By Daisy Luther – The Organic Prepper

Making your own baby food is easy if you have a blender or food processor, but what if the power is out?

When my daughter recently had complications from oral surgery, letting her feast on nothing but ice cream for 10 days seemed pretty counter-productive to healing. While making her very soft diet for 10 days, the thought crossed my mind that post-collapse, people with dental issues and babies will still need to eat long after the jars of Gerber are gone. (And really, a lot of that jarred food is pricey and isn’t made from the best quality products, which means that making your own is a thrifty and healthful idea regardless of the circumstances.)

But, without our normal kitchen gadgets like stick blenders, food processors, and blenders, what’s the best method to make purees?

Making a puree without kitchen gadgets is only slightly more time-consuming. The only kitchen implements you need are probably things you already have on hand.

  • A potato masher (for longevity, go with a sturdy metal one instead of a cheapo plastic one)
  • A metal strainer (you want the criss-cross mesh and not the kind with perforated circles for best results.) You can get this kind with feet or this kind with a handle. Note how the one with the handle has the little hooks on the opposite side – this will make your life much easier.
  • A large metal spoon

Like I said, you probably have all of these things – the links are for informational purposes so you can envision exactly what I’m talking about. Unless, of course, you have no spoons, strainers, and mashers. Then, by all means, pick them up.

Here’s how to prepare baby food without a food processor or blender.

I used this technique with grains (like pasta, oats, and rice), fruits, and vegetables with great success. You can add broth for a little bit of protein, or, instructions for preparing meat are below.

  1. Cook your ingredients until they are soft. You won’t be able to get the right texture with lightly steamed veggies. Generally, boiling will be the best way to cook the food.
  2. Use your mesh strainer to drain the cooked food, reserving the cooking liquid to add back in for the right consistency.
  3. Depending on the sturdiness of the food, you may need to use your potato masher to prepare the food for straining. Starchier foods like potatoes, carrots, and sweet potatoes, for example, will require mashing first. Once the food has been mashed, return it to the strainer.
  4. Place your strainer over another pot or a large bowl. Using your large metal cooking spoon, press the food through the mesh strainer. The pieces left in the strainer can be used for the adults by adding them to a soup or casserole.
  5. If the puree needs thinning, add some of the cooking liquid back in a tiny bit at a time, stirring constantly to achieve your desired consistency. For a very young infant, you’ll require a much thinner puree. As the child gets older and more able to chew, it can be a bit thicker.

For older babies who are able to eat a wider variety of foods, the family’s dinner can often be processed this way so that they can enjoy the same meal.

How to prepare meat for baby food.

Meat is more difficult to prepare without a food processor but can be done for older babies. If your child is just starting out with solids and you are unable to puree it in a food processor, you may need to delay introducing it for a little while and just add bone broth to their vegetable purees.

  1. A slow-cooked, tender meat will yield the best results.
  2. Once the meat is very tender, cut it into tiny pieces – and by tiny, I mean about the size of a grain of rice.
  3. Place it back into the pot and use your potato masher to tenderize it even more.
  4. Stir in some broth or add a vegetable/grain puree.
  5. Press this through a colander with bigger holes. Strain thoroughly to ensure the pieces are small enough that your baby won’t choke.

There’s also the option of this baby food-making gadget.

The methods above all use simple, easily accessible products that most people already have in their kitchens.

However, if you like gadgets and your kitchen is not overflowing with them, this potato ricer would easily strain the daylights out of some baby food, performing all of the tasks that your three kitchen tools above will.

Preserving baby food by canning

If you want to preserve some food during harvest time for baby to eat later, remember this one important thing:

You should NOT puree food before canning.

Whenever you puree a low acid food and can it, you run the risk of not reaching the appropriate internal temperature throughout the puree to keep the food safe from botulism. Botulism can be deadly for a healthy adult – it would be difficult for an infant to survive a bout of the disease.

If you are putting food back for baby, can the item as is normally directed. For example, potatoes or squash should be diced, green beans should be cut into jar sized pieces – you get the idea. Then, at serving time, use the steps above to process the jarred food for baby. You won’t need to boil it any further to reach the appropriate consistency – just start right in with the straining and the smashing.

To learn how to safely home can fruits, vegetables, and more, check out my book, The Prepper’s Canning Guide.

This article first appeared at The Organic Prepper: The Prepper’s Guide to Making Homemade Baby Food (without a Blender or Food Processor)

About the author:

Daisy is a coffee-swigging, gun-toting, homeschooling blogger who writes about current events, preparedness, frugality, and the pursuit of liberty on her websites, The Organic Prepper and DaisyLuther.com She is the author of 4 books and the co-founder of Preppers University, where she teaches intensive preparedness courses in a live online classroom setting. You can follow her on Facebook, Pinterest, and Twitter,.

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By Jeanie – Modern Survival Online

Each year, the manufacturers who listen to their customers learn a little more about how their products are being used and what can be done to improve them. Then technology keeps advancing so the quality of materials and the designs improve year on year.

From backpacks to sling bags, messenger, laptop bags, pocket organizers and even a designer bag there is something to suit everyone’s taste and pocket and most importantly a bag that will fit all the EDC items. We have rounded up a select few popular EDC bags you should consider.

rush 12 tactical backpack

1. Backpack: TACTICAL RUSH 12

The Rush 12 is incredibly popular. It comes in 4 colors to suit different tastes and uses – Black, Multicam Sandstone and Double Tap. The design of this bag is great for someone who has to carry a reasonable amount of gear and equipment on their daily commute. The main compartment is 18″ x 11″ x 6.5″ and it has a 21.2 liter capacity (1296 cubic inch)

For people who like to be organized instead of rummaging around in a pack that has only two or so compartment this bag has 16 compartments including a fleece-lined sunglasses pocket. Winner! Then the zipper pocket inside the outside storage area fits an iPad mini snugly – so no extra case needed for that or a tablet of similar size either. In the main compartment you can fit a laptop and accessories.

Continue reading at Modern Survival Online: The 10 Best EDC Bags for 2017

By  – The Prepper Journal

Preparedness and self-sufficiency usually turns to food production at some point. Whether we’re old hats or just getting started, there are some set standards that tend to take place in the veggie garden. Sometimes they’re very well deserved. Sometimes, though, changing things up can make a difference in our ability to produce foods. Small scale or large, when it comes to the veggies, doing things differently can buy us the time and space to get started or expand our harvests.

Doing Things Differently

We may not have time for the conventional annual-veggie garden. The big square or rectangle of bare earth set off from the house takes a fair bit of time and water to maintain, even if there’s best management practices in place that return organic matter and keep the soil healthy.

Changing things up can help us save time, especially.

Where we place our veggies alone makes a huge difference for a lot of people. Growing in a bed system is its own article. So is mapping a home, yard, or larger property with a process called zoning. We can automatically make a few changes, however, to bring our veggies to more convenient locations.

Why is convenience entering the conversation?

Continue reading at The Prepper Journal: Start Gardening Differently

Survival 101: The Right Way To Determine If A Plant Is Edible

By Rich M – Off The Grid News

When those in the survivalist and prepping community talk about living off the land, the focus tends to be on hunting, with maybe a little fishing thrown in for variety. Being a carnivore myself, I happen to like that idea, but in reality, it’s not a complete picture. Our ancestors, if you go back far enough, lived as hunter/gatherers. We tend to focus on the hunting part, without talking much about the gathering part.

Hunting is all about animal protein, while gathering is about plants. Whether it’s nuts, berries, fruit, leaves or roots, plant life helps to sustain us as much as animal protein does. In fact, those who claim expertise in nutrition tell us that it should be the larger part of our diet.

Yet few of us know enough to gather plants for food, should we find ourselves in a survival situation. That’s dangerous, as it denies us a major source of the nutrition that we’ll so desperately need. Not only that, but last I checked, a plant can’t run away from us when we’re hunting it. So, gathering should actually be an easier way to find food.

Continue reading at Off The Grid News: Survival 101: The Right Way To Determine If A Plant Is Edible

By Carmella Tyrell – SurvivoPedia

I don’t know about you, but I would love to own about 25 acres of land in the middle of nowhere and live solely on what I develop from the land itself.

The sad fact is, most of people caught in a crisis will either live in bands of scavengers or wind up dead.

Even those fortunate enough to live on a homestead or in a dedicated survival group are apt to find themselves being attacked by anyone desperate enough to try and steal from them.

If you can afford to purchase land and live off grid, it offers a better standard of living and added peace and comfort in a time when just about everything else is falling apart. If you intend to succeed at moving off grid, there are 10 mistakes you must avoid at all cost.

Continue reading at SurvivoPedia: 11 Common Mistakes To Avoid When Moving Off-Grid

By Ken Jorgustin – Modern Survival Blog

Although it might be nice to pull your emergency kit behind you as pictured above pulling my cargo trailer, lets downsize it a bit to level-1…

Basic level-1 prepping and preparedness includes the following topics, of which today’s topic will cover the 72-hour kit for your car.

Water and Food
-72 hour kit for your car
-Disruption of electricity
-Kids and Pets
-First Aid and Medical
-Cash stash
-Seasonal considerations
-Safety and Security
-Consumable Supplies
-Gear
-Documentation and Planning

For an overview of level-1 preparedness, refer to the following post:
Prepping and Preparedness 1 -Overview

For an overview of levels 1-4, refer to the following post:
Prepping and Preparedness 1 – 4

Okay lets get started with putting together a 72-hour emergency kit for your car…

Continue reading at Modern Survival Blog: Level-1 Prepping and Preparedness -72 Hour Kit For Your Car

How to Make Your Own DIY MREs – Homemade MRE Tips

By Gaye Levy – Backdoor Survival

Upon request from our readers, I was asked to make a follow-up to the MRE article. In there, I had mentioned that creating your own MRE is more efficient and cheaper than buying one of the brand-names.

Therefore, I have compiled this information together as everything you’ll need to know about creating your very own MRE.

I will be going over what I had mentioned in the previous article as well as supplying you with the “how-to’s” in drying out food, properly compacting it all into air-tight storage, and the proper steps to take in preserving your MREs.

Remember, being that you’re able to decide what goes into these MREs, you have the freedom to use this information however you please

Continue reading at Backdoor Survival: How to Make Your Own DIY MREs – Homemade MRE Tips

About the author:

Gaye Levy started Backdoor Survival so that she could share her angst and concern about our deteriorating economy and its impact on ordinary, middle-class folks. She also wanted to become a prepper of the highest order and to share her knowledge as she learned it along the way. On Backdoor Survival you will find survival and preparedness tools and tips for creating a self-reliant lifestyle through thoughtful prepping and optimism.

To read more from Gaye, visit her website, Backdoor Survival. You can also follow Gaye on Facebook, Twitter, Google+ and Pinterest or purchase her eBook, The Prepper’s Guide to Food Storage on Amazon.com.