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The Silent-But-Deadly Weapon Missing From Most Survival Caches

By Rich M Off the Grid News

If there’s anything that will bring up controversy in the world of survival and prepping, it’s a discussion about weapons. Everyone has their own ideas about what’s the best, and most of those ideas are based upon some pretty sound reasoning.

The truth is there is no one perfect weapon or even set of weapons that is the perfect solution in all situations. What is ideal in one scenario might be the worst possible choice in another.

Then there are the individual factors that have to be considered. Not all survivalists are created equal. Each is an individual mix of skills, abilities, thoughts, needs and capabilities. Something that might be an excellent weapon for one person might be the worst possible choice for another, simply because he or she doesn’t have the strength to use it properly. What might be ideal at one point in our lives may turn out to be less than ideal as we improve our skills.

Continue reading at Off The Grid News: The Silent-But-Deadly Weapon Missing From Most Survival Caches

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winterfirearm

By Jeremiah Johnson – Ready Nutrition

Many guys and gals may wonder, “Why do we have to maintain firearms in the wintertime, since we’re not using them as much?” Well, there are different conditions to deal with in the wintertime that may affect your firearms adversely.  Many will just wrap them up in plastic after coating them with Cosmoline or some other lubricant-preservative.  This does not necessarily protect them from changing conditions during the wintertime that may go unnoticed.

First, I stress that you should clean and inspect your weapons at a minimum of once per week.  If it is done less frequently, then you must take several factors into consideration: temperature, change in temperature, humidity, sunlight, and location your firearms are kept/stored.  If you happen to have a temperature/climate-controlled gun storage safe or the equivalent, then you can “whittle” your time down for disassembly and inspection of your firearm.  For the rest of us (myself included), a regular maintenance program is essential.

Depending on where in your house you store your firearm and how you store it (in a gun safe, or a moisture-controlled case, for example) will dictate the challenges you’ll face.  Alternating temperatures cause some problems.  If you have a home that (when you’re inside of it) the temperature is kept at 70 degrees F or such, if the temperature drops to say 50 or 60, you may have problems with moisture.  The weather (and the relative humidity) will also be a factor.


Metal tends to “sweat” with a change in temperature, that is for condensation to build up, especially when the change is drastic or sudden.


You’ve been outside all day hunting that deer with your Winnie ’94 30-30.  You just came into the house, and after kicking off your boots you hung your Winnie ’94 up on the gun rack.  Guess what?  In about ten to fifteen minutes, even if you were as dry as dust coming through the door…the weapon will have condensation all over it from the sudden change in temperature.

Another scenario is that you must vent out the house a bit: your woodstove has been on “overdrive” and you need to air out the place just a tad.  It’s raining outside and humid.  When that cold air and moisture wafts inside, guess where it’ll go?  Yep, right onto the barrel and mechanism of that trusty rifle you have hanging over the mantelpiece.

Another one is that you have a rack in your bedroom, and you opened the drapes to allow a little sunlight into the room…and it just happened to hit your rifle on the rack.  The rifle gains about 20 degrees from the sun, and then when it leaves, the coolness of the room and the weapon’s proximity to the window causes the sweating.

During the wintertime, it isn’t enough just to pack it all up and wait until the springtime.  As far as things are with me, the only time I would ever pack one up is if I’m transporting it somewhere and it needs to be encased and protected for a few days to a week.  Other than that, I stick to my regular maintenance schedule.  First thing you do, is wipe off any excess moisture on the weapon.  Then completely disassemble it and carry out an inspection of all your parts.  You are looking for any debris and any buildup of ferrous oxide (that’s rust!) from excessive moisture.  There shouldn’t be any.

The reason there shouldn’t be is that there will not be…if you carry out a regular program of maintenance.  You haven’t fired it; however, you can still run patches through the bore with a light coating of lube on them.  Clean off any rust and oil all your parts.  It protects from rust or moisture.

Also, want to save a little money?  You don’t have to bankrupt yourself on those stingy little bottles of lube/gun oil…a 3 or 4-ounce bottle…for 7 or 8 dollars.  Go buy yourself a quart of 5W/30 Mobil Synthetic oil.  We used to use it in the service, and I still use it now.  Does the job just as good and (most of the time) better than those cheap, thin, junk oils such as Hoppe’s or Remington’s or the like.  A quart will last you a long time, and then you just refill the small bottles that you normally use with it.

Same for patches.  Take an old t-shirt, sheet, or pillowcase.  Cut out your squares on your own, and also cut yourself some 1’ squares for general purpose weapons cleaning rags.  These can be washed and then reused a couple of times.  Use a bristle brush of some kind and brush the oil vigorously all over your working parts, and then wipe off any carbon and/or rust you have.  Then give it a fresh coat (thin), and reassemble the weapon.  Voila!  Your weapon is good to go.  Make sure that when you reassemble it that you perform a functions check on it, and ensure that it has been reassembled properly without any glitches.

One thing you can also do is to “shroud” your weapons.  This is merely covering them as they are on a rack with a sheet of some kind.  Try to match the surrounding colors of the room.  If you have a white wall, then a white sheet would be a good thing.  This keeps dust from settling on the weapon, and any ash/soot from the woodstove, as well.  It also keeps your weapons out of sight for when some “snoopy” human comes over to the front door, such as the ever-present, never-reliable neighbors, or some door-to-door sales clown, or some other pest.  The less they see the better.

Minimum of once per week per firearm.  An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure, as Ben Franklin once said.  Protect them within a case for when you’re traveling, and remember to give them a good wiping down and a thorough lube when you reach your destination.  Maintain that firearm at all times, and it’ll see you through, whether you’re hunting deer or stopping someone from breaking into your home.  Keep that powder dry and stay in that good fight!  JJ out!

This information has been made available by Ready NutritionThe Importance of Firearms Maintenance in the Wintertime

 About the author:

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

 

The Lightweight, Ultra-Portable Survival Rifle That’s Just 16 Inches Long

Image source: Henry Rifles

By Mike S. – Off The Grid News

A survival rifle is typically a minimalist rifle that can be broken down and stored in a vehicle, boat, aircraft or backpack and brought to use as a “last resort” firearm for taking wild game. As such, it is typically chambered in calibers like 22 LR, 22 Hornet or 410 shotgun. A typical survival rifle is not the ideal firearm for big-game hunting or home defense. This is something to have when you may need it most. One of the most popular designs was built by Armalite as the AR-7.

The concept of a survival rifle goes back to World War II. Pilots who were shot down but survived behind enemy lines were mostly lucky to have a revolver or maybe even an M1911A1. Those might be good for personal defense if you had to parachute into no-man’s land, but what if you had to bail out on a deserted island with no food prospects?

Continue reading at Off The Grid News: The Lightweight, Ultra-Portable Survival Rifle That’s Just 16 Inches Long

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Image Source: Pixabay.com

By The Survival Place Blog

The topic of children and guns has been a hot one, over the last few years. With accidents claiming the lives of children across the world, it’s easy to see why. But, most people’s reaction to this, is to never expose their kids to guns at all. This doesn’t work very well, though, if you’re a gun owner. Or, even if you just want your kids to be as safe as possible.

It’s important to be aware of the dangers of having guns around your little ones, so this post will go through some of the things to think about. Obviously, it’s ultimately your choice as a parent, as to how you treat your children. So, just use this for reference.

Safety In The Home

If you keep guns at home, there are certain measures you need to take. Keeping a gun in a draw or under a bed doesn’t really cut it. If you want to keep guns at home, ideally you should have a gun safe. Obviously, these are expensive and mainly to deter theft. If you want a more affordable alternative, you can look into other lockable containers.

Any guns that you carry, keep in the car or have to leave out, should all be unloaded with ammo far away. A young child will find it very hard to load a gun; but older children, with some experience, can be a much bigger danger. Keeping ammo and the weapon separate limits the risk dramatically.

Education

Starting from a young age, you should educate your children surrounding gun safety. Teaching your children that guns are dangerous, and should only be used in emergencies, will give them a good respect for the risks involved. You should also teach them that the guns in your home are off limits. Let them know where the guns are kept, under lock and key, but assert that they are never to be played with.

As your child gets older, you’ll want to give them some hands-on education. It is better to start with a BB gun or Airgun, before moving on to a real one. This will give you an opportunity to teach your children to handle guns correctly, without the danger of a real gun. You won’t struggle to find airsoft guns for sale, and they’re very affordable.

Teaching your children early on and throughout their lives will build their confidence. Confidence is key in avoiding accidents. Someone with more confidence will handle a weapon with greater precision and purpose.

Observation

Once you have taught your children, you need to watch them. Study how they operate and handle the weapons they use. This will give you a good insight into how you should proceed with further education.

Never leave your children alone with a weapon. Most accidents involving children and guns are as a result of no supervision. Children rarely want to hurt themselves or others; you just need to watch that they don’t make a mistake.

Hopefully, this will give you somewhere to start. Make sure that you research the laws and regulations that apply to your home. You can seek advice from your government and professionals if you’re still concerned.

This article first appeared at The Survival Place Blog: Keep Those Whipper Snappers Safe: Gun Saftey And Kids

How To Revive Old Guns

By  – SurvivoPedia

If your firearms require repair after a social collapse, it will be too late to start thinking about how to work on firearms and keep them in good working order. Now is the time to start learning how to repair and maintain your firearms so that your guns are always ready to serve your needs.

You Need to Be a Gunsmith and a Blacksmith

These days, if your handguns, rifles, or shotguns need repair, you can just take them to a gunsmith, or return them to the manufacturer for factory warranty work.

Continue reading at SurvivoPedia: How To Revive Your Old Guns And How To Use Them

3 Traits That Separate True Survival Knives From Worthless Ones

Image source: Koster Knives

By Kevin Danielsen – Off The Grid News

Let’s go over a bit of “basic survival knife 101” and talk about what makes for a good piece of sturdy, handy, sharpened steel to make your time in the sticks just a little bit easier.

However, there is one thing I did want to mention before we begin: I’m personally not much of a believer in the modern “survival” knife concept.

Yes, it is true.

Let’s just say that I don’t believe I’ve ever seen or held a real survival knife — at least, as it’s described in many popular gear magazines — and that’s because I’m fairly certain that they don’t exist. In my own backwoods experience and years of study, there are many types of knives that make for excellent companions. To depend on only one just doesn’t make much sense.

What Makes a Good Knife?

Continue reading at Off The Grid News: 3 Traits That Separate True Survival Knives From Worthless Ones

4 Stunning Long-Range Rifles That Will Shoot Past 1,000 Yards

Image source: Cadexdefence.com

By Mike S. Off The Grid News

Perhaps the most impressive display of marksmanship is true long-range shooting. Reaching out to a target at 1,000 yards or beyond requires skill, knowledge and lots of practice to do it right.

While some may deem it as impractical to hit a target at half a mile, the amount of research that goes into selection of the rifle, optics and ammunition — plus learning how to read wind, observe the effects of humidity, air pressure and elevation are all factors that will make you a better shooter in the long run.

Yes, it is true that long-range shots can be made with typical rifle calibers such as 308 Winchester, 30-06 Springfield and 7.62 X 54R, but these calibers were not designed with extreme ranges in mind.

Here are four long-range rifles you should consider:

1. 300 Winchester Magnum

Prized for its ability as a flat-shooting cartridge, the 300 Winchester Magnum is capable of…

Continue reading at Off The Grid News: 4 Stunning Long-Range Rifles That Will Shoot Past 1,000 Yards