a plan can give you a tremendous amount of hope.  There will be a lot of people out there that will be tremendously blessed in the midst of the chaos that is coming.  Victory often goes to those who are most prepared.

But if you choose simply to have blind faith in the system and you choose to stick your head in the sand, you might find that “ignorance is bliss” for a little while but when the stuff hits the fan it is going to be incredibly painful for you.

Previous generations understood that it was wise to store up supplies in the good years in order to make things easier in the lean years.

Unfortunately, most people these days have never been through truly hard times so they have no idea what they are like.

Just because the world has enjoyed a tremendous amount of prosperity for the last several decades does not mean that things will always be this way.

Wake up, take a look at the storm on the horizon and get prepared while you still can.

If you choose not to prepare now, you will regret it later.

Aurthor: By Michael

Source: http://endoftheamericandream.com/archives/120-powerful-pieces-of-advice-for-preppers

What do you do if you find yourself in the middle of an earthquake, and chances are that at some point in your life this is a real possibility? There are all sorts of potential dangers that you will have to face so it’s a good idea to think about what those will be and how you can survive.

If you find yourself indoors in an earthquake DROP, COVER AND HOLD ON. If you are not near a strong table or desk, drop to the floor against an interior wall and cover your head and neck with your arms. Ideally you want to have a strong desk or table to use as cover, this will help protect you from falling debris and hopefully is able to withstand any of the falling structure around you. These types of furniture will give you that small area of survivability if anything falls from above. If you’ve ever seen pictures of homes or offices after an earthquake you might have noticed when the walls fall in a lot of times there are small tri-angle shaped areas where the structure that has fallen in and is being supported by tables, desks and other pieces of furniture. These areas give you the best chance of survival and getting through the earthquake. Even if you become trapped you’re still alive and that’s what’s important. Do not use a doorway except if you know it is a strongly supported, load-bearing doorway and it is close to you. Many inside doorways are lightly constructed and do not offer protection.

You want to avoid being around windows, hanging objects, mirrors, tall furniture or other large appliances and cabinets filled with heavy objects if at all possible. Do not try to run out of the structure during strong shaking, it’s almost impossible to avoid not being hit by one of these types of items and your balance won’t be all that good due to the floor moving around and you have a good chance of falling and hurting yourself.  If you are in bed roll out on to the floor laying flat towards an inside wall, that way you won’t be crushed by falling debris and it gives you that tri-angle space we talked about earlier, the bed should support some structure. Due not go under the bed, you will be crushed. Many experts say to stay in bed and cover your head with a pillow but I disagree with this, I believe you have a better chance on the floor, but you can decide what’s best for you.

If after the earthquake you find yourself trapped in debris try to move as little as possible so that you don’t kick up a lot of dust. Cover your nose and mouth with a handkerchief or other piece of clothing to avoid breathing in any potential harmful dust. Stay put and only try to escape if there is a clear visible path out, trying to move any kind of debris or structure around you can cause it to fall in on top of you resulting in further injury or death. If trapped you can tap on a pipe or wall so that rescuers can hear where you are. Avoid shouting; this can cause you to inhale dangerous amounts of dust. Do not light a match to avoid causing an explosion, gas and some dust is flammable.

If you find yourself outdoors when the shaking starts move to a clear area if you can safely walk there. Be on the lookout to avoid power lines, buildings and trees or any other things above you that may fall on top of you. If you are in a large metropolitan area or any other downtown type scenario, it is safer to remain inside a building during and after an earthquake unless there is a fire or gas leak. There are no open areas in downtown type scenarios far enough from glass or other falling debris to be considered safe refuge sites. Glass and other building materials from high-rise buildings do not always fall straight down; it can be caught up in a wind current and travel great distances. Any debris falling from any skyscraper no matter the size of that debris can potentially be lethal.

If you’re driving stop as quickly as safety permits and stay in the vehicle, avoid stopping near or under buildings, trees, overpasses, and utility wires. Once the earthquake has stopped avoid roads, bridges, or ramps that might have been damaged by the earthquake. There will most likely be damage to these types of structures so you will need to proceed with caution and the possibilities of downed power line are all likely.

If you are on the beach, move to higher ground immediately, do not wait! An earthquake can cause a tsunami and you may have limited time to move to higher ground. I’m sure most everybody has this still fresh in their mind after seeing what happened after the earthquake in Japan.

Once the earthquake has stopped check the people around you for injuries; provide first aid if qualified to do so. Do not move seriously injured persons unless they are in immediate danger. Check around you for dangerous conditions, such as downed power lines, fires, and structure damage. If you have a fire extinguisher and are trained to use it then put out small fires immediately. Chances are there can be damaged gas lines and any fire is potentially dangerous with any leaking gas. Fires are one of the most devastating and common hazards after an earthquake. Inspect your home for damage and turn off the gas only if you smell gas. Also be prepared for aftershocks so avoid going back into heavily damaged buildings.

Stay away from damaged areas unless your assistance has been specifically requested by police, fire, or other relief organizations. Return home only when authorities say it is safe to do so. After it has been determined that its’ safe to return to your home, your safety should be your primary concern as you begin clean up and recovery.

Hopefully this gives you some ideas and areas to think about before such an event. Only with proper planning and preparedness will you be able to survive a major earthquake, so go get prepared.

Author: The Survival Guy

Source: https://thesurvivalplaceblog.com

Power outages can occur at any time of the year and it may take from a few hours to several days for electricity to be restored to residential areas. Without electricity or a cold source, food stored in refrigerators and freezers can become unsafe. Bacteria in food grow rapidly at temperatures between 40 and 140 °F, and if these foods are consumed, people can become very sick.

Flood, fire, national disaster or the loss of power from high winds, snow or ice could jeopardize the safety of your food. Knowing what to do before and after an emergency can help you reduce your risk of illness and minimize the amount of food that may be lost due to spoilage.

Following a disaster, there may be power outages that could last for several days. Stock canned foods, dry mixes and other staples that do not require refrigeration, cooking, water or special preparation. Be sure to include a manual can opener and eating utensils. There are also lots of Emergency Food Storage Kits on the market that make a great addition to anyones list of preparedness items.

Consider the following things when putting together your emergency food supplies:

  1. Store at least a three-day supply of non-perishable food.
  2. Choose foods your family will eat.
  3. Remember any special dietary needs.
  4. Avoid foods that will make you thirsty.
  5. Choose salt-free crackers, whole grain cereals and canned foods with high liquid content.

The following items are suggested when selecting emergency food supplies. You may already have many of these on hand.

  • Ready-to-eat canned meats, fruits, vegetables and a can opener
  • Protein or fruit bars
  • Dry cereal or granola
  • Peanut butter
  • Dried fruit
  • Nuts
  • Crackers
  • Canned juices
  • Non-perishable pasteurized milk
  • High energy foods
  • Vitamins
  • Food for infants
  • Comfort/stress foods

Author: The Survival Guy

Source: https://thesurvivalplaceblog.com