About EMPs

All posts tagged About EMPs

survivopedia-study-guide-for-emp-survival

By  – SurvivoPedia

EMP is an important hazard to prepare for. It has the potential to disrupt critical infrastructure we depend on to sustain life, causing cascading effects of long duration over great areas.

EMP is not the only emergency that mankind should prepare for, but it is one of a handful of hazards that virtually everyone is enormously exposed to.

There is so much to do, and so little time. It’s easy to see why some of our readers ask themselves where to start from.

Continue reading at SurvivoPedia: The Basic Study Guide For Your EMP Survival

Advertisements

solar stormBy Jeremiah Johnson – Ready Nutrition

ReadyNutrition Guys and Gals, we’re going to be covering some basic information on solar storms, as it has been a much-ignored topic as of late.  The important thing to realize is that we have long been overdue for a sizable solar storm to hit the earth and affect it negatively. With scientists announcing that the solar cycle reached its peak in 2013, the subject drifted by the wayside and the public treat it as if it no longer a threat.  This stance, as we know, is not the way of the survivor: be prepared at all times, regardless of the type of emergency.  Mark my words, the single most important thing you need to understand is that a solar storm will happen again and we need to be ready for it. Now is the time to understand this natural phenomenon and its impact on our daily lives.

EMPs and Solar Storms

You can kill two birds with one stone and be ready for solar storms by preparing for an EMP, thus shielding sensitive equipment and the like and protecting it all from both events.  The big event associated with the sun that we must be aware of is the Coronal Mass Ejection, or CME.  These CME’s are huge heated plasma eruptions from the sun that are highly magnetic in nature, “vomited” into space by the sun.  These flares are no light, laughing matter: the “vomitus” is equivalent to hundreds of millions of megatons being detonated…picture a 1 megaton nuclear warhead…multiplied 200 million times!

Gamma rays and X-rays are sent forth, and in addition charged particles are accelerated to almost reach the speed of light.  The problems arise when all of this “confetti” reaches the earth…and affects the earth’s ionosphere and its magnetic field.  Most communications can be brought to a standstill and GPS becomes next to worthless.  These storms can also destroy satellites orbiting the earth and render them “dead” in terms of use.

Power Grids Will Cease

The power grids (almost all of them) have no protection from such an onslaught.  Catastrophic damage can be rendered to the transformers with an overload, causing overheating and even explosions to those without the proper shielding.  In the fairly recent past, the U.S. experienced the Carrington Storm of 1859 that gave rise to the name of a CME-precipitated storm as a Carrington Event.  If such a storm occurred today, the entire grid system of the U.S. would be wiped out. In fact, in recent years, a U.S. Congressman urged protection for power grids stating that an EMP attack “could bring our civilization to a cold, dark halt.”

In October of 2011, the NOAA instituted a program named Enlil that can give at least 6 hours of warning before a solar storm hits the earth.  In addition, SOHO (the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory) has 6 detectors that measure everything from solar winds to movements and oscillations on the surface of the sun.  These early warning devices are mostly managed by NOAA’s Space Weather Prediction Center in Boulder, Colorado.

The Carrington Event-class super-solar storm occurs usually only once every century or so.  Back in the 1859 storm, people saw the aurora’s of earth’s atmosphere so charged up that they thought the land was on fire and that cities were burning.  Power and telegraph lines were completely knocked out of commission.  More recently, in March 13 of 1989 the Quebec, Canada blackout occurred where 6 million people lost power in less than two minutes.  That storm was not even 1/3 as powerful as the 1859 Carrington storm.

The Time To Prepare for Solar Storms and EMPs Was Yesterday

Faraday cages and grounding rods for large room-sized cages are the way to go with protecting electronic equipment.  Should you have it protected for the likelihood of an EMP (Electromagnetic Pulse), it will be more than sufficient to shield the equipment from a solar flare or Carrington Event.  The time to prepare is yesterday!  There are many books and resources that will help you to be able to shield the electronic devices you wish to save.  Solar storms are no joking matter; however, with the proper precautions you can protect against them as you protect your home, family, and supplies with any other disaster, be it natural or man-made.  Understanding them is the key, and I encourage you to research the topic continually, as new information always comes to light with time.  Have a great day, and keep up the fight!

JJ

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition: The Single Most Important Thing You Need To Know About Solar Storms

 About the author:

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

 

solar_pannel

By

Our country’s way of life and most people aren’t prepared to survive when an EMP will cripple the entire U.S. power grid and kill electric equipment in the entire country. Protecting your solar gear makes the big step ahead to your survival.

You might choose to start with an easy, inexpensive project right now such as constructing a DIY Faraday cage for your solar panels, or tuck a few mission-critical solar gadgets inside a couple of layers of Faraday bags to go in your rucksack. We already explained how to do it, in the first part of this article.

Next in increasing order of cost, complexity and difficulty, are solar panel installations on homes or retreats which are not connected to the grid. For this type of application we will shield the solar panels themselves, all associated wiring, inverter hardware, the battery bank and as little space as a couple of rooms or as much as the entire building.

How It Works

Shielding large spaces is most easily and least expensively accomplished in the design and building phases of the home and its solar power system as opposed to retrofitting an existing home and installing solar panels on it.

By creating a larger envelope of shielding, with the same shielding properties as a Faraday cage, all of the electronic devices in the shielded portion of the building will be protected. Shielding large spaces eliminates redundant purchases and the hassle of storing spare electronics in a Faraday cage for possible future use. Also, you don’t ned to shield dozens of devices individually nor install surge protection and shielded wiring between them.

To shield against the maximum theoretical EMP field strength (50 thousand volts per meter) of known NHEMP detonations, we must shield our solar panels to 74dB over a frequency range below 64Mhz.

But shielding them to 80Mhz will give us a margin of error since our shielding will likely become somewhat compromised over time and by the wear and tear of life and the elements.

Shielding Solar Panels for an Off-Grid Retreat

bergethon-solar-panelTo shield our grid-independent retreat, the entire outer skin of the structure must be shielded to our target 80dB.

The entire roof, the exterior of all of the walls and the floor must all be shielded.

This will obviously be much easier to accomplish during the design and construction phases and can be accomplished by choosing conductive construction materials and methods which provide the needed shielding and lack of impedance, such as:

  • Conductive metal roofing materials
  • Conductive paint
  • Conductive metal doors, door frames and conductive gaskets
  • Conductive matting laid over the foundation or skin applied to the bottom of the sub-floor
  • Conductive bonds, joints, brackets, gaskets and seals must be used to joint different materials
  • Conductive window frames must be used
  • Conductive window film or 2 layers of 20 opening per inch wire screening covering windows but still allowing light to pass through them and an unobstructed view will still providing the requisite level of shielding,
  • 2 layers of conductive 20 opening per inch wire screening covering the solar panels will allow light transmission to the panels while still providing the requisite shielding. 2 layers will protect against construction mistakes and wear.

The outside skin of all walls must be shielded or the wiring within the walls will conduct the EMP into the electrical system. If less than the entire structure is shielded, the shielded rooms must be wired independently of the rest of the house or the use of costly fast-clamping surge protection equipment will be necessary to isolate the shielded rooms.

The building should be properly grounded because of its large area.

 

Install micro-inverters underneath the shielded skin that envelops each solar panel instead of a single, and large inverter cabinet that rests on a cement pad next to the structure. You will increase redundancy and avoid shielding the inverter cabinets, and installing surge suppression and shielded wiring.

Shielding Solar Panels for a Grid-Connected Location

The most difficult and expensive solar installation is the protection of is a grid-connected home or building.

The same principles apply to this project as applied to the simpler projects but since the home and its solar energy system is connected to the power grid, this one requires additional protective measures.

This installation will be more vulnerable to the power charges induced by E3 because it is grid connected. For that reason, in addition to the measures taken in the previous projects, keep take good care of the following:

  • The home’s connection to the power grid should have a mechanical, manual bypass circuit allowing the home to be physically disconnected from the grid.
  • The home’s connection to the power grid must be fitted with the fast-clamping surge suppression previously mentioned.
  • In order to deal with the power company, the home will need an electric meter. If a smart meter with a data connection is installed, the data connection would also need to be surge protected.
  • Being more along the lines of a remote cabin, the last model was assumed to be pretty self-contained. Grid-connected homes typically have more connections penetrating the shielded envelope in addition to power such as copper phone lines, cable TV, satellite TV, radio antennas, etc.. An external cellular antenna will be necessary. A cell signal repeater located inside the shielded home will also be needed since virtually no signals of any kind will penetrate the home’s shielding.
  • Non-conductive water and sewer pipes should be used where they penetrate the shielding envelope. EMP trapping baffles could be constructed where non-conductive pipe penetrations occur to reduce the amount of EMP entering through these points.
  • Fiber optic cabling can be substituted for copper data and voice cable runs since fiber optic cable is non-conductive and will not conduct surges caused by E3 EMP inside the shielding envelope.
  • Shielded foyers, mud rooms or rotating doors should be installed at entrances and exits. Passing through 2 shielded doors to enter the building, but allowing only 1 door to open at any given time will maintain the envelope. It would be a shame to go to all the cost and trouble of this level of protection just to have an EMP occur when the door is open and compromise the contents of the structure.

This last type of installation will raise the cost of a new home by about 30% including the cost of adding a solar installation with a battery bank and backup generator. But the added cost would be recouped over time through savings on future electrical bills and it is hard to put a price tag on piece of mind and the ability to maintain your standard of living after an EMP.

Of course, costs would increase for a retrofit in proportion to the complexity of the build and the amount of material needed.

With a little knowledge, insight and preparation, you can protect your solar panels from the effects of EMP. Whatever your income and the level of complexity of your solar installation, there is a solution.

Take this knowledge to prepare yourself or your family now so that you and yours are less vulnerable in the event of an EMP.

Find out which devices are vulnerable to EMP on “How to Survive an EMP”. 

This article first appeared at Survivopedia: How to Protect Your Solar Gear from EMP (Part 2)

BIG_solarEMP

By

Imagine not having any electricity for days, weeks, months or even years… no lights, no communication channels, no water, no refrigeration, no navigation systems, no gas pumping, no food transportation, no waste pumping or garbage collecting. This is the potentially cataclysmic threat that EMP poses, and the reason to plan your survival.

Understanding the probability of an EMP of sufficient field strength, during your lifetime, is sufficient to warrant action on your part to protect your devices and solar panels from it.

Which One Is Worse for My Panels?

There are differences in effect and magnitude between nuclear high-altitude EMP (NHEMP, or EMP caused by a nuclear weapon detonated high above the earth), geomagnetically induced EMP (GIEMP or EMP caused by solar weather), and nuclear low-altitude EMP (NLEMP or EMP from a nuclear weapon detonated near the ground). You have to know them in order to protect properly against their different effects.

NHEMP occurs when a nuclear weapon is detonated in the upper stratosphere or higher. Gamma rays interact with the earth’s magnetic field causing it to re-radiate a powerful EMP and scatter high energy electrons, creating a thousand times the EMP that the same weapon would cause in a lower-altitude burst.

NHEMP is not a single EMP pulse, but rather, it a pulse consisting of three separate components: E1, E2 and E3.

  • E1 is an extremely fast and brief pulse that induces very high voltages in electronics within roughly line of sight of the detonation. It affects all electronics that have sufficient conductive area, whether they are connected to the grid or not. It happens so fast (1-2 nanoseconds) that surge protection used in the power grid can’t clamp fast enough to stop it and will be disabled by it. Although surge protection with fast enough clamping times exists, it is not typically used since it’s more expensive and more commonly occurring surges are much slower than E1.
  • E2 behaves very much like lighting. Much of its effect on the grid would be protected against by lightening protection, if the lightening protection circuits were not already burnt out by E1 when E2 arrives. Like E1, E2 can also effect electronics whether they are plugged into the grid or not.
  • Unlike the previous two components, E3 induces extremely high voltages in long conductors that run parallel to the earth’s magnetic field such as power lines, phone lines, railroad tracks and metal pipelines. E3 travels through the grid, blowing fuses, destroying transformers, knocking out substations, power plants and burning out any sensitive electronics connected to the grid. Unlike the other two components, E3 only affects grid-connected electronics.

GIEMP is caused by the sun. Solar activity spews solar radiation which sometimes hits the earth and causes the earth’s magnetic field to re-radiate powerful E3 EMP toward the earth’s surface.

The affected area can be as small as a few hundred mile radius, or can be so large that it can affect the entire planet. Although the GIEMP can affect a greater area, it can’t perturb any electronics that are not connected to the grid.

NLEMP is similar to NHEMP, but it lacks the thousand-fold amplification caused by its higher-altitude sister. That’s because the nuclear weapon detonates too low to cause the earth’s magnetic field to re-radiate EMP.

How can we shield solar panels against all three components and all against all three threats? Just protect them against NHEMP, since it packs all three components and is the most powerful type of EMP.

Discover more about the effects of the EMP on How to Survive an EMP.

Use Faraday Cages for Your Solar Gear…

One of the key factors in protecting our solar gear is whether it is installed and in use or is in storage and will used after an EMP. Since stored panels aren’t plugged into the grid, we don’t have to worry about E3, and we can simply use a Faraday cage to shield against E1 & E2.

Keep in mind these important principles about Faraday cages, if you start building one by yourself:

  • Current should be able to travel unimpeded through the conductive outer skin of the Faraday cage. If you use an ammo can, for example, remove the paint where the lid touches the body of the box and remove the rubber gasket since they would impede the free flow of current through the can. If you want a tight seal, replace rubber gaskets with conductive gaskets.
  • Use sufficient shielding. The cage must provide at least 74dB of shielding. We should round up to 80dB to allow for wear and tear that will occur to Faraday cage over time. 1 mil of aluminum foil provides 96dB of shielding. If you use aluminum foil for the conductive skin, be sure that there is plenty of foil on foil overlap and that the pieces seal tightly to each other.
  • The cage needs a tight seal without any gaps or holes. Because of the large frequency range we must protect against a hole as small as a ¼ inch could compromise the integrity of the Faraday cage for our purpose.
  • A ground wire is not necessary to protect the contents of the cage. A Faraday cage can protect solar panels even if the cage is suspended in a vacuum. But because large currents could be induced into conductors, it is a good idea to ground large cages to prevent electrical shock when you touch the cage to open it. The larger the cage, the more important the ground is to prevent anyone from being shocked. For a cage protecting an entire building, for instance, a proper ground is strongly recommended.
  • Make sure that the inside of the Faraday cage is lined with non-conductive material. Prevent contact between the conductive skin of the Faraday cage and its contents. Create some distance between the solar panels and the cage’s conductive outer skin so that electricity can’t arc from the skin to your panels. Current will take the path of least resistance, so arcing large gaps will not be an issue unless the flow of the current through the cage’s conductive skin is impeded like in the example of the ammo can where paint along the lid to can contact surfaces and the rubber gasket should be removed.

Since most DIY Faraday cages are either too bulky, too heavy or too delicate to travel with you in your rucksack or backpack, another solution is needed to protect portable solar arrays, portable solar chargers and other portable solar gear in your pack.

portable soalr chargers

For example, I carry a USB solar recharging device in my bug-out bag. It has 2 small solar panels that charge a battery so that the device can recharge cellphones, MP3 players, GPS’s and other electronics. When I configure my pack as an “I’m Never Coming Home” or INCH bag (or whenever I want additional solar power), I add my packable, folding solar array. To protect portable solar equipment carried in my backpack, I use lightweight bags marketed as Faraday bags to shield them.

… or a Faraday Bag

While the bags are generally a little more expensive than a DIY Faraday cage, they have a few advantages over a cage:

  • Lighter weight
  • Less bulk
  • Waterproof
  • More durable

When choosing Faraday bags, be sure to select thick, puncture-resistant bags. Make sure to find out the strength of the shielding in the bags before you make a purchase.

I haven’t been able to find a single bag that provides 80dB of shielding! Most bags are designed to protect sensitive semiconductor products from electrostatic discharge or to hide your passport and credit information from would be identity thieves so the most shielding currently offered in a bag is a little over 40dB.

Since an NHEMP could produce almost double the field strength that 40dB of shielding will protect, take the added precaution of sealing your solar panels inside two layers of bags which each provide at least 40dB of shielding.

Some shielding is definitely better than no shielding, but there is no reason to run the risk. You may not be far enough away from “sky zero” for the field strength of the EMP to weaken enough that your panels will be safe.

Lastly, make sure that the bags that you choose have a non-conductive inner layer just like needs to be installed in a Faraday cage to prevent electricity from arcing from the conductive layer(s) of the bag into the solar gear that you are trying to protect.

In Conclusion

EMP caused by nuclear weapons has three different types of effects that need to protected against.

 

EMP caused by the sun will not affect devices that aren’t connected to the grid.

Solar panel & electronics stored in inexpensive shielding solutions such as Faraday cages and Faraday bags are only protected from E1 & E2 while they are inside their shielded storage containers!

And you know the principles involved in building an effective Faraday cage, what to look for in Faraday bags and that one layer of most of the bags on the market today is insufficient to protect against EMP.

Now you now know the basics of protecting your stored and portable solar gear against EMP in ways that almost anyone can afford!

Watch for a followup to this article tomorrow to learn the principles involved in protecting grid-connected solar installations like you may have mounted to your rooftop or near your home.

This article has been written by Cache Valley Prepper for Survivopedia.

This article first appeared at Survivopedia: How to Protect Your Solar Gear from EMP (Part 1)

BIG-emp

By

Every prepper has his/her own idea of what a major disaster will look like and how likely it is to occur.  However, one of the most catastrophic–not to mention scientifically plausible–is the EMP strike, which could be either natural or manmade.

EMP stands for electromagnetic pulse, and occurs in the form of a large burst of electromagnetic radiation that has the potential to disrupt electricity, radio waves, magnetic fields, Wi-Fi, and most other forms of electric currents we use on a daily basis.

The Effects of an EMP

Whether a potential EMP comes in the form of a manmade nuclear attack or a natural solar flare, the effects could be disastrous.  Granted, the devastation would largely depend on the strength and severity of the pulse and the location toward which it was geared.

In the worst-case scenario, an EMP could result in a total grid-down scenario and loss of all things electricity.

While this would cause most of mankind to resort to primitive measures of survival not seen since the Dark Ages, certain members of society would fare far worse than others.  Among the most at-risk for prolonged survival after an EMP are the elderly, the disabled, and young children and babies.

These individuals often require personalized medical care that involves the use of electronic systems, from diabetes test meters to respiratory aids to heart monitors, the functionality of which are threatened by an EMP.

Protecting Your Essential Electronics

empWith so many categories of individual at heightened risk of losing their life-support systems after an EMP strike, its important to have backups of the most essential life-sustaining devices stored in EMP-proof containers for the best chance at long-term.

Again, the effects electronic systems will suffer from an EMP largely depend on its size and altitude.  Some solar flares and low-output nuclear bombs may have very little electromagnetic effect on the earth, but precautions should be taken nonetheless.

Essentially, anything that can operate on a charge or on batteries when not plugged into an AC outlet is likely to be spared from an EMP attack.  If the device is kept away from other large metal objects and large swaths of wiring, it should remain relatively unharmed and continue to operate as long as its charge or batteries last.  Some electronics are inherently EMP-proof, including large electric motors, vacuum tube equipment, electrical generators, transformers and relays, and other large systems often housed in surge-resistant housing.

The Faraday Cage

One survival tool for electronically sensitive equipment is the Faraday cage, a metal box designed to absorb the surge of an EMP without harming its contents. Whatever it is being stored in the Faraday cage must be insulated from the inside metal surface of the box, but should otherwise remain protected. Accordingly, the box should be constructed so that no large gaps or holes are present.

However, many containers are suitable for impromptu Faraday cages including ammunition cases, metal filing cabinets, truck bed cabinets, and the like.  Therefore the thickness of the box doesn’t make much difference in determining its effectiveness against EMP waves, though thicker metal is likely to work better overall (think a large safe).

A big myth is that an EMP will wipe out the electronic components of most vehicles. On the contrary, the metal construction of most cars and trucks act as virtual Faraday cages for the electronic components contained within.  Therefore, if you were to insulate your vital medical electronics in tin foil, put them in a makeshift Faraday cage, and store it inside your vehicle, it should be protected from most moderate EMP strikes.

Ultimately, it’s all about how you insulate and shield your devices.  Thus, a washer or dryer could be used to store some larger or obscurely shaped devices if needed, so long as all sides are made of metal and have a tightly fitting lid.

For most home and commercial electronic devices, surge protectors and lighting arrestors serve to protect the systems from failure in the event of a power outage–fortunately they will also protect them against the effects of an EMP. While a powerful surge could wipe out the grid and shut off electrical services, the devices themselves would not be harmed if plugged into a surge protector.  However, they would need to be run on a backup power source in the event of this happening.

For better or worse, since we have yet to experience an EMP strike, its unknown as to how effective surge protectors and resistors will be in a real-world event. In the end, the best way to protect vital electronics, like those medical devices needed to sustain life, is to keep them disconnected from external power sources, away from antennas, and shielded in a well-sealed and insulated Faraday cage.

About EMPs

EMPs are most commonly associated with nuclear blasts, and were first tested under the American nuclear weapons development of the 1940s and 50s.

EMPs occur with all nuclear explosions, though the effects are much more profound with larger magnitude blasts.  The earth generally absorbs nuclear attacks close to the ground, like those experienced at Hiroshima and Nagasaki, so the effects of an EMP are confined to the areas affected by the blast and subsequent heat wave.  As the size and altitude of a nuclear blast increases, so too do the potential for greater EMP effects.

Thus, an EMP would deliver the most devastating effects to earth if a nuclear weapon exploded in space–or high in the earth’s atmosphere.  This would cause the gamma radiation released by the blast to strip electrons from the upper levels of the atmosphere and create electromagnetic radiation levels capable of disrupting most of earth’s electronic systems.

Accordingly, scientists and astronomers have long been studying the effects of the radiation produced by solar flares.  As far back as 1859 with the Carrington Event (from August 28 till September 2), the largest geomagnetic storm ever recorded occurred and disabled telegraph systems all across Europe and North America.

emp1

A study conducted by Lloyd’s of London and the United States’ Atmospheric and Environmental Research (AER) estimated the results of such a storm would have a $2.6 trillion effect on the world economy.

More recently, a series of solar storms in the 1970s was substantial enough to bring an end to the widespread use of CB radios, in addition to disrupting commercial radio and television transmissions.

Like any disaster, there’s no way of knowing the true effects of an EMP until it actually happens.  Ideally, we will never know what that experience is like, as it could mean utter devastation for most of mankind in its worse form.

For those dealing with life-threatening medical issues, losing access to electricity may be a life and death scenario.  Most evidence suggests the likelihood of a worst-case scenario is slim, but if your life depends on it you should take the necessary precautions.

This article first appeared at Survivopedia: Protecting Your Devices from an EMP Attack

Photo sources: 1, 2, 3.