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All posts for the month June, 2016

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By Daisy Luther – The Organic Prepper

This summer has already been setting records for heat across the country and it’s only June. As the electrical power grid struggles to meet the high demands of central air conditioners battling the heat wave, these hot weather cooking tips can help you to keep your cool without cranking the air even higher.

Cooking is the activity that adds the most ambient heat to your home, followed by running a dryer.  Your choice of cooking methods can greatly increase the temperature in your house, and then your air conditioner must work harder to overcome it. This can add a lot to your electric bill, and worse, if you have no air conditioner, choosing the wrong cooking method can make your home humid, muggy and miserable.

Hot Weather Cooking Tips

Now is the time to seek some different kitchen strategies.  We can look back in history for a guideline, based on what our pioneer ancestors ate.  Foods were lighter and required less cooking since nearly all cooking was done on a wood-burning stove that would have made the house unbearable. As well, many people set up summer kitchens, consisting of either a separate building to keep the main house cooler or an outdoor fireplace.  We can take our cues from them and adapt their diets to our modern lifestyles.

  1. Change your eating habits with the thermometer. As the weather warms up, the harvest from your garden will increase.  Most summer vegetables require little, if any, cooking, and can generally be quickly steamed to perfection on the stove top.  Look for easy, no-cook recipes and fast non-processed foods.
  2. Break out the kitchen gadgets.  Instead of firing up the oven,  or cooking something for hours on the stove top, pull out those dusty, seldom-used kitchen gadgets.  Toaster ovens, countertop grills, and slow cookers can all make meals without heating up the house. If I am going to be gone for the day, I often put something in the crock pot for a nice meal to welcome us home.  (I’ve included a couple of our favorite recipes below.)  The low heat of the crock pot will not affect the temperature in your home, and it’s a great way to tenderize a less expensive cut of meat, to which you can add some fresh veggie sides at dinner time.  Skip the roasting and baking during the summer.
  3. Always make enough to have leftovers.  Leftovers are a goldmine for speedy future meals.  They generally require just a quick heat in the toaster oven or on the stovetop, and some foods are delicious when compiled into a cold salad or rolled up in a flatbread.
  4. Take it outside.  Use a barbecue, a solar cooker, or an outdoor fireplace to cook your meals in the summer, keeping all of the cooking heat outdoors.  If you are grilling meat outdoors, make extra to add some quick protein to your salads.
  5. Focus on local abundance.  Even if you don’t have a garden, you can still have delicious local produce.  Hit your farmer’s market and plan your menus around the seasonal goodness found there. (Find farmers and markets in your area HERE!) Enjoy summer fruits and vegetables like berries, cucumbers, peaches, tomatoes, and much more!  None of these requires much, if any, cooking time.  Just wash and eat!
  6. Try different protein options.  Look for delicious plant-based sources of protein.  Beans picked fresh from the garden won’t require nearly as much cooking time as the dry ones sitting in your pantry.  If you prefer animal products, look for quick-cooking proteins like fish, chicken cut into small pieces, and eggs.  Save large oven-baked roasts for winter fare, or at the least, use an alternative cooking method.
  7. Enjoy the health benefits of eating seasonally.   Seasonal foods provide you with exactly what you need at different times of the year.  For example, in the spring, those tender leafy sprigs like lettuce, kale, peas and pea shoots, and asparagus provide vitamins K and folate, which support blood health, bone health, and cell repair.  The cool delicate foods are light, low in calories, and rejuvenating to the body as you gear up for the upcoming warm weather.  Feasting on these waistline-friendly foods is a great way to get rid of that  insulating layer of fat that you may have acquired during the winter.
  8. You’ll save money in more ways than one.  Not only will your electric bill be reduced by adjusting your summer eating habits, but so will your grocery bill.  Seasonal foods are less expensive by nature of their abundance at a given time.  Farmers MUST sell them quickly or they’ll spoil.  So you can often purchase them in large quantities at rock bottom prices. And if they come directly from your garden, it’s even better for your wallet!

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Crock Pot “Rotisserie” Chicken

Here’s a delicious way to cook a whole chicken without turning on the oven. The skin will not be crisp but the meat will be moist and delicious. If you want to crisp the skin, you can carefully remove the chicken at the end of the cooking time and pop it under the broiler for a few minutes.  This is ridiculously easy and you don’t need to add any liquid.  The juices from the chicken and the fruit and veggies you stuff it with will create enough liquid to make gravy if you so desire.

Ingredients:

  • Whole chicken
  • Lemon or lime
  • Onion, cut in half
  • A few cloves of garlic to taste
  • Seasoning of choice

Directions:

  1. Shove the onion, citrus, and garlic inside the cavity of your chicken.
  2. Put your chicken into the crockpot, breast side up. If you want to raise it up a little, wad up a couple of balls of tinfoil tightly to put under it.
  3. Sprinkle the outside of the chicken with your favorite herbs and spices. (I really like this blend by Braggs.)
  4. Turn your crockpot on low and go away for 8 hours. Test that the chicken is done by gently checking to see if the leg is loose. If you can gently pull it away, then the meat is done.

Note: You can start with a frozen chicken too. Turn the crockpot on high for the first 3-4 hours, then down to low for the last 4 hours.

Crock Pot Con Carne

Serve your con carne on a bed of rice or in soft tortillas.  Top it with sour cream or plain yogurt, and garden fresh chopped lettuce, peppers, and tomatoes.

Ingredients

  • 2 pounds beef or pork roast, or 2 pounds of skinless, boneless chicken
  • 4 cups of diced tomatoes
  • 1 diced bell pepper
  • 1 finely minced onion
  • ¼ cup of fresh cilantro or 2 tbsp dried cilantro or 2 tbsp parsley
  • 2 cloves of garlic, crushed
  • 4 tbsp of chili powder
  • Salt and pepper to taste
  • 1 tbsp of brown sugar

Directions

  1. In the crock pot, combine all ingredients except the roast.
  2. Add the roast to the crock pot, being sure to submerge the meat completely.
  3. Cook on low for 8-10 hours.
  4. Remove the meat from the crock pot and use two forks to shred it.
  5. Place the meat back into the liquid in the pot and stir it together.  Allow it to sit, uncovered, for 10 minutes before serving.

This article first appeared at The Organic Prepper: 8 Hot Weather Cooking Tips to Help You Keep Your Cool

About the author:

Daisy Luther is a single mom who lives in a small village in the mountains of Northern California, where she homeschools her youngest daughter and raises veggies, chickens, and a motley assortment of dogs and cats.   She is a best-selling author who has written several books, including The Organic Canner,  The Pantry Primer: A Prepper’s Guide to Whole Food on a Half-Price Budget, and The Prepper’s Water Survival Guide: Harvest, Treat, and Store Your Most Vital Resource.  Daisy is a prolific blogger who has been widely republished throughout alternative media. On her website, The Organic Prepper, Daisy uses her background in alternative journalism to provide a unique perspective on health, self-reliance, personal liberty, and preparedness. You can follow her on Facebook, Pinterest,  and Twitter,.

water-300x225

By Joshua Krause – Ready Nutrition

You’ve probably seen it countless movies and TV shows. Some poor guy is stranded out in the desert, and is in desperate need of water. So he cuts into a cactus, and harvests an abundance of lifesaving H2O. In the real world however, most cacti don’t really provide much water. The fluid they do provide is far from potable. In all likelihood it will induce vomiting and delirium rather than quench your thirst.

But that doesn’t mean you can’t gather water from other plants. In fact, there are several tree species you can tap for fresh drinking water, in much the same way you would tap a cactus (if you had a death wish). While everyone knows that you can tap maple trees for their syrup, birch and walnut trees can also be tapped. They will produce a fluid that has a much lower sugar content than maple, though all three are good sources of hydration in case you’re ever stranded in the wilderness. Here’s how it’s done:

Or if you’d rather make a less intrusive mark in the tree, you can use this slightly different technique.

This information has been made available by Ready Nutrition: How to Harvest Clean Drinking Water From a Tree

About the author:

Joshua Krause was born and raised in the Bay Area. He is a writer and researcher focused on principles of self-sufficiency and liberty at Ready Nutrition. You can follow Joshua’s work at our Facebook page or on his personal Twitter.

Joshua’s website is Strange Danger

 

 

PJ - 0 - BISON Ranche Charcuterie

By  – The Prepper Journal

Growing and storing foods is commonly a goal we strive for as we seek self-sufficiency. The easiest and fastest way to store foods is, of course, just dumping it into a root cellar or grain bin or barn, although not everything does so hot with that treatment. Hanging things like corn or onion braids from rafters or digging a pit to keep carrots or potatoes in is pretty close. We’ve been drying slivers and chunks of foods in the air for millennia now. All those methods of food preservation have transcended time pretty easily.

Some methods, however, have been lost along the way, or how we’ve done them has changed drastically – sometimes due to food safety understanding, but sometimes because our modern worlds make something else or another method far easier. Pressure canners and water bath canning aren’t exactly new, but they aren’t really historic methods, either. Folks needed other ways of getting from harvest to harvest once they stopped foraging as nomads, and for a long stretch of time, people were preserving meats, veggies, fruits and even eggs without electricity or refrigeration. Not every way I’ll point out was used extensively or often, nor do they all transfer to all climates or modern times, but some of them do.

Continue reading at The Prepper Journal: Lessons From History – Eating Well Off Home Food Preservation

Survivopedia corn

By  – SurvivoPedia

Corn has a bad reputation today. Besides being genetically modified, corn today has been transformed into high-fructose corn syrup. It’s creeping into all kinds of foods and beverages where it never belonged.

The modern agriculture movement has taken this important crop and turned it into something to be avoided. The soil becomes so depleted it needs tons of fertilizer to continue producing. It’s been eroded, and completely disturbed. But a quick look at history will show that our ancestors depended on this staple crop.

Continue reading at SurvivoPedia: Basic Survival Food From Your Garden: Corn

Food Preservation Secrets Of The Native Americans

Image source: National Archives

By Tammy Robinson Off The Grid News

Traditional food preservation and storage methods have seen an uptick in popularity in the past decade, as people show an interest in learning how the native people of America preserved food and kept it safe for later consumption without refrigeration.

Of course, in winter months, storing food to prevent spoilage wasn’t such a huge concern, but in some parts of the country, indigenous people lived in areas that did not freeze or had a small number of freezing incidents.

Let’s take a look at how the native people dried and stored fruits, vegetables, and meat for consumption during the winter months or for times when food was scarce.

Continue reading at Off The Grid News: Long-Term Food Preservation Secrets Of The Native Americans

5 Gallon Bucket Book | Backdoor Survival

By Gaye Levy – Backdoor Survival

When this newest Prepper Book Festival was launched, I indicated there would be some fun titles along the more serious fiction and non-fiction titles. Couple practicality and usefulness with fun and and we have a real win.  Such is the case with today;s book, 5 Gallon Bucket Book: DIY Projects, Hacks, and Upcycles.

Here in my household, collecting 5 gallon buckets takes second place only to mason jars, and you know how I feel about them!  Give me a few dozen buckets and jars and I can and do store anything.  There is one critical difference between the two, however, and that is I am very clever at scoring pre-owned buckets for free from restaurants and bakeries.

Continue reading at Backdoor Survival: Prepper Book Festival 12: 5-Gallon Bucket Book + Giveaway

About the author:

Gaye Levy started Backdoor Survival so that she could share her angst and concern about our deteriorating economy and its impact on ordinary, middle-class folks. She also wanted to become a prepper of the highest order and to share her knowledge as she learned it along the way. On Backdoor Survival you will find survival and preparedness tools and tips for creating a self-reliant lifestyle through thoughtful prepping and optimism.

To read more from Gaye, visit her website, Backdoor Survival. You can also follow Gaye on Facebook, Twitter, Google+ and Pinterest or purchase her eBook, The Prepper’s Guide to Food Storage on Amazon.com.