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All posts for the month May, 2017

By Daisy Luther – The Organic Prepper

Prepping isn’t all about whiling away your hours in a bunker, reloading ammo. It’s about the everyday things we do and the differences in our mindsets from non-preppers, and these are things that only real preppers will understand.

Preppers know these are actually signs of sanity, but we get used to being misunderstood by the unprepared and the mainstream media, who all seem to think that we’re crazy. Sometimes it’s fun to have a good laugh about their misconceptions of what we actually do.

You might be a prepper if these signs relate to you.

Many of the following signs will be so relatable that they’ll probably give you a warm glow. Feel the prepper solidarity!

  1. Pantries are so mainstream…you have food stashed in strange places in every room of the house.
  2. You have enough toilet paper to get through a year of uncomfortable digestive upsets…occurring with 6 people simultaneously
  3. Speaking of which, you possess at least 3 different ways to use the bathroom, only one of which is an actual bathroom.
  4. Your kids know what OPSEC means…at the age of 4.
  5. You have topographical maps of your area…plural.
  6. When you’re forced to interact with “the others” you feel like you are awkwardly censoring your true opinions
  7. You think nothing of treating an injury or illness yourself because “what if there was no doctor?
  8. Paintball and laser tag are no longer just a fun way to spend an afternoon  …they are tactical training.
  9. You’ve purchased duct tape in bulk.
  10. With every major purchase, you contemplate going for the off-grid version.
  11. You have more manual tools than power tools.
  12. You’ve washed entire loads of laundry by hand for either necessity or practice. (And not just your dainties…we’re talking about jeans and stuff!)
  13. Your kids are not afraid of guns…or fingers pointed like guns…or pastries in the shape of guns…or drawings of guns.
  14. When house-hunting you look for multiple heat and water sources.
  15. You store food in buckets…lots of buckets…like, maybe even a whole room full of buckets.
  16. You garden with a determination and time commitment normally reserved for endurance athletes training for an Ironman triathlon.
  17. If you don’t have a water source on your property, you have put in miles of footwork searching for one nearby, and have mapped multiple discreet routes to and from the source, and figured out how to haul the water back to your house on each route.
  18. Your first instinct when hearing about some event on the mainstream news is skepticism. (False flag event, anyone?)
  19. You read articles about multiple ways to use white vinegar and nod your head throughout.
  20. You believe that FEMA camps are real and that you are most likely on “The List”.
  21. Instead of CNN, you have alternative news sites bookmarked in your favorites on your computer.
  22. You have enough coffee/tea/favorite-caffeinated-item-of-choice to last you through 3 apocalypses.
  23. You could outfit a small-town pharmacy with all of the over-the-counter medications you have stashed away.
  24. You have an instinctive mistrust of anyone working for the government.
  25. You could sink a ship with the weight of your stored ammo. In fact, you put it in the basement when you became concerned about your floorboards.
  26. Looking for a fun weekend outing with the kids? Forget amusement parks –  the shooting range is where it’s at.
  27. When the power goes out, you calmly light the candles and proceed with whatever you had been dong previously.
  28. A longer-term power outage is called “practice”.
  29. If a like-minded person comes over to your house, they’ll realize you are “one of them” by seeing your reading material. Other folks won’t even notice. The FBI might call your copy of The Prepper’s Blueprint and your A. American fiction  “subversive literature”.
  30. Your children carry a modified bug-out kit in their school backpacks.
  31. You can and dehydrate food with the single-minded fervor of an Amish grandmother facing a 7-year drought.
  32. Calling 911 is not part of your home security plan.
  33. You spend your days off digging an underground bunker in your backyard.
  34. You have more than a thousand cheapo lighters that you purchased in bulk, stashed away in the back of your linen closet…and you don’t even smoke.
  35. You eat a lot of survival food now, so there is no ‘system shock’ when you are forced to eat only the items you have stocked (or that you GROW – hint hint).
  36. You stock alcohol in mass quantities so you can comfortably numb after the SHTF.
  37. You stock alcohol in mass quantities – and you don’t even drink. (Barter, baby!)
  38. You know what? Forget stocking alcohol.  You have your own still.  You’ll make alcohol.
  39. You have enough salt to create another Dead Sea.
  40. You don’t move – you strategically relocate.
  41. You purchased 50 of these little EDC multitaskers already for stocking stuffers for your friends/family/workmates/neighbor/random stranger.
  42. Speaking of Christmas, you gave Conflicted to everyone last year.
  43. When your friends ask about your favorite authors, instead of Hemmingway, Tolkien, or Kerouac, you get a blank stare when you tell them it’s John ‘Lofty’ Wiseman.
  44. You know exactly how many Mountain House buckets it takes to make a base for a single bed.
  45. You don’t stock up on milk. You get an actual cow.
  46. Your family doesn’t dare take something from the food stockpile without marking it off the list.
  47. Your kids know how to don a gas mask in 30 seconds.
  48. Everyone in your survival group carries the same firearm so that ammo is standardized.
  49. You have non-electric versions of appliances like wheat grinders, washing machines, and coffee makers.
  50. You yell at the TV every time a commercial for Doomsday Preppers comes on.  Oh. Wait. You don’t have a TV. But if you did, you’d yell, because you know how positively ridiculous and unrealistic that show is.
  51. Your family is no longer surprised when you announce, “Hey, we’re going to learn how to make (insert anything here)!”
  52. You have more how-to books stored on hard-drives than most public libraries have on the bookshelves.
  53. Your children have a plan in case they need to bug out from school.
  54. Alternatively, you homeschool and bugging out is part of the curriculum.
  55. You have more than three ways to cook dinner if the power goes out: a woodstove, a barbecue, a sun oven, a fire-pit, and/or a volcano stove.
  56. First Blood and Red Dawn are basic training films for your family.
  57. You have long since accepted the idea that if you’re not on someone’s list, you’re probably not doing it right.
  58. Your 7-year-old knows Morse code.
  59. You’re secretly disappointed when the electricity comes back on after only a few minutes.
  60. You know more ways to make a homemade knife than the entire population of your local prison combined.
  61. You don’t just rotate food, you rotate ammo.
  62. You know the distance from your door to your front gate is precisely 207 yards.
  63. Moving to a new house is no longer “moving”, but “strategic relocation“.
  64. You have mapped out at least 3 different routes by car and 2 different routes on foot to get to your bug-out location.
  65. You know the difference between “Tyvek” and “Tychem” suits, and in which instance they should be used.
  66. Ditto the finer points of N-95 vs. N-100 masks.
  67. You watch The Walking Dead in order to critique their survival tactics. (And you were secretly delighted to see Beth building a fire in a Dakota pit.)
  68. Speaking of fire, you can start one in at least 3 different ways, and you always carry a lighter, a fresnel lens, and a magnesium firestarter.
  69. You have two (or more) of everything important, well, because “one is none.”
  70. You have a decoy food supply.
  71. Your kids think it’s a fun game to see who can find the most potential weapons in a room.
  72. Even your dog has a bug out bag – which she carries herself.
  73. You have elected NOT to purchase greater armament because you plan on upgrading with your future assailant’s weaponry.
  74. Your EDC includes a knife, firearm w/extra mag, flashlight, mylar blanket, Chapstick, and an ounce of silver — and that’s just for when you’re walking the dog.
  75. The trunk of your car has enough supplies to carry the family through an entire week during a major blizzard.
  76. One criterion for your new winter coat is that it fits over your body armor.
  77. Your neighbors separate their compost for you into a) chicken food b) garden food and c) other
  78. You scour travel size aisles because they fit better in bug-out bags and they make great barter items.
  79. You check out the garden center and pest control section for potential weapons.
  80. Your subscribed channels for YouTube and bookmarks now contain more prepper and alternative media sites than cute animal sites.
  81. Christmas and birthday gifts have a prepper theme.
  82. You actually know what the letters “EMP” stand for.
  83. Every time there is a small household “disaster” like a power outage or local water “boil order” you just grab your emergency supplies and remind dubious family members. “See, told you it pays to be prepared.”
  84. Your freeze-dried food has a longer expiration date than you do
  85. You know how to make bows out of skis and arrows out of garden bamboo.
  86. You have (or are seriously considering, buying) an old armored personnel carrier to turn into your RV.
  87. You know that Falling Skies has better idea for post-apocalyptic survival than The Walking Dead or Z Nation but you still watch them all just in case
  88. Your friend asks “Do you have enough bullets?” then you both laugh and laugh because you know you can never have enough.
  89. You changed your home page from MSN (or any other propaganda media) to Drudge Report or SHTFplan.
  90. You have no problem knocking on strangers’ doors to ask for fruit tree cuttings
  91. You have vacuum packed underwear in a plastic tub stashed somewhere in your house
  92. You just might have more medical supplies than the local ER.
  93. The Co-op and Costco recognize you but pretend not to. They know better than to ask questions about your purchases.
  94. If you’re a man you are no longer embarrassed to buy tampons and sanitary napkins because they make great bandages.
  95. If you’re a woman you know you don’t need to buy tampons or sanitary napkins because so many other options exist.
  96.  You actually own a toilet seat that fits on a bucket.
  97. You have enough wood cut and stacked to form a barricade around your whole property.
  98. Admit it. Every time the power goes out, you go see if your car starts so you can get the jump on hunkering down or buying out the store with case in the event that this one is actually an EMP.
  99. You have considered filtering water with a coffee filter or a t-shirt.

Do you have more prepper signs to add?

These signs that you might be one of those “crazy preppers” are consolidated from the hive mind of two previous articles and comments from the readers. (Find them here and here.) Do you have more signs to add?  Share them in the comments section below.

This article first appeared at The Organic Prepper99 Relatable Things That Only Preppers Will Understand

About the Author:

Daisy is a coffee-swigging, gun-toting, homeschooling blogger who writes about current events, preparedness, frugality, and the pursuit of liberty on her websites, The Organic Prepper and DaisyLuther.com She is the author of 4 books and the co-founder of Preppers University, where she teaches intensive preparedness courses in a live online classroom setting. You can follow her on Facebook, Pinterest, and Twitter,.

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By  – The Prepper Journal

According to the USGS, Each year the southern California area has about 10,000 earthquakes. Most of them are so small that they are not felt. Only several hundred are greater than magnitude 3.0, and only about 15-20 are greater than magnitude 4.0. If there is a large earthquake, however, the aftershock sequence will produce many more earthquakes of all magnitudes for many months. Scientists have not found a way to predict earthquakes and earthquakes have a nasty habit of occurring where a lot of people are living.

Just look at the image at the top of the page. Most of the western coast of North America is covered in earthquake activity. We don’t really doubt that if a big earthquake happens, our lives will be disrupted, but outside of the usual power outages and water main breaks, assuming our house hasn’t caved in, what other situations could we be looking at?

Earthquakes are probably the single most destructive force on the planet when you factor in damage caused by Tsunamis and the earthquake itself. In a serious quake, services such as power, water, communication, emergency response, gas, transportation could all be wiped out in a matter of a few terrifying seconds. If you live in one of those areas above with all the white circles, you have undoubtedly considered what you would do if an earthquake happens, but what do you need to plan for after the earthquake? I put together this earthquake survival list for those preppers who want to put a bag together and prepare for the possibility that their entire world comes crumbling down around them.

What do I do after an earthquake?

Before we get into the earthquake survival kit itself, you must first make sure everything is OK in the immediate minutes after the shock-waves have stopped.

  • The initial shock-waves may only be the first of many that could still cause injuries. Expect aftershocks and use the time between instances to get to a safer place. If you are anywhere near the coast, Tsunamis could occur so immediately seek higher ground.
  • Check your family or group for injuries and move injured people to a safe location.

Continue reading at The Prepper Journal: Build Your Own Earthquake Survival Kit

By Ken Jorgustin – Modern Survival Blog

Storing an amount of extra water and food to be prepared for 1-week is smart and cheap preparedness insurance for many of the “most likely to happen” disruptions that you may encounter one day.

You may be surprised that the majority of Americans apparently do not have a solid 1-week supply of food at home, and most certainly don’t have a 1-week supply of stored water either.

The assumption is that the faucet will always deliver clean drinking water and the grocery store will always be open and accessible. Unfortunately this normalcy bias has helped keep the notion of preparedness out of the mainstream consciousness.

While having a supply of food and water to last 1-week will not cover all hypothetical disruptions, it will set you off in the right direction to be prepared for many of today’s typical disruptive events within “Prepping and Preparedness 1” and hopefully eventually moving you towards “Prepping and Preparedness 2”.

Here’s what you might consider doing regarding water and food:

Continue reading at Modern Survival Blog: Prepping For 1 Week -Water and Food

By Jeremiah Johnson – Ready Nutrition

So, Guys and Gals out there in ReadyNutrition Land, why not another primer on a tool you can use to develop the combat skills?  Yes, I’m referring to the heavy bag, that large, cylindrical/tubular “punching” bag with a slew of different uses.  As the name suggests, it should be heavy.  Such weight provides resistance for the training you will follow after, and it also gives a better chance for the longevity and durability of your bag.

Here’s What You’ll Need to Start Training

A good heavy bag, like this one, can be made out of leather or canvas.  Avoid vinyl/plastic if you can.  The reason for this is manifold: plastic is subjected to changes in temperature that do not affect the leather and canvas bags, as well as a tendency to split/develop a hole more readily.  The leather and canvas ones can develop a hole, but it’s a lot harder.  That leather lasts a long time, and the canvas is durable.  The main thing is to keep both leather or canvas clean and free of molds that can eat through them if left untreated.  Wipe them down after training, and clean up the sweat and moisture.

Secondly, invest in a good pair of bag gloves and a good pair of kicking pads for the instep of your feet.  These can be found readily in your secondhand and thrift stores.  For gloves, I prefer the ones with the small iron/metal bar sewn in around the first joint of the fingers beyond the knuckle.  If you wrap the wrists (and you should), you tuck into the bag glove and go to work.  The leather gloves (again) are the more durable.  Wraps can be purchased (Everlast is a brand), or made from strips of cotton or linen sheets about 1 ½” wide and about three to four feet long.

These wraps come with a loop for the middle finger if commercial, and ties on the other end, to wrap the knuckles and wrist, protecting from broken knuckles or fractures of the wrist by giving support.  A good bag workout should be broken down into “rounds,” such as (for starters) 1-minute rounds with 30 seconds’ rest in between.  Three of these for starters, and if you’ve never done it before, it will “smoke” you.  With time, increase the number of “rounds,” and eventually increase the time of the round.

Training for Hand-to-Hand Combat

With the bag, you can concentrate on the body dimensions of a human.  Another way to improve this is to take either plastic/electric tape (1/2” wide) and “outline” a human head on the bag, and the torso, as well.  You can use masking tape, but this will wear out faster.  Then you practice boxing your heavy-bag man.  Kicking is the same.  The pads will protect both your feet and the bag.  You don’t want to strike the bag either with your unprotected fist or foot.

Watch These Videos

Beginner Shadow Boxing

Heavy Bag for Beginners

Adavnced Heavy Bag Training

A good bag will weigh between 40-50 lbs. on average, and can be obtained for heavier.  It is also possible to “load” your bag with other materials, such as sawdust, lead, or concrete dust.  Make sure your swivel is well-attached and sturdy.  Don’t hang a swivel on the doorframe of a non-bearing partition wall.  Use an outdoor area, such as a porch or balcony, or the inside of a barn or shed.  You must mount the swivel securely and then attach that bad boy preferably with a chain/chains.  This will prevent the bag from striking back.

You can also practice your knife-fighting skills with the bag.  If you do, don’t use a real blade.  Either purchase a “rubber” training knife, or make one of your own from a piece of rubber or plastic, and wrap it up with duct tape.  You want to protect your bag at all times.  Using that edged tanto will just butcher your bag and take the smile off of the would-be samurai’s face.  Perfect your motions for improvised weapons by using the bag as a simulator.  The more realistic you make it, the more effective you’ll be in the field.

Finally, as I’ve stressed before, keep regular and accurate records of your training, so as to vary it in the future and also to chart progress.  Think as a professional and you’ll perform as one.  The heavy bag is not just a bag filled with junk: it is a valuable training tool that will give you the opportunity to learn new skills and reinforce old ones in your repertoire.  It will give you a full workout if you will approach it in this manner.  Stay in that good fight.  JJ out!

About the author:

Jeremiah Johnson is the Nom de plume of a retired Green Beret of the United States Army Special Forces (Airborne). Mr. Johnson was a Special Forces Medic, EMT and ACLS-certified, with comprehensive training in wilderness survival, rescue, and patient-extraction. He is a Certified Master Herbalist and a graduate of the Global College of Natural Medicine of Santa Ana, CA. A graduate of the U.S. Army’s survival course of SERE school (Survival Evasion Resistance Escape), Mr. Johnson also successfully completed the Montana Master Food Preserver Course for home-canning, smoking, and dehydrating foods.

Mr. Johnson dries and tinctures a wide variety of medicinal herbs taken by wild crafting and cultivation, in addition to preserving and canning his own food. An expert in land navigation, survival, mountaineering, and parachuting as trained by the United States Army, Mr. Johnson is an ardent advocate for preparedness, self-sufficiency, and long-term disaster sustainability for families. He and his wife survived Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Cross-trained as a Special Forces Engineer, he is an expert in supply, logistics, transport, and long-term storage of perishable materials, having incorporated many of these techniques plus some unique innovations in his own homestead.

Mr. Johnson brings practical, tested experience firmly rooted in formal education to his writings and to our team. He and his wife live in a cabin in the mountains of Western Montana with their three cats.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition: These Simple Training Techniques Will Prepare You For Emergency Hand-to-Hand Combat

Everything You’ve Wanted To Know About Mulching (But Didn’t Want To Ask)

By Kathy Bernier – Off The Grid News

The question came during a car ride to the annual co-op tree sale, when my farm apprentice asked one of our passengers, a seasoned self-described permaculturist, for a definition of what she did.

After a few halting starts describing site-planning and sustainability and organic and natural, she said, “Basically it just means I mulch a lot.”

We all laughed, but the truth is that mulch is a really big deal. So much so that I consider it to be every gardener’s secret weapon. It is simple, often inexpensive or even free, easy to use, and effective — yet many people are not aware of the wonders of mulch.

It may be easier to define mulch than permaculture, but it, too, is a practice which is wildly diverse and highly personalized. It can be made of virtually any material, used in multiple ways for myriad purposes, and infinitely customized.

What is mulch, exactly? An Internet search of the word yields plenty of opportunities to purchase it but not much in the way of actual definition. In two words, mulch is “ground cover.”

Continue reading at Off The Grid News: Everything You’ve Wanted To Know About Mulching (But Didn’t Want To Ask)

By Theresa Crouse – SurvivoPedia

How self-sufficient are you? Do you grow any of your own foods, or at least cook your own meals from scratch?

If not, you’re dependent on the grocery store for survival and you’re eating foods that may be killing you.

And you’re definitely spending way more than you should be on food.

But how can you change all of that?

The following scenario probably describes many people’s day, at least part of the time:

They come home from work, drop their stuff on the couch, grab a bag of chips and a soda, and relax on the couch. Later, they have a microwaved TV dinner, then, before bed, a few Oreos and a glass of cold milk that you didn’t have to extract from the cow. As a matter of fact, they have no idea where that cow even lives.

Sounds familiar? Of course it does. I just described at least one day in many people’s life, if not an average day. None of that would have been possible before 1910, because that’s when food started being processed commercially. And they would have been healthier because of it.

Continue reading at SurvivoPedia: 5 Tips To Stop You From Wasting Your Budget At The Supermarket

By RyanModern Survival Online

We constantly discuss all the different skills and strategies that can help somebody survive in a SHTF scenario.  However, when it comes right down to it we can boil everything down to a handful of things that can spell disaster. Sure, there is a possibility that you get eaten by a bear or starve to death.  However, there are much more likely ways to perish.

When I look back on the survival challenges that I have completed, there was almost always something that caught me off guard. These are the things that could cause a person to die in a survival situation.  In this article, I am going to discuss the most likely ways that a survival scenario can go South.  I will also cover the ways you can avoid these pitfalls.

Panic

When a person is not prepared for a survival situation, it is very common for them to panic.  This is the primary reason that people lose their lives in these scenarios.  Panic prevents a person from rationally analyzing their situation and formulating a plan for success.  Survival is all about adapting and strategizing.

It is a natural reaction.  We are all built with a fight or flight mechanism when our lives are on the line. This pumps adrenaline through our veins.  It is important that you learn to control this instinct and use it to your advantage.  When you can calm your mind and think your way through the situation, you will likely come out on top.

Hypothermia

If you look at actual cause of death in survival situations, hypothermia kills more people than any other single threat.  This is the process of your body shutting down as your internal temperature drops below 95F.  One of the most dangerous aspects of hypothermia is that people think it can only happen in freezing conditions.  The fact is that hypothermia can happen in just about any environment around the planet.  Without protection from the elements, the average person can only survive three hours in cold or wet weather.

Continue reading at Modern Survival Online: 8 Things That Can Go Wrong in the Next Disaster