Outdoor Recreation

bugging out

By Jesse – Modern Survival Online

Unless you are already experienced at travelling in the wilderness you might be surprised to learn that hypothermia is actually the most common cause of death.

It might seem difficult to believe but a beautiful hot day can quickly turn into a very cold night. This is why it is essential to think carefully before you pack for your wilderness trip.

It is also important to consider how much you can comfortably carry. Filling your car boot is one thing but you are unlikely to be able to carry everything!

To give you an idea of how dangerous any wilderness can be you should consider the fact that 250 hikers are rescued every year when hiking down and back up the Grand Canyon. This is a place where there is a set route and plenty of help; imagine how much worse it could be in the real wilderness!

These are the most important items you need when packing for the wilderness:

Clothing

Food and water are essential, but you’ll find that shelter is even more important.

You can survive approximately 3 weeks without food, 3 days without water but just 3 hours without shelter!

The reason why is simple, as the chill sinks in your judgment will be affected and you’ll be unable to make rational decisions which could save your life.

Clothing must be the first thing you pack. The best idea is to pack many layers this will ensure you can regulate your body temperature easily.

Continue reading at Modern Survival Online: Packing For The Wilderness – What To Take

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rivers and streams interactive map

By Ken Jorgustin – Modern Survival Blog

The following Rivers & Streams online interactive map is pretty cool!

You can browse and zoom anywhere in the United States to discover rivers and streams.

And the really neat part is that clicking on a river or stream will trace it’s entire path either upstream or downstream (selectable).

Have you ever wondered where that note in a bottle might end up if you toss it into the river? This map will show you!

Knowing where rivers and streams come from, and where they’re going, could be a big help in planning a boating trip (canoe, kayak, fishing, etc..).

Continue reading at Modern Survival Blog: Rivers & Streams Interactive Map (Upstream & Downstream)

camping

By Jesse – Modern Survival Online

There are two ways of going camping successfully; the comfortable one and the not so comfortable option!

Camping often conjures up images of a tent, a clear but starry sky and the glow of the campfire.

Of course, this is one option, but it’s no longer the only one. Camping in your RV is becoming increasingly popular, providing the relative freedom of the open road with many of the home comforts. Potentially this is the best of both worlds!

Caravans and yurts are also options to give you feeling of freedom and being at one with nature. The choice is entirely yours, depending on which one you prefer.

Beds

One of the biggest differences is the bed you’ll be sleeping in. The traditional option for a tent is the airbed or even just a ground mat. These can be comfortable although they are unlikely to be as good as the bed you have at home.

Caravans and RV’s will often have a bed the same size as your home one. This means with a little research you can choose a really comfortable bed to help you sleep every night. Take a look at these online reviews at The Sleep Judge to help you decide.

It doesn’t matter which option you choose for your camping trip, the following 10 items are essential for all types of camping:

Continue reading at Modern Survival Online: 10 Must Bring Camping Essentials

Image Source: Pixabay.com

By Staff Writer – The Survival Place Blog

If you love nothing more than getting away from the city and adventuring out into the wild, you will likely love the idea of getting away for a camping trip at the weekend. As it’s still winter right now, it can be pretty unforgiving in the wild at night, and you will need to prepare a lot more for your trip out into the wild.

Camping in the winter might be cold, but it is also very tranquil and fun. Not many people choose the winter time to come out camping, so you will likely have the whole space to yourself, and beyond all that, you will be able to enjoy watching the stars and cuddling up beside the fire when the sun goes down.

If you want to shed a few post Christmas pounds and have a break with your family, get yourself a tent and head out into the wild this weekend. Before you go though here is a list of the winter camping essentials which you’ll need to take with you on the trip.

Navigation

For navigation, you will want a GPS or your phone, and also a compass and map just in case you run out of power and signal in the forest.

Sun protection

Although you might think that the sun can’t damage you in the winter, it is actually slightly lower at this time of year so you could end up burnt if you are out for too long. Bring along some sunscreen, sunglasses and lip balm to protect your lips from cracking in the cold.

Insulation
It goes without saying that you are in need of some layers in the winter. Mountain Goat Outdoor Apparel provides a range of thermal underwear, tops, fleeces, jackets, pants, gloves and hats to keep you warm and protected against the harsh conditions outside.

Light

Because the days are much shorter in the winter, you will need a few forms of light to keep you going. You will need a flashlight, headlamp and batteries ready in case they run out during the trip.

First-aid

Of course, every trip into the wild needs a first aid kit. You can get a kit from any drugstore for a great price.

Fire

If you are going to be spending some cold nights out in the wild and cooking food, you are going to need a fire to keep you and your food warm. Bring either a fire lighting kit, some matches or a lighter with you and you will be able to collect wood and make a fire on site.

Tools

In case of emergencies, bring along a Swiss Army knife, cooking equipment and duct tape.

Food

Potatoes, meat,  vegetables and of course marshmallows are a must here.

Water

Always pack more water than you will need, because you never know if something will go wrong. It may be useful to bring a water filter to if you need to drink from the river or lake.

Shelter

It goes without saying that you can’t go camping without a tent, sleeping bag and blankets!

Plenty to see and do but will the kids agree? Picture source

By Staff Writer – The Survival Place Blog

Children are great fun to be around. At least, that is until they get tired, hungry, bored, or frustrated. Then the fun ends, and you’re in survival mode trying to get through the minutes it takes to address their needs and soothe them back to fun mode. It’s not easy to spend a long vacation with kids. It’s even harder to make it through a camping trip. Here are just a few tips to help you survive your first camping vacation with your little ones:

Survive Boredom

The things that you love are definitely not the things your kids love. It doesn’t matter how badly you want to share your passion for fishing, the thrill of reaching the peak of that mountain, or the pleasure of foraging for food. You’re not going to convince them to share those feelings until they are ready. But while you’re pursuing your interests your kids are going to succumb to boredom. That’s when it can get really tough for all of you.

Electronic devices are the mainstay for kids these days but usually rendered useless when you’re out camping. Engage your children in plenty of activities and games that are relatively simple and short. The younger they are, the shorter the attention span. To keep it fun, you have to engage in that activity at their level. You’re going to need a lot of energy for that! Try building a den, hunting for fairies, and playing pinecone bowling.

Surviving Fussy Eaters

Camping is a struggle for fussy eaters. It doesn’t feel right for grownups to take bags of chips. They want to cook sausages and bacon and beans. If your kids are fussy, chances are they’re still quite young. Why not let them have a go at helping you prepare the meal? Safety is essential, so have a second adult nearby to help you.

You might not be keen to show them how to make a fire just yet, so use something like the everstryke pro. It will be quicker to get things going and will reduce the risk of injury or dangerous fire making. Next, you can ask your child to pour the beans or soup into the pot. You might prefer to place the pot on the campfire or stove. If you hold the handle, your little one might be happy to stir with a wooden spoon (wearing oven gloves or other safety equipment.) It’s amazing how much more fun it is to eat something when you’re prepared it yourself!

Surviving Bad Weather Misery

Kids hate being cooped up. If the weather is so bad you have to stay in the tent, make sure you have plenty of things to hand to keep them occupied. A coloring book, reading books, board games, and puzzles can all be handy here. Make up a game, or write a story together. Traditional games like charades can be fun here too.

Of course, if you have plenty of wet weather gear, then this might be the perfect opportunity for splashing about in muddy puddles. Sure, you’re all going to get a bit messy and a bit damp. Just head over to the shower blocks when you’re done. Kids don’t care about getting dirty. The fact you do care makes it so much more fun to do it!

Surviving The Long Hike With Little Legs

Taking a long walk is an essential part of any camping trip. The trouble is, those with the littlest legs don’t move so fast. And they’re the ones that tire quickly and want to be carried the rest of the way. It’s important you pitch your camping trip at the right level for the participants. If you have tiny tots, you’re going to have to carry them or walk shorter distances. It can’t be helped.

There are some very good carriers if your child is still toddling. They are quite comfortable for parent and passenger alike and allow you to walk as far as you want without your child getting tired. And if they want to sleep it will make no difference to you. Be wary of tough terrain though. Your balance and your weight will be altered!

Surviving Night Time Bathroom Breaks

It’s not often you get to pitch your tent close to the facilities you need most when you have kids with you. Night time is the worst time to need to go. However, it’s pretty much guaranteed your little one will want to go during the night. Torches and easy footwear are essential. The next problem is convincing a small child to walk out of the tent in the middle of the night to go and find the bathroom. Even with you, it can be a scary thing to do for a tiny tot.

Don’t fuel their fears if they’re nervous out in the open. Picture source

If your child is frightened, they might simply refuse. A wet sleeping bag is a disaster! Always carry a spare one, and make sure you know where laundry services are in the morning. Potties can be helpful or the portaloos you can get with camper vans. Still, it’s not pleasant for the rest of you in the tent, and hygiene could be a real problem. Try to make the excursion from the tent a fun adventure and nothing to worry about.

Surviving Insect Invasions

Kids really don’t like flies, roaches, spiders or other insects. Of course, if you’re going to sleep in their territory, there is little you can do about it. That said, it’s important to prevent bites and stings. A child-friendly insect repellent might help here. Make sure you’ve packed a full first aid kit that includes sting relief, bandages, plasters, and antibacterial creams. You might need extra tissues for the tearies too.

Camping should be fun for all the family, but you might have to give up some of the activities you would normally do on your own. Introduce new things one at a time. Little ones can become quite frightened by strange environments and noises. Bring a comforter, and get ready for the biggest adventure in parenthood so far!

 

Image Source: Pixabay.com

The Survival Place – Staff Writer

Being at one with nature has to come second. Being at one with yourself is much more important. Being confident in your skills of proficiency in a scenario where you’re left to your own devices, is the key to many survival mindsets. Being self-sufficient is perhaps the best ability you can have when you’re going out hiking, trekking up a mountain, or suddenly being lost out in the woods during a camping trip. However, it doesn’t come naturally to most people; therefore, it does put them off from going out and taking charge of their own adventure. But it can be learned, and much of that has to do with knowing what kinds of skills can be supplemented by modern technology. The combination of knowing the basics and being proficient in them can be complemented to a greater extent with the aid of gadgets that enhance those skills.

Map reading and orientation

Knowing where you are on a map is paramount to being aware of where you came from, where you are and which direction you should be travelling in. Without the know-how to reading a map, you can only turn back around and restart your adventure. You can learn how to read a map online with many different options at your disposal. You can play online games, watch detailed and lengthy walkthroughs from the basics of advanced techniques on video sharing websites, as well as the good old fashioned way of learning from a skilled bushcraft teacher. Together with this, you can get a GPS electronic map, which can pinpoint your location with precision. This kind of portable, handheld technology is great as a backup for your map reading skills and imperative in a life and death situation.

Forging ahead in the dark

Sometimes when you’re out on adventures, the night can suddenly take you by surprise. Without the proper technology and gadgets to help you see in the dark, you will have to bed for the night, exactly where you are at that moment. There are some great reviews on http://offthegridguru.com/ for tactical flashlights that are small and extremely useful in a tight situation. They can also be attached to things like clothing, hats and fitting onto your backpack. There are other reviews on the website that include tactical tomahawks which are useful cutting and shaping tools. Military watches are also put under the spotlight, but more of all, the tactical torches of the modern market are put through their paces.

Image Source: Pixabay.com

Cutting before building

Every single adventurer should be carrying with them a good sharp bushcraft knife. This can cut branches and shape them; it can also help to make you tools which you can use to make other survival necessities. Being self-sufficient starts with being able to carve out tools from pieces of timber, making small changes to equipment, and or cutting through something that is hindering your ability to progress. The knife is the first and foremost tool of anyone looking to take care of themselves on their trip.

Being self-sufficient is one of the keys to being confident during a survival scenario. However being great at the basics can be further improved by the use of modern gadgets and technologies, helping you to survive and thrive in the wildness of nature.

The Survival place Blog: Self-Sufficiency Is A Powerful Tool That Can Be Learned

TakeOutdoors Infographic on Things to Do When Lost

From our friends over at TakeOutdoors.com , check out the complete article here it’s worth the read: How To Navigate In The Woods – The Traditional Way

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