Emergency Survival Tips

How To Treat Gunshot Wounds When There’s No Doctor

By Rich M – Off The Grid News

Accidents happen; that’s a basic fact of life that we have to deal with. We have a huge medical infrastructure to deal with those accidents. Even so, the action that is taken immediately, at the time and scene of the accident, can be the most important part of treating the patient and ensuring their survival.

This is even more critical in situations where medical services may not be available. I don’t care if you’re talking about a post-disaster scenario, a hunting trip or hiking in the mountains, people can get hurt. In any of these situations, and many more, you’re unlikely to find a hospital emergency room, ambulance or even an EMT standing there, ready and waiting for you.

Active shooter situations, as well, warrant the need for quick first-aid. One of the things that has helped to reduce the number of deaths in some active shooter situations, even with the shooters creating more casualties, is a major difference in police response. Law enforcement agencies are training the officers on the street in trauma care, especially for gunshot wounds, and providing them with an IFAK (Individual First-Aid Kit). This allows officers arriving on the scene to pick one casualty, provide them with emergency treatment, and transport them to an emergency room in their cruiser.

You or I can do the same, with just a little bit of knowledge and a basic IFAK. Please note that this is different than the type of first-aid kits we can find at the corner pharmacy, as it is intended specifically for treating major trauma cases, especially gunshot wounds.

Continue reading at Off The Grid News: How To Treat Gunshot Wounds When There’s No Doctor

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By The Survival Place Blog – Staff Writer

When it comes to prepping and focusing on your survival plan, there is one unavoidable
issue that many people find themselves experiencing: where do you find the money to pay
for all this stuff?

There’s no way of sweetening the truth, unfortunately; prepping is an expensive business,
The reason for this is simple: you’re shopping for your life in the future, as well as trying to
maintain the budget you spend on the life you’re living right now. Finding the funds to
undertake all the survival strategies you want to have in place is undoubtedly going to cost
money.

Below, we’ll explore a few ideas you might want to either keep in mind or utilize for your own
purposes. If you have budgetary constraints that are damaging your ability to prepare
efficiently, then here’s what you need to know…

Getting started is the hard part

When you first begin to look into establishing a survival plan, you will find yourself needing to
find money for a variety of supplies. The initial cost of prepping can be extremely expensive,
so much so that some people decide to ignore the need to prep due to budgetary constraints
alone.

Try and see the starter phase as just that; something you have to endure that allows you to
make a start, and then things will settle down. Step one is always the hardest to take; just reassure yourself that the startup costs are not a true reflection of the amount of money you need to spend on a monthly basis.

When you have established the basics and fought through the starter phase, you should find that the demand on your budget becomes more reasonable. You should find that, in time, prepping will actually save you money if you do it correctly. So while the starter phase is tough and may lead you to having to go without a few luxuries, try to see it as a short-term pain for a long-term gain.

Start with an essential kit

Your first step for prepping should be an essential kit; something that you can transport or use at home. Thankfully, a basic kit does not have to cost the earth if you’re short on cash.

Here’s a quick list to get you started:

Baking soda

● Puts out fires,

● Can be used as a toothpaste and deodorant,

● Effective antacid for stomach issues…

● … and many more.

Paracord

This video provides excellent insight into just how useful paracord can be:

Tin Cans

● Can be turned into cutting cools,

● Can be used to make arrowheads or hooks for fishing,

● Can be punctured to create a shower head of sorts.

Dry-packaged foods

● Buy products near the end of their “best before” date; any prepper will know that “best before dates” are to be treated with suspicion anyway.

Medications

● Buy off-brand medication; it’s just as effective and is far more cost-efficient.

● Don’t go overboard on bandages, as other items of clothing can substitute in if needed.

Duct Tape

● Buy cheap off-brand versions; they might not be as effective, but they’re better than nothing. You can usually find cheap options on eBay that will be suitable for most tasks.

Plastic Tarpaulin

● Again, look online for the best deals; you should be able to find a decent size tarpaulin relatively cheaply.

The above items are inexpensive, easy to find, and incredibly beneficial in a survival situation. While you may want flashier, more expensive items, they’re not essential. Focus on the basics to begin with, and then you can begin to add more items from the helpful list provided on Free Survival Gear as your funds allow.

Focus on small changes you can make at home

When you have an essential kit put together, you can then move on to inspecting your home to see what changes you can make. Just remember to take it slowly.

What you should prioritize here depends on your personal feelings. Some preppers put weaponry at the top of the list, others prefer to stockpile food. Just remember to focus on slowly building your supplies piece by piece.

Many of the changes that you can make can save you money rather than cost it. If you’re concerned about food, then you’ll want to make use of some of the ideas found in this video:

Or if weaponry is your main concern, the cheap, simple catapult this video shows you how to make is definitely better than nothing:

Okay, so the above aren’t going to create a six-month supply of food overnight or provide army-level defense, but they are better than nothing. This term should become the motto for anyone who is prepping on a budget: you’re not making the huge preparations you wish you were, but what you are doing is better than nothing.

A final thought…

It can be tough to keep your motivation going when you’re prepping on a budget; you won’t
have an impressive stash to show off, or an armory to delight in, or all the latest gadgets to
bring a smile to your face. However, it’s important to remember that anything you do is still
going to make you more prepared than 95% of the populace. Even the smallest, most minor
survival prep you do is beneficial when compared to almost everyone else, so don’t be
dissuaded from your goal.

In conclusion

Prepping is expensive, but it’s also necessary. If you keep the above points in mind and try
out a few of the provided tips, you should be able to build a survival plan without risking
bankrupting yourself to do it. Slow and steady wins the day, so be patient, and you’ll get
there.

Budget For Now Or For Survival? Money Worries For Preppers

By Daisy Luther – The Organic Prepper

Imagine getting a phone call like this from your high school aged child.

“Mom, there’s been a shooting. I’m running.”

Those were the chilling words heard by a mom in Kentucky yesterday when her son was fleeing from a classmate who killed 2 students and injured 17 more. The two 15-year-olds died at the hands of another 15-year-old boy, who was later arrested.

Shocked students have described the terrifying moment the shooter opened fire before classes began, forcing nearly 100 children to run out of the school and seek safety.

‘He was determined. He knew what he was doing,’ a classmate said of the shooter.

‘It was one right after another – bang bang bang bang bang. You could see his arm jerking as he was pulling the trigger.’

Another student said: ‘No one screamed. It was almost completely silent as people just ran.

‘He just ran out of ammo and couldn’t do anything else. He took off running and tried to get away from the officers.’

…Mitchell Garland, who rushed outside of his business when he heard about the shooting, described seeing the students flee the school.

‘They was running and crying and screaming,’ he said. ‘They was just kids running down the highway. They were trying to get out of there.’ (source)

The scene was utter pandemonium.

It can happen anywhere.

No place is safe from the violence these days. This was the tiny town of Benton, Kentucky, population 4,531.

Would your child know what to do in the event of a school shooting?

There are a few important things to note in the story about this horrible incident. Four of the kids who were injured weren’t shot – they got hurt fleeing the scene. And secondly, first responders shut down all the exits, meaning the shooter – and kids who were still inside – couldn’t escape.

As horrific as it is to think through a scenario like this, doing so could save your child’s life. And this information isn’t just for kids in the school system. Even homeschooled kids can sometimes be in a situation where they are without a parent and a bad thing happens, like sports practice, church events, or other outings.

One thing to consider that could be pre-emptive is to teach your kids to be nice people. This shooting, like many others, is said to have been triggered by extreme bullying. I’m not blaming the victims who were shot, but we all bear the responsibility to treat others kindly.

Acceptance is the first step to surviving an attack.

In many of the descriptions of this shooting, students said they heard a “popping” noise and didn’t really grasp what was happening.

It’s the actions you take immediately upon the realization something awful is occurring that have the potential to save your life. And the first step to that is accepting that a terrible thing truly is happening. In an article called How to Survive Anything in Three Easy Steps, I wrote:

No matter what situation comes your way, the first step is to accept that whatever the event is, it really happened.  This is tougher than it sounds, because our minds are programmed to protect us from emotional trauma.  Cognitive dissonance means that when a reality is uncomfortable or doesn’t jive with a person’s beliefs, that person may opt to believe in something false just to assuage his desire for comfort. Psychologist Leon Festinger, who identified the principal of cognitive dissonance, suggested  “that a motivational state of inner tension is triggered by logically inconsistent ways of thinking.”

If you’re wondering exactly how powerful cognitive dissonance can be, check out Amanda Ripley’s book, The Unthinkable: Who Survives When Disaster Strikes – and Why.  Ripley, a journalist, covered many disasters of immense scale: plane crashes, natural disasters, and 9/11.  She became curious about the difference between those who survived, and those who did not, wondering if it was dumb luck or if there was some other quality that made survival more likely. She interviewed hundreds of survivors and got her answer.  The ability toimmediatelyaccept what was occurring was the quality most of the survivors possessed.

The story that stands out in my mind the most was the one about the people in the World Trade Center on September 11. They described the last time they saw some of their coworkers.  There were many people who simply could not accept the fact that a plane had crashed into the building and that they must immediately evacuate. They gathered their belongs, tidied their desks, finished reports. They didn’t feel the same sense of urgency that those who survived did, because the situation was so horrible that they just couldn’t accept it. Their inability to accept the scope of the danger caused many of them to perish in a tragic incident that other people, who acted immediately, survived.

When disaster strikes, you can’t spend 5 minutes thinking, “This can’t actually be happening.”  It is happening, and moving past accepting that propels you through the first step into the second one.

The people who freeze in a mass shooting have done nothing but make themselves easier targets. Freezing is an innate reaction for some people, but you can train your way through that. Training in self-defense, first aid, and disaster preparedness can help to offset the brain’s neurobiological response that leaves some people paralyzed with fear.

Pat Henry of The Prepper Journal recommends action plan simulations to help you become more prepared for a sudden crisis. He wrote:

When you are out in public, try going for an hour without looking at your phone to start with. Instead, observe your surroundings. Who is near you and who is walking toward you? Does anything seem suspicious? If something were to happen, what would you do and where would you go. Do you know the quickest way to get out if needed? Can you access your concealed weapon if you need to? Imagine what you would do if you were out at a mall with your family and someone started shooting. Where would you take cover? What would be your escape route? What if that was blocked?

It isn’t fun to go through this exercise with your kids, but it could save their lives.

There are 4 courses of action

We can’t always predict when an attack is about to happen. There might be no indications in your immediate surroundings to alert you to the fact that something is going down. At school, your kids are in comfortable surroundings and they don’t have their guards up. They may be blithely unaware until the moment the first shot is fired.

If your child suddenly finds himself/herself in the midst of a school shooting, he/she needs to be ready to take one of the following courses of action:

1) Escape. Get as far away from the threat as possible. If you can do so safely, run for the doors and if you can’t get to a door, don’t be afraid to pick up a chair and smash out a window. This will take some forethought because most kids would need to get past the mental taboo of destroying school property. Teach kids to run in a zig zag pattern from cover to cover in order to be more difficult targets.

2) Take cover. If you can’t get away, get behind something solid and wait for your opportunity to either escape or fight back. Make sure your kids know the difference between cover and concealment. Many schools have thick concrete walls that will provide sturdy cover, but a wooden door or a desk will not.

3) Hide. If you are in another part of the building and you hear shots, your first choice should be to escape. But, if you aren’t in a place where you can safely do that, you may be able to quietly hide somewhere. Bathrooms aren’t ideal, but hiding quietly in a locked classroom with the lights out may keep you away from the shooter.

3) Fight back. This is absolutely a last resort. When you aren’t armed, you will be at a serious disadvantage against an armed opponent. The only possible advantage is the element of surprise. Most people with a gun don’t expect a direct challenge. If you have absolutely no other option, you should be prepared to fight for your life. Go in low to knock the shooter down, from behind if possible. A group of students will have a better chance of subduing the shooter than one student alone. Obviously, this is an action to be taken by older kids. Younger children would be unlikely to launch an effective attack.

Some security companies are now doing training with schools to help them respond more effectively in the event of a school shooting. As a parent, encourage your local school board to consider investing in such training.

Have you talked to your children about school shootings?

Have you had this uncomfortable discussion with your children? Do you have tips that weren’t included in this article? Please share them in the comments below.

This article first appeared at The Organic Prepper: Would Your Kids Know How to Survive a School Shooting?

About the author:

Daisy Luther

Daisy is a coffee-swigging, gun-toting, homeschooling blogger who writes about current events, preparedness, frugality, and the pursuit of liberty on her website, The Organic Prepper. Daisy is the publisher of The Cheapskate’s Guide to the Galaxy, a monthly frugality newsletter, and she curates all the most important news links on her aggregate site, PreppersDailyNews.com. She is the best-selling author of 4 books and lives in the mountains of Virginia with her two daughters and an ever-growing menagerie. You can find Daisy onFacebookPinterest, and Twitter.

Prepping For An Evacuation: How To Be Ready When The Gov't Says ‘Get Out’

By Rich MOff The Grid News

Mother Nature has incredible power available at her fingertips — much more than we humans do. With water alone, she is able to destroy some of mankind’s greatest accomplishments. Water leveled the city of Miyako, Japan, in 2011, as a tsunami brought a wave surge 128 feet high. Water also destroyed much of New Orleans when Hurricane Katrina hit the city in 2005.

Currently, Northern California is closely watching the destructive power of water, as the spillway for our nation’s highest dam, the Lake Oroville Dam, is crumbling.

What has caused the damage to that dam’s spillway? Just water. Erosion has created a 200-feet-long by 30-feet-wide rupture in the spillway, opening the way for more erosion. The emergency spillway is being eroded away rapidly, as well, as waters rise above the lake’s capacity.

Continue reading at Off The Grid News: Prepping For An Evacuation: How To Be Ready When The Gov’t Says ‘Get Out’

survival priorities

By Ken Jorgustin – Modern Survival Blog

A few thoughts about prioritizing one’s priorities in a survival situation.

Whether you are planning for, or actually encountering an emergency or disaster, consider this list of priorities.

 

THE RIGHT ATTITUDE FOR SURVIVAL

Attitude.

Improvise, Adapt, and Overcome

Beginning with, and maintaining an attitude that includes positivism, adaptability, and clear thinking. One’s immediate assessment, decisions and subsequent actions are foremost.

The opposite would include panic, undue pessimism, brain freeze.

The following list is a good framework and basic approach to have in the back of your mind when it comes to survival situations:

Continue reading at Modern Survival Blog: Survival Priorities During An Emergency

By Joe Humphries – High Tech Safety

Packing a useful survival kit depends a lot on what sort of emergency situations you expect that you’ll encounter. However, there are some items that are more universally helpful than others. Here are five items every survivalist needs in their pack.

Multi-Tool

When it comes to survival kits, you want to maximize every inch of real estate in your bag, which is why a multi-tool is an absolute must for any prepper. No matter how prepared you may be, you can’t always predict what you’ll encounter in a survival-type situation. So, including a tool that serves multiple purposes is a good way to cover all your potential bases.

A multi-tool can be as basic or feature heavy as you’d like. They range from the classic Swiss Army Knife to tools that boast 20 or more features—including everything from saw blades to pliers to wire cutters. Even the most complicated of multi-tools are generally small and lightweight, so don’t be afraid to purchase one that’s got as many gadgets as your budget will allow.

Water Purification System

In a survival situation, locating drinkable water will be one of your first and most important priorities. A water filtration system makes this task easier by converting a water source that might be dangerous for consumption into one that’s safe and usable.

You now have several options when it comes to choosing a purification system. The most basic choice is water purification tablets. These pills are dissolved in water and are designed to kill bacteria and other pathogens that can cause illness in humans. They are incredibly lightweight and easy to pack, which makes them appealing. However, some tablets can take up to an hour to be fully effective and may not neutralize some chemical pollutants.

Purification straws are another popular option. Their recent boost in popularity also brought a decline in once high prices. Like the pills, they are lightweight and easy to transport. Opposed to the traditional pumps that can are rather bulky. However, they are not ideal for purifying large quantities of water (since you have to drink it through the straw) and may not eliminate all viruses found in water.

Ultimately, choosing the correct water purification system will come down to personal preference and determining what kind of emergency situations you’re likely to encounter.

Solar Lantern

Space is valuable in your survival kit, which can make it difficult to justify the inclusion of something as bulky as a solar lantern. However, if you anticipate being without electricity for a long period of time, it might end up being a lifesaver.

In addition to providing light, many modern lanterns also come with USB ports perfect for recharging your phone or other electronic devices. Because of its multipurpose capabilities, this is definitely a smart item to include in your kit. Some even have bug zappers included in them.

Stun Gun

You never know when you will need to defend yourself in an emergency situation, but carrying an actual gun is not a possibility for everyone. Depending on the model, a gun can take up too much space in your kit—not to mention the space that ammo will take up too. For these reasons, a stun gun is a must for any survival kit.

Many brands are no bigger than a cell phone, which makes storage and transport incredibly easy. Additionally, stun guns won’t draw unwanted attention to yourself. It’s a discreet, lightweight alternative to more traditional forms of protection.

Compact rifles that can breakdown into the stock are also highly recommended. It is always good to have a defense mechanism for attackers of two legs or four legs. Although, these will not bring the lightweight approach that some tasers can, there provide a lot more stopping power then a taser.

Poncho Shelter

If you find yourself in the wilderness, you’ll need some sort of shelter, but tents can be bulky and take up space in your kit that’s better utilized by other items. A poncho shelter provides all the protection of a traditional tent without taking up any space in your kit. You can literally wear it on your back!

Granted, it might not be as luxurious as a fancy tent, but when it comes to survival, it will absolutely get the job done. In some situations I prefer sleeping under a tarp, I can exit easier and faster as opposed to a traditional tent.

About the author:

Joe Humphries is a contributing writer and media Specialist for High Tech Safety. He regularly writes for survival and personal defense blogs, with an emphasis on nonlethal self defense.

https://www.hightechsafety.com/

By Daisy Luther – The Organic Prepper

The false alarm in Hawaii yesterday should be an enormous wake-up call. It should inspire everyone, everywhere to make a survival shelter plan.

While people who panicked are busy pointing fingers at the person who allegedly “hit the wrong button” and sent out a message warning of an incoming missile and to seek immediate shelter, where should that finger really point?

Hardly anyone had a plan for where they would take shelter.

For 38 minutes, hysteria reigned supreme across the island state after Hawaiians awoke to this message on their cell phones.

On the television, the following warning was issued:

I can’t even imagine how it must have felt to think that your life was about to end in the next 15 minutes. In some places, sirens were blaring. People were screaming and crying. Stories across social media spoke of the terror.

Social media users posted videos, photos, and testimonials about residents hurriedly taking up shelter while thinking they were under attack.

 ‘I was sitting in the bathtub with my children, saying our prayers,’ Hawaii state representative Matt LoPresti told CNN in emotional interview after false missile alert.

One Twitter user wrote: ‘My family was hiding in the garage. My mom and sister were crying. It was a false alarm, but betting a lot of people are shaken.’ (source)

Visitors were also left reeling.

California resident Elizabeth Fong is in Hawaii looking to buy a house and received the alert. She said she didn’t receive a correction alert stating it was a false alarm until 8:46 a.m., 39 minutes after the initial alert.

The aftermath of the false alert was “crazy,” she told NBC Bay Area, and prompted people to run around on the streets “crying and screaming,” wondering what to do.

“I prayed to God and asked for forgiveness of my sins and for Him to protect us,” she said, adding that people are still shaken up. (source)

There are videos of desperate parents putting their children into the storm drains to try and save them. There are first-person stories about the longest 38 minutes of people’s lives.

Why didn’t anyone have a survival plan?

The most important part of preparedness is planning ahead. Hawaii has been the state at greatest risk of an attack by North Korea. There were reports of an outright threat against Hawaii. There have been drills and meetings in which only a few people participated. Many people didn’t even notice the sirens being tested.

For months, the media has been full of stories about the risks of a ballistic missile attack on Hawaii and yet, many people had no idea where they would take shelter.

And shelter is only the first concern – what about the weeks of fallout in which people would need to shelter in place? What about food? Water? Search and rescue?

What about a plan?

It isn’t all about fear to make a contingency plan. No one really knows why or how this alert was sounded, but the fact remains that there was wholesale panic. When we are prepared, we don’t need to panic.

Survival Shelter Checklist

There are two things for which people would need to prepare: the blast and the fallout.

No one WANTS to think about this kind of thing, but it’s oh-so-important. Keep in mind that a survival shelter doesn’t have to be a “bunker” in the traditional sense. (Although how awesome would that be?) It could be your basement, an interior room in the house, a room with fewer windows and access points, or a room that you can harden if necessary. If there is absolutely no place in your home where you can shelter, find out if the town where you reside has a public fallout or blast shelter.

The goal is to put as much MASS between you and the outside air as possible. The ideal amount is 3 feet. Windows are not an acceptable barrier. But DO NOT let a situation that is less than ideal overwhelm you to the point that you don’t take the steps you can. Very few of us have a concrete underground bunker with no windows. Very few of us have an unlimited budget. Start with the basics and add the things you can, when you can.

Answer the following questions:

  • Where would you take shelter for 14-21 days?
  • Do you have the necessary supplies to fortify your shelter? (Duct tape, heavy plastic, boards, sandbags – seal off windows, doors, vents, and any other place where a draft can get through)
  • Is the shelter stocked with enough food for you to wait for the radiation to dissipate?
  • Do you have a way to safely cook it? Alternatively, do you have foods that don’t require cooking?
  • Do you have blankets and comfort items?
  • Do you have enough water for everyone?
  • Do you have potassium iodide and do you know how to take it? (Learn here)
  • How would you use the bathroom in your shelter? (Learn to make a kitty litter toilet)
  • How would your pets do their business? (Puppy pads? Newspaper? Litter box?)
  • Do you have enough pet food?
  • Do you have supplies for special needs like diapers, formula, medications, comfort items?
  • Do you have something for people to do while you shelter in place? (Games, crafts, books?)

Print off this checklist HERE.

You need to make this survival shelter plan now. Whether you live in Hawaii, a city, or out in the country, you absolutely must be ready. If that warning comes to your phone, you will be much calmer if you know what you are going to do.

Resources for making a survival shelter plan

You don’t want to be running around at the last 15 minutes trying to figure out where you will go shelter. Do this NOW.

Imagine the peace of mind you’ll have when this is done. Isn’t that much better than panic?

This article first appeared at The Organic PrepperWhy (And How) EVERYONE Should Make a Survival Shelter Plan (+ Printable Checklist)

About the author:

Daisy Luther

Daisy is a coffee-swigging, gun-toting, homeschooling blogger who writes about current events, preparedness, frugality, and the pursuit of liberty on her website, The Organic Prepper. Daisy is the publisher of The Cheapskate’s Guide to the Galaxy, a monthly frugality newsletter, and she curates all the most important news links on her aggregate site, PreppersDailyNews.com. She is the best-selling author of 4 books and lives in the mountains of Virginia with her two daughters and an ever-growing menagerie. You can find Daisy onFacebookPinterest, and Twitter.