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How To Prep For A Harvey-Type Flood

Army National Guard photo by Lt. Zachary West

By Rich M – Off The Grid News

Hurricane Harvey has once again reminded us of the awesome destructive power that nature holds. For raw power, a major hurricane, like Harvey, surpasses anything man can create, even a nuclear bomb. The bomb’s energy is concentrated in a much smaller area, increasing its impact on whatever is within its blast radius. But the overall energy of a hurricane, spread over a much larger area and a much longer time, far surpasses it.

Most of the damage by hurricanes isn’t caused by the high winds, but by the water that they bring. It’s hard to believe, but water, something we need for life, is one of the most destructive materials on the earth. It can destroy anything, given enough quantity and time.

For this reason, as well as the suddenness of a flood hitting, it is difficult to defend against one. But if we want to be truly prepared for any disaster, then we must include the possibility of flooding in that preparation. There are few areas in the country that are not subject to the potential of flooding, even if the location is not considered to be in what is known as a “100-year flood zone.” Besides, there once was a time when the entire world flooded, so it’s not prudent to think any of us are safe.

It’s important to note that only people who live in one of those 100-year flood zones are required to buy flood insurance as a condition of their home’s mortgage. So, if you don’t live in one of those areas, you probably don’t have flood insurance. What this means is that if your home gets flooded, the insurance company isn’t going to help.

Continue reading at Off The Grid News: How To Prep For A Houston-Type Flood In Your Town

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Image Source: Pexels

By Staff Writer – The Survival Place Blog

When the world’s ending and there are no more manufacturing companies and farmers left to provide you with food, will you be able to survive? If the answer is “yes” because you’ve saved up tonnes of canned food, then there’s some bad news waiting for you: what will you do when it runs out? You can’t rely on the possibility of the world fixing itself after an apocalypse, and unless you’re going to hunt other people for their canned food then there’s only one way to feed yourself: being self-sufficient.

It’s easy to be self-sufficient, but you need to remember that there’s some skill involved and a lot of knowledge to pick up before you can really become self-sufficient with your food. So to help you get started, we’ve detailed four different methods of getting your own food so you can practice in the event the world is turned upside down.

Gardening

Gardening is basically just farming on a smaller scale. Start by learning how to grow vegetables and fruits in your backyard. Remember that the climate makes a huge difference to what you can and can’t grow, so don’t expect to grow everything in your backyard. Start with easy things to manage such as salad leaves, potatoes or beans. They’re relatively easy to get started with and they don’t require much work to get started. Once you’re comfortable with your gardening skills, expand by stretching your backyard, buying more plots of land, or writing down some farming notes in a handy notebook so that you’re ready.

Fishing

With so much water out there, there’s bound to be some fish in nearby lakes and rivers. If you’re lucky and live near a larger body of water, then the fish will be fresh and full of life. However, you may need to invest in a fishing boat or a similar device to get out further into the waters in search of more bounty. Check this trolling motor buying guide if you need a bit of assistance in picking the right motor for your needs. Remember that fishing requires a lot of patience and not everything you fish up is edible. Some fish might be infested with parasites and some might be covered in sewage and sludge from inner-city rivers.

Foraging

Foraging is a key still for any survivalist. Living off the land is something that many in the prepping community speak about, but people usually don’t know much about what is edible or not. You need to know where to find edible plants and fruits, you need to know what is poisonous and what is edible, and you need to be able to stomach nutritious plants even if they taste horrible. If you find yourself in a survival situation in the future with nothing but the land to live off, then you’ll be glad that you studied edible plants.

Hunting

Lastly, we can’t forget about hunting. While using a gun is the simplest method of hunting your prey, you may want to learn how to throw a spear, use a bow, or even create traps to get a hold of fast animals. Survival hunting, much like foraging, is an essential skill to learn but you need to be prepared to kill an animal for the sake of your own survival—something that not everyone can stomach.

This article was originally published at The Survival Place BlogFeeding Yourself the Self-Sufficient Way

The Best Way To Grow Indoor Potatoes Is In A ... Garbage Bag?

Image source: Pixabay.com

By Mary Dyer Off The Grid News

Potatoes are traditional vegetables that pretty much everybody loves. They’re easy to grow, and harvesting spuds is a little like hunting for buried treasure — but a whole lot easier.

While potatoes certainly aren’t your standard house plants, they’re surprisingly easy to grow indoors, and unlike planting in the garden, you get to control the growing conditions. Better yet, you can grow potatoes indoors any time of year, which means fresh potatoes for dinner, even when snow is falling.

By the way, while you can plant potatoes indoors in large buckets or plastic containers, it’s really fun to grow them in plastic garbage bags. Here’s how.

Continue reading at Off The Grid News: The Best Way To Grow Indoor Potatoes Is In A … Garbage Bag?

By Brian Thompson – AccuWeather

As Karl strengthens late this week, it will threaten Bermuda and lead to increased surf at U.S. East Coast beaches.

Karl weakened to a depression on Wednesday morning after moving through a hostile environment.

The storm will emerge into a more favorable environment, which will likely allow for strengthening into Friday.

Continue reading at AccuWeather: Karl to Stir Dangerous Surf Along Eastern US Coast While Eyeing Bermuda

High-Value, Low-Maintenance Crops For The Busy Homesteader

Image source: Flickr

By Amber Bogdanowicz Off The Grid News

Gardening is time-consuming for any homesteader or off-gridder, and the smart gardener is constantly looking for ways to make it easier.

Perennial crops are one of the easiest ways to save time, in that you only have to plant them once for them to keep producing. They are rare in North America gardens, but are the gift that keeps on giving!

The most common types of perennials are asparagus, rhubarb and artichokes. They require very little maintenance and can be harvested in the event of an insufficient production of annual crops.

Continue reading at Off The Grid News: High-Value, Low-Maintenance Crops For The Busy Homesteader

10 Vegetables That Just Might Grow Better In Containers

Swiss chard. Image source: Pixabay.com

By Mary Dyer Off The Grid News

Growing vegetables in containers is touted as something you do if you’re an urbanite without space for a “real” garden. People often turn to container gardening when back or knee pain make bending and digging too difficult, or when the soil is so poor that it’s incapable of supporting life.

How about growing vegetables in containers because it’s a rewarding, enjoyable activity? No excuse is required. More and more people are discovering that container gardening is a perfectly viable method for growing vegetable crops.

Container gardening is so popular these days that growers have created dwarf versions of even super-size plants (like watermelons).

In fact, some vegetables actually thrive in smaller accommodations.

Continue reading at Off The Grid News: 10 Vegetables That Just Might Grow Better In Containers

Junk The Water Hose For A Simple $35 DIY Rainwater Irrigation System

Image source: Gardenweb.com

By Joseph Gleason Off The Grid News

One of my favorite summertime passions is gardening. I generally attempt to grow all the needed vegetables I consume over the course of the summer as a way of ensuring I am eating high quality products while also saving a little bit of money.

I already use landscaping fabric to keep the weeds to a minimum, and I employ a variety of other methods to help with water retention in the soil. I am always concerned with maximizing space and effective pest control measures to ensure the crops I am able to harvest are the best I can get.

But one of the hardest things for me – with a busy summer schedule — is keeping track of watering the garden. I do my best to make sure that each plant receives the necessary amount each day if there is no rain, but this isn’t always an option. Just like everyone else, there are days that I just can’t get to it.

Continue reading at Off The Grid News: Junk The Water Hose For A Simple $35 DIY Rainwater Irrigation System