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All posts for the month January, 2016

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By The Survival Place Blog

Today, we’re looking at the most hostile and unexplored region on the planet: the ocean. It doesn’t get much more terrifying or dangerous than under the sea. We still know so little about this vast expanse. In fact, we know more about the solar system and space than we do our own oceans. The sea has claimed its fair share of victims who failed to act accordingly underwater. Just like any hostile environment, the ocean demands respect. Whether you’re sailing on top, or diving below.

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In this post, we’ll teach you how to dive correctly, and avoid the most common mistakes. Diving has a mythical aura about it, but it’s certainly not to be taken lightly. It is fascinating and exciting, but it’s also dangerous. Disorientation is commonplace, and it’s not unusual for divers to lose all sense of where they are. Without further ado, here’s how to survive underwater.

Rule #1: Dive with an expert

The underwater diving community has always maintained the ‘buddy rule’. In other words, always dive with a partner. It’s good for maintaining safe practice, and you can keep an eye on each other. Some diving experts have recently relaxed this rule, and expressed the safety benefits of solo diving. However, this is only for divers with years of experience under their weighted belts. If you’re a newbie, always dive with an experienced expert. Follow their lead.

Rule #2: Get the right gear

You would scale a mountain with dodgy, frayed ropes or a discount snow jacket. So don’t dive without top-of-the-range gear and technology. You’re looking for a high-tech dry suit to start with. Buy the very best you can afford if you expect to use it regularly. Invest in the latest oxygen systems and dive monitoring equipment. You do not want your oxygen and nitrogen monitors to fail. Lastly, if you plan on checking out shipwrecks and established dive sites, load up on underwater lift bags. That way, you can bring things back up to the surface.

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Rule #3: Ascend slowly

Any diver’s instinct tells them to head straight for the surface after a long dive. However, this couldn’t be more dangerous. Ascending quickly wreaks havoc with your pressure system, and can cause a lot of damage. Ascend slowly and carefully. The general rule is one foot every two seconds.

Rule #4: Safety stops

A safety stop is a three-four minute rest before your final ascent. You do this at about 15 feet under the surface. The reason for this stop is to ease the decompression process. It gives your body time to release excess nitrogen before going through the biggest pressure change. (Right under the surface).

Rule #5: Equalise

You all know that the pressure changes as you go deeper. This can have a devastating effect on your ears and bodily systems. That’s why you must ‘equalise’ as you go down. The most common method is squeezing your nose, and blowing to ‘pop’ the pressure in your ears.

With these tips, you’re ready to face the ocean. Good luck!

Delivered by The Survival Place Blog

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Prepper Book Festival Emergency Evacuations | Backdoor Survival

By Gaye Levy – Backdoor Survival

It seems appropriate that the final book in Prepper Book Festival 10 is one that is written by one of the most loved bloggers in the preparedness niche, Lisa Bedford.

Her newest book, Emergency Evacuations: Get Out Fast! is the first book in her “Survival Mom’s No Worries Guide” series.  It is a compilation of information, tips, and checklists that will set you planning in advance for a potential evacuation and let’s face it, you do need to be ready for that possibility.

What I like about this book is that it is concise and to the point.  It is written in a conversational manner as though Lisa and you are having a nice little chat over a cup of coffee.  I also found some unexpected humor that made me smile (“Your getaway vehicle: not just for bank robbers!”)

Continue reading at Backdoor Survival: Prepper Book Festival 10: Emergency Evacuations + Giveaway

About the author:

Gaye Levy started Backdoor Survival so that she could share her angst and concern about our deteriorating economy and its impact on ordinary, middle-class folks. She also wanted to become a prepper of the highest order and to share her knowledge as she learned it along the way. On Backdoor Survival you will find survival and preparedness tools and tips for creating a self-reliant lifestyle through thoughtful prepping and optimism.

To read more from Gaye, visit her website, Backdoor Survival. You can also follow Gaye on Facebook, Twitter, Google+ and Pinterest or purchase her eBook, The Prepper’s Guide to Food Storage on Amazon.com.

The Paratus 3 Day Operator's Pack

By Pat Henry – The Prepper Journal

In Prepper circles there are a myriad of opinions on gear selection. From the best survival knife to the best caliber of handgun to purchase all the way down to paracord differences. The good thing for preppers is that there are so many suppliers of quality gear out there and we get the benefit of competition.

We also get the job of making decisions and in some cases; with the large number of choices you have, finding that one “perfect” thing can be elusive. I myself have purchased more than one of several items in my prepping supplies trying out new options or searching for a better solution. Bug Out Bags are another item in which preppers have options. Some might say too many options to make a good determination, right or wrong about the bag they are going to count on when you need to go mobile and survive.

I was fortunate enough to be contacted by the good folks at 3V Gear. 3V Gear came into being based on the owner, Daniel Beck, trying to find a bug out bag. In Daniels experience, most of the packs out there were very expensive or ill-equipped for the general 72-hour time frame. As with most entrepreneurs he decided to create his own bag. What came from that inspiration was the Paratus (based on Semper Paratus) meaning Always Ready. 3V Gear asked me if I wanted to review one of their Paratus bags for the readers of the Prepper Journal.

Continue reading at The Prepper Journal: Paratus 3 Day Operator’s Pack Review

The 5 Biggest Mistakes Concealed Carriers Make

Image source: concealednation.org

By Travis P Off The Grid News

As a concealed firearms instructor I see students come through my classes from all walks of life, and they all seem to make the same basic mistakes when it comes to carrying a concealed weapon.

Here are the top five mistakes I see concealed carriers make:

1. Using cheap holsters

A lot of people will slap down $500 or more for a gun, but then feel queasy about spending $50 on a holster. That $14.95 holster made in China is nice and cheap, but, man, it’s probably not comfortable. It’s likely made from cheap nylon that sags and offers terrible retention – and will slow and disrupt your draw. Very few universal holsters actually work, and I’ve never seen a nylon model that does work.

Continue reading at Off The Grid News: The 5 Biggest Mistakes Concealed Carriers Make

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By Ken Jorgustin – Modern Survival Blog

This morning I used the infamous ‘SNO-SEAL’ beeswax on my crusty old Timberland leather work boots. In my experience it is the best waterproofing for boots all season long.

As you can see in the picture above, they were used and abused this past year (actually I’ve had these boots for a number of years – although I somewhat rotate what I wear), and they were badly in need of some protection and waterproofing.

Protection for one’s feet (boots!) is VERY important when it comes to preparedness acquisitions, especially since in a time of (collapse?) SHTF, or even normal times while living more self-sufficient (rugged?) – you will certainly be using your feet more often and probably in harsh conditions.

Regularly treating your leather work boots (any leather, not just work boots) with SNO-SEAL is cheap insurance to help keep your feet dry – and to help protect the leather…

Here’s how it works:

Continue reading at Modern Survival Blog: SNO-SEAL Original Beeswax Best Waterproofing For Boots

Shovel Pro

By  – SurvivoPedia

After the record breaking blizzard that has buried the mid-Atlantic in snow, we were faced with a new set of challenges. We’ve talked about insulating your home and making sure no energy is wasted, how to use snow to insulate your home and how to deal with your car and driving under similar circumstances.

What do you do when you are practically paralyzed by the heavy snowfall? How do you get around when flights get cancelled and roads get closed and when nobody even bothers to make sure these roads are accessible to the ambulance and the fire fighters?

Some may say that residential roads fall in the owner’s care and they are the ones who should deal with the snow on those portions. But what happens when the owners are elderly or disabled people, or otherwise unable to shovel this kind of snow and unable to pay for this service? 

Continue reading at SurvivoPedia: Winter Survival: How To Snow Shovel Like A Pro